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The National Security Archive becomes a formal non-governmental organization in July as a project of The Fund for Peace Inc., a tax-exempt public charity, and. The Digital National Security Archives contains over 110000 declassified documents, an archival record of reports, memoranda, correspondence and papers. The Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) is an invaluable online collection of more than 100,000 declassified records documenting historic U.S. policy.

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Frequently Asked Questions

The Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) logo

New to ISOO?  This page contains answers to some of the questions most frequently asked by security professionals.  If you have a question that is not listed here please visit our individual programs or Contact Us.

Guidance listed on this page pertains only to Federal agencies and applicable contractors and is binding on agency actions as required by law and similar authority. The guidance does not apply to, and is not meant to bind, the public, except as authorized by law or regulation or as incorporated into a contract.

Executive Order 13526

What is Classified National Security Information?

In E.O. 13526, section 4.1(f)(3)(B) who determines "standardized electronic formats?" 

​What is the difference between a "confidential human source" and a "human intelligence source?"

Is there a standard procedure for notifying the Archivist in case of reclassification?

According to section 3.3(j)(1)(C) of E.O. 13526, who is responsible for verifying "a specific and independently verifiable event?"

In E.O. 13526, section 3.7(b)(1), how is "timely" defined?

Who do we contact for information on the SF 312, Nondisclosure Agreement?

Are there any circumstances when I might be allowed to take classified documents home with me? 

Who should be the SAO for an agency?


What if a member of the public or a non-governmental archives finds what looks like classified national security information in their collections?

How does Classified Information end up in Private Collections?

How can I identify Classified National Security Information?

How is Classified National Security Information stored and protected?

How is Classified National Security Information transmitted?

How do I file a Mandatory Declassification Review (MDR) request?

How do I find out the MDR Results and Appeal Options?


Marking

What are the requirements for the use of the 50X and 75X exemptions?

What happens to the documents marked 50X-HUM and WMD after 50 years?

What marking goes on the "declassify on" line for derivative documents, if the source document is marked 25X1-Human?

How is a derivative document marked if the source document has no date?

What happens if a document does not have any declassification instructions?

How are dynamic documents portioned marked?

How are documents being declassified remarked?

Can a classification be extended?

If an agency has a current exemption, does it need to be reapproved? 

If a security declassification guide has an instruction to mark certain information for declassification for 25 years, is it from the date of the guide or the date of the document?

If we receive a classified document and notice the classification level is not on the top and bottom of every page is it okay to mark the top and bottom with the appropriate classification level of the document even though we did not create the document?

When were portion markings first required on classified documents?

If individual PowerPoint© slides within a classified presentation have an overall classification of unclassified, is it really necessary to mark the portions as unclassified?

May an agency derivatively classify information from a document prepared/classified by a different agency prior to the effective date of Executive Order 13526 which is not portion marked as would be required under E.O. 13526?


Original Classification Authority (OCA) and Derivative Classification

Is the statement, "original classification authority may extend the duration of classification up to 25 years from the date of the origin of the document" intended to allow an OCA to extend declassification for another 25 years (total 50 years)?

Must anyone who creates derivative work be pre-designated as "authorized" to do so and if so, at what level should the training be?

If an agency is delegated original classification authority (OCA) from another agency (e.g. the ODNI delegating OCA authority to NRO), which agency reports to the Director of ISOO in accordance with the Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies? Is the ODNI to report, or NRO, or both?

Who can derivatively mark documents?

Who is responsible for providing Original Classification Authority (OCA) training to those designated specifically by the President?


What should I know about the new National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM), 32 CFR Part 117?

The NISPOM establishes requirements for the protection of classified information disclosed to or developed by contractors, licensees, grantees, or certificate holders to prevent unauthorized disclosure.  

32 CFR Part 117 became effective February 24, 2021, and authorizes the contractor no more than six months to comply with changes from the effective date of the rule, which is August 24, 2021.  

To assist in implementing the NISPOM Rule and help those not familiar with the rule's new format, the Defense Counterintelligence Security Agency (DCSA) released a cross reference tool.  This tool maps the DoD 5220.22-M format to the appropriate location within the NISPOM Rule.  The tool can be found on the Center for Development of Security Excellence (CDSE) website at https://www.cdse.edu/documents/toolkits-fsos/32CFR_Part117_NISPOM_Rule_Cross_Reference_Tool.xlsx. 

 


Questions re: GSA Containers

What is the Government policy for procuring GSA Approved containers for storing US Government classified information?

What is the process if a defense contractor needs to purchase a GSA Approved container

What is the process if a defense contractor wants to purchase a GSA container off contract and with company dollars?

Does it mean contractors cannot just buy containers from any vendor? Can contractors buy used containers?

Is there a process to re-certify a GSA approved container that we are unsure of or is missing a label?

Is it acceptable to have preventative maintenance performed instead of replacing the safe?

What is the disposal process for used containers?

Black lettering indicates safes are nearing the end of their expected life. Is there information on when they need to be replaced?

Are older versions of locks previously approved under Federal Specification FF-L-2740B (e.g. X-07, X-08, X-09 still allowed to be used?

Is the DODAAC number issued once to a contractor or is there a different number per contract?

Can we use a cabinet owned by our company from other location?


Express Carriers and National Security System 

What overnight express carriers are authorized for NISP cleared contractors?

What is a "national security system" (NSS)?

Can Secret and Confidential information be transmitted by an overnight delivery service within the U.S. and its Territories?

Where can I get additional information on the NSS, incidents, and spills?

Where can I contact the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS)?


Executive Order 13526 

What is Classified National Security Information?

Classified national security information is information created or received by an agency of the federal government or a government contractor that would damage national security if improperly released. Since 1940, the President has managed the system of classifying information by executive order (E.O.); the most recent order concerning classified national security information is E.O. 13526, signed by President Obama on December 29, 2009.

Information can only be classified if an official determination is made that its unauthorized release would damage the national security. Levels of classification correspond to levels of supposed damage. E.O. 13526 specifies that information whose release would cause “exceptionally grave damage to the national security” is classified TOP SECRET; information whose release would cause “serious damage” is classified SECRET; CONFIDENTIAL is the lowest category of classified information currently in use. RESTRICTED is an obsolete category that was discontinued in 1953.

Classified information may take any form. Though paper documents are most common, there are classified photographs, maps, motion pictures, videotapes, databases, microfilms, hard drives, CDs, etc. Regardless of medium, classified information requires protection until it is formally declassified.

The Federal Government's current system of marking and controlling security-classified information dates from World War II. Very little pre-1941 information still meets the criteria for continued classification. Only very specific information dating from before 1942 controlled by the National Security Agency regarding signals intelligence, by the United States Secret Service regarding the protection of the President, and by the U.S. Mint concerning the gold bullion depository at Fort Knox remains classified.

 

In E.O. 13526, section 4.1(f)(3)(B) who determines "standardized electronic formats?"
An agency head or senior agency official, or with respect to the Intelligence Community, the Director of National Intelligence, makes this determination. 

 

What is the difference between a "confidential human source" and a "human intelligence source?"
The two terms are used interchangeably, but "confidential human source" is a term used by the FBI; "human intelligence source" is a term used by the intelligence community.

 

Is there a standard procedure for notifying the Archivist in case of reclassification?
Notification of the Archivist would be accomplished in the same manner that official notifications are made to other heads of Executive branch agencies.

 According to section 3.3(j)(1)(C) of E.O. 13526, who is responsible for verifying "a specific and independently verifiable event?"
The OCA decides and sends the information to the Interagency Security Classification Appeals Panel (ISCAP) for approval.

In E.O. 13526, section 3.7(b)(1), how is "timely" defined?
The Director of the National Declassification Center (NDC) will determine when the referral is made; after which the agency will have one year to adjudicate.

Who do we contact for information on the SF 312, Nondisclosure Agreement? 
Please direct all questions regarding the SF 312 to [email protected]

Are there any circumstances when I might be allowed to take classified documents home with me?
No.  Classified material must be safeguarded in accordance with the requirements in E.O. 13526, Part 4, Safeguarding; and 32 CFR 2001, Subpart E, Safeguarding.
You must not remove classified material from official premises except to conduct official meetings or conferences, and the material must be returned to safe storage facilities immediately upon the conclusion of the meeting or conference.  Residences are not considered official premises, and you must not remove classified material for reasons of personal convenience or keep it overnight in personal custody.

Who should be the SAO for an agency?
SAO is a senior official at the Assistant Secretary level or its equivalent who has direct responsibility for ensuring the department or agency efficiently and appropriately complies with all applicable records management statutes, regulations, NARA policy, and the requirements of the Directive.

The SAO must be located within the organization so as to make adjustments to agency practices, personnel, and funding as may be necessary to ensure compliance and support the business needs of the department or agency. A partial list of some current SAO job titles includes:

  • Assistant Secretary
  • Chief of Staff Chief
  • Financial Officer
  • Chief Information Officer
  • Chief Counsel
  • Chief Operating Officer
  • Director of Administration

What if a member of the public or a non-governmental archives finds what looks like classified national security information in their collections?

How does Classified Information end up in Private Collections?

Former government officials and contractors have been known to retain papers containing classified national security information and to eventually donate them to private archives. Often, it is not until these records are formally processed that archivists realize a collection contains classified information. If an archives or a library has not received Federal approval to store classified materials, continuing to store the records in an unapproved area could be endangering national security. In these instances, the institution should contact the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) at the National Archives and arrange for these records to be securely stored. ISOO will maintain temporary custody of the records through the declassification process.

By contacting ISOO you will be respecting the access restrictions placed on that information by the U.S. government. ISOO, in turn, will respect the rights of your institution to maintain the integrity of collections of donated personal papers.

How can I identify Classified National Security Information?

There are three basic tests which you can apply to determine whether a document contains classified information:

  • The information should concern the national security of the U.S. government. If the document was created by a private organization or a state government agency, it may contain classified national security information only if the organization or agency was serving as an agent of the Federal Government. Defense contractors and research laboratories are obvious examples. Also, the information should not concern personal, private, or purely political issues. Over the decades many documents have been stamped “Confidential” not because they would damage national security if released, but to indicate some other type of sensitivity. When in doubt, though, consider the document as classified.
  • There should be a classification marking on the top and bottom of every page of the document. Very old documents may have the markings only on the top of the first page. In more recent documents, individual paragraphs may also be marked with markings like “(S)” for Secret or “(C)” for Confidential.
  • The document should not be marked as declassified. A declassification marking should look like an official stamp that indicates the name and office of the person who authorized the declassification action. A copy of a declassified document from the National Archives and Records Administration should include a marking that includes a project number starting with “NND” or “NW.”

While these are the primary means of identifying classified information, those who suspect they have classified materials in their collections should also be careful to examine documents for:

  • “Restricted Data” and “Formerly Restricted Data” markings. These designations refer to categories of classified information concerning nuclear weapons design and utilization. Despite the misleading nature of the phrase “Formerly Restricted Data,” documents with this marking remain sensitive and must be protected.
  • Unmarked Classified National Security Information. Records of national security officials should be reviewed and handled carefully, as the classification marking requirements were not always executed on informal records such as handwritten notes. In all cases, it is the sensitivity of the information that determines classification. An unmarked, handwritten page can just as easily contain classified national security information as a document containing classification markings. When in doubt, treat handwritten notes concerning intelligence, military, diplomatic, or emergency planning matters as classified national security information.
  • Declassification Dates. Some documents may have been originally marked with a date on which the document may be declassified. These dates are useful in determining the relative sensitivity of the information contained in the document, but occasionally these markings are erroneous or invalid. Remember that regardless of markings, only a U.S. government declassification authority can declassify classified information.
  • Foreign Government Information. Foreign governments routinely share classified information with the U.S. government. Foreign government information received by a U.S. government agency with a promise of non-disclosure should remain protected, but in some cases information may be declassified and released. Many foreign markings resemble U.S. markings.
  • Controlled Unclassified Information. Federal agencies have designated some types of information as requiring a degree of control that does not rise to the level as that for information that would damage national security if released. These types of markings include “For Official Use Only,” “Limited Official Use,” or “Sensitive but Unclassified.” These types of markings do not designate classified national security information. Archivists processing papers containing U.S. Government information should not release out for social security numbers for living people, health care information, and other personal information collected from private citizens.
  • Closed Congressional Information. Archivists processing the papers of former congressmen should be aware that the rules of the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives restrict public access to certain types of closed committee and investigative records, regardless of whether they contain classified national security information, for up to 50 years.
  • Codeword Information. Since World War II, when the British used the word “Ultra” to designate intelligence obtained by cracking the German Enigma encryption machine, the most sensitive types of information of the U.S. government has been identified by special codewords. These include intercepts of encoded enemy radio signals, information about satellite reconnaissance programs, and human intelligence programs. If you see words like “Umbra,” “Talent-Keyhole,” “Ruff,” or “Gamma” on records also carrying a “Secret” or “Top Secret” classification marking, you should realize that you have in your collections something particularly damaging to national security if improperly released, regardless of the age of the records.

How is Classified National Security Information stored and protected?

If you discover classified materials in your collection and your institution does not have federally approved secure storage, immediately remove the records from public review and restrict access to as few staff members as possible. Until they are ready for transmittal to ISOO, the records should be locked in a safe, filing cabinet, or other secure area.

How is Classified National Security Information transmitted?

Transmittal requirements for classified materials vary depending on the classification level of the information they contain. In all instances, the use of street side mailboxes is prohibited.

CONFIDENTIAL materials may be sent via U.S. Postal Service certified, first class, express, or registered mail or government courier service.

SECRET materials may ONLY be sent via U.S. Postal Service express or registered mail or government courier service.

When mailing materials to ISOO, please adhere to the following guidelines:

Wrap the body of records in opaque paper. Heavy brown paper or brown mailing envelopes are best. CONFIDENTIAL and SECRET materials may be wrapped together.

Seal all seams with filament tape.

Address the package to:

Director, Information Security Oversight Office
National Archives and Records Administration
700 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Room 100
Washington, DC 20408

Provide a return address.

Label the front and back of the package with the highest classification marking of the documents it contains.

Wrap the entire package ONCE MORE in opaque paper.

Again, address the package to the Director of ISOO as indicated above and provide a return address.

On this outer wrapper, do NOT write the classification level of the materials contained within.

Again, seal all seams with filament tape.

TOP SECRET materials may NOT be sent via U.S. mail and may only be transmitted by authorized government courier service. ISOO can make the necessary arrangements on your institution’s behalf.

ISOO staff will give more detailed instructions regarding the shipment of classified records and regarding the temporary retention of records by ISOO pending declassification.

How do I file a Mandatory Declassification Review (MDR) request?

If ISOO determines that the records provided require declassification review by equity-holding agencies, a non-governmental repository will be encouraged to file a Mandatory Declassification Review (MDR) request. The request should come in the form of a formal letter to the Director of ISOO explaining that the institution is filing an MDR for those records furnished to ISOO for temporary custody. ISOO will then contact all equity-holding agencies and provide them with copies of the records for their review.

How do I find out the MDR Results and Appeal Options?

ISOO will communicate the results once all agencies have completed their reviews or after one year’s time, whichever comes first. If an institution is not satisfied with the results of an agency’s review, it may appeal the agency’s initial determination. If an agency or agencies fail to review the records within a year, ISOO will notify the requesting institution of its right to appeal directly to the Interagency Security Classification Appeals Panel (ISCAP) for a final determination on the records’ classification status.

Marking

What are the requirements for the use of the 50X and 75X exemptions?
E.O. 13526, Section 3.3(h)(2) allows for agencies to seek the exemption of specific information from automatic declassification at 50 years in “extraordinary cases.” Records containing information exempted from declassification under this provision will be automatically declassified on December 31 of the year 75 years from the date of origin of those records, unless an agency seeks the exemption of specific information from automatic declassification at 75 years.

Section 3.3(h)(3) allows for agencies to seek the exemption of specific information from automatic declassification at 75 years. Proposals to seek an exemption at 50 or 75 years, shall be submitted to the Director of ISOO, serving as Executive Secretary of the ISCAP, 1 year before the information is subject to automatic declassification.

  • Exemptions require ISCAP approval prior to use.
  • Require a date or event. (50X1-HUM and 50X2-WMD are the only exemptions that can be used without a date)
  • Must be included in agency declassification guide.

Example of requesting a 75X1 or 75X6 exemption:

  1. Description of Information: The identity of senior officials of foreign governments who provided intelligence information to the U.S. about those governments, with the expectation of confidentiality, between 1935 and 1942.
  2. Explanation of Exemption: The declassification the identity of this confidential human source would prevent the U.S. Intelligence Community from collecting intelligence from confidential human sources, and would cause serious harm to the diplomatic relations of the U.S. Government if relationship of those officials to the U.S. Government at that time is not known by the current governments of those nations.
  3. Date or Event for Declassification: Declassify no later than 90 years after the date of the record containing the exempted information.

What happens to the documents marked 50X-HUM and WMD after 50 years?
50X HUM and WMD are already exempted at 50 years and subject to automatic declassification at 75 years. They may be exempted beyond 75 years if the exemption is approved by the ISCAP.

What marking goes on the "declassify on" line for derivative documents, if the source document is marked 25X1-Human?
 “50X1-HUM”

How is a derivative document marked if the source document has no date?
Mark the document 25 years from the date of the creation of the derivative document.

What happens if a document does not have any declassification instructions?
Try to go back to the document originator and obtain the declassification information. If the information can not be traced, review for declassification at 25 years from creation of the document.

How are dynamic documents portioned marked?
Portion mark the sections or portions that you can, and the overall marking of the document. If a section or portion can not be marked, it can not be used a derivative source document.

How are documents being declassified remarked?
The only documents "allowed" to be remarked are those being requested for FOIA, MDR or other public access, and that are still in control of the agency. Do not remark any documents that are subject to automatic declassification or that have been accessioned to the National Archives.  For guidance on remarking declassified documents, refer to the ISOO Marking Book.

Can a classification be extended?
Only an OCA with jurisdiction over the information may extend the duration of classification for up to 25 years from the date of the origin of the document. In cases where an extension is made, the “Declassify On” line shall be revised to include the new declassification instructions and shall include the identity of the person authorizing the extension and the date of the action.

If an agency has a current exemption, does it need to be reapproved? 

All current 10 and 25 year exemptions should be updated with the ISCAP.

If a security declassification guide has an instruction to mark certain information for declassification for 25 years, is it from the date of the guide or the date of the document?
The "25 years" denotes 25 years from the date of document creation, not the date of the security classification guide.

If we receive a classified document and notice the classification level is not on the top and bottom of every page is it okay to mark the top and bottom with the appropriate classification level of the document even though we did not create the document?
Yes, you should go ahead and mark the document properly, but you should also let the sender know so that they can mark the original document properly.

When were portion markings first required on classified documents?

E.O. 11652, Classification and Declassification of National Security Information and Material, June 8, 1972, signed by Richard Nixon

The following rules shall apply to classification of information under this order:
(A) Documents in General. Each classified document shall show on its face its classification and whether it is subject to or exempt from the General Declassification Schedule. It shall also show the office of origin, the date of preparation and classification and, to the extent practicable, be so marked as to indicate which portions are classified, at what level, and which portions are not classified in order to facilitate excerpting and other use. Material containing references to classified materials, which references do not reveal classified information, shall not be classified.

E.O. 12065, National Security Information, June 28, 1978, signed by Jimmy Carter

1.504 In order to facilitate excerpting and other uses, each classified document shall, by marking or other means, indicate clearly which portions are classified, with the applicable classification designation, and which portions are not classified.  The Director of the Information Security Oversight Office may, for good cause, grant and revoke waivers of this requirement for specified classes of documents or information.

If individual PowerPoint© slides within a classified presentation have an overall classification of unclassified, is it really necessary to mark the portions as unclassified?

When you are marking a classified document, it is critical that all portions be appropriately marked so as to avoid any confusion about the classification of each portion.  32 CFR 2001.21(c) states that each portion...shall be marked to indicate which portions are classified and which portions are unclassified.  This remains true regardless of the overall classification of that page.  If you were to take an unmarked portion out of one briefing and place that portion into another briefing, and there is no accompanying marking, you have created a classification problem.

May an agency derivatively classify information from a document prepared/classified by a different agency prior to the effective date of Executive Order 13526 which is not portion marked as would be required under E.O. 13526?

There is an inherent responsibility to go back to the originating agency and request proper markings.  If this is not possible, then the document cannot be used as a source document for other derivatively classified documents and must contain a statement stating so.

Original Classification Authority (OCA) and Derivative Classification

Is the statement, "original classification authority may extend the duration of classification up to 25 years from the date of the origin of the document" intended to allow an OCA to extend declassification for another 25 years (total 50 years)?
There is no intent to allow an OCA to extend classification for another 25 years. This clause relates to information initially classified for less than 25 years. An OCA may extend the classification up to 25 years from the date of origin of the document. For example, on a document created on April 13, 2005, with a declassification date of April 13, 2015, an OCA may extend the duration of classification up to April 13, 2030.

Must anyone who creates derivative work be pre-designated as "authorized" to do so and if so, at what level should the training be?
No, there is no requirement in E.O. 13526 (the Order) to "pre-designate" an individual. Every agency determines the degree of training required with guidance that is provided in 32 CFR Part 2001.70.

If an agency is delegated original classification authority (OCA) from another agency (e.g. the ODNI delegating OCA authority to NRO), which agency reports to the Director of ISOO in accordance with the Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies? Is the ODNI to report, or NRO, or both?
 The agency that delegates the authority reports the delegation.

Who can derivatively mark documents?
Anyone who has a security clearance and access to classified information as part of their job or who is working in a classified environment has derivative authority. They must also have the required derivative training.

Who is responsible for providing Original Classification Authority (OCA) training to those designated specifically by the President?

Those who are responsible to the Senior Agency Official for implementation of the program should provide required training to the OCAs and everyone else in the organization.

 

Frequently Asked Questions GSA Containers

GSA GLOBAL SUPPLY DOCUMENT 

 

What is the Government policy for procuring GSA Approved containers for storing US Government classified information? 

The Government wide policy is documented in Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) Notice 2014-02. New containers can only be purchased through the GSA process. They cannot be purchased from third party vendors, refurbishers, or sales boards such as E:Bay. Containers for storage of classified storage can be transferred or sold from one cleared program to another either within a company or between two separate companies. The concern is that containers that leave a cleared contractor or Government control may be accessed by someone with bad intentions and compromised, so those containers may not be used. Information on the procurement process can be located at the following web sites: https://www.gsa.gov/buying-selling/purchasing-programs/requisition-programs/gsa-global-supply/national-stock-numbers/security-containers/ordering-procedures-for-security-containers and https://www.archives.gov/files/isoo/notices/notice-2014-02.pdf

 

What is the process if a defense contractor needs to purchase a GSA Approved container? 

The contractor ordering process is detailed in documents at the above link.

 

What is the process if a defense contractor wants to purchase a GSA container off contract and with company dollars?

Contractors who need to purchase GSA Approved containers need to follow the process detailed in the ordering procedures even if the purchase is being made with company money.

 

Does it mean contractors cannot just buy containers from any vendor? Can contractors buy used containers?

Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) Notice 2012-04 does not allow the use of used or refurbished containers. All new containers for US Government contractors must be purchased through the specified process. https://www.archives.gov/files/isoo/notices/notice-2012-04.pdf

 

Is there a process to re-certify a GSA approved container that we are unsure of or is missing a label?
https://www.navfac.navy.mil/navfac_worldwide/specialty_centers/exwc/products_and_services/capital_improvements/dod_lock/GSA_SEI_Main.html

 

Is it acceptable to have preventative maintenance performed instead of replacing the safe?

Yes. Allowable maintenance is identified in Federal Standard 809, paragraph 4.2. This does include allowing the replacement of the lock. FED STD 809 can be found at the following web address: https://www.navfac.navy.mil/navfac_worldwide/specialty_centers/exwc/products_and_services/capital_improvements/dod_lock/Documents/DirectivesandGuidance.html

 

What is the disposal process for used containers?

Minimum disposal instructions can be found at the following web address:
https://www.navfac.navy.mil/navfac_worldwide/specialty_centers/exwc/products_and_services

 

Black lettering indicates safes are nearing the end of their expected life. Is there information on when they need to be replaced?

Federal Standard 809D, Section 5, states once a black label GSA-approved security file cabinet is neutralized, it shall not be repaired (Table 1, page 8). It is important to note that the term “neutralized” means the cabinet was locked in the closed condition and it was opened using one of the four neutralization methods described in Federal Standard 809D, Section 6. Per the new “DO NOT REPAIR” statement in Federal Standard 809D, Table 1, once a black label security file cabinet has been neutralized, it cannot be repaired and put back in service protecting classified information. GSA-approved black label security file cabinets that remain in service protecting classified information should continue to be periodically inspected and maintained as described in Federal Standard 809D, Section 4. Specifically, the following routine maintenance and repair procedures can be accomplished on a black label security file cabinet: • The combination lock can be replaced. • The drawer suspensions can be replaced or repaired. • The drawer handles and springs can be replaced or adjusted. • Periodic adjustments (drawer head, thumb latches etc.) and bolt tightening can be accomplished as required.

 

Are older versions of locks previously approved under Federal Specification FF-L-2740B (e.g. X-07, X-08, X-09 still allowed to be used?

All locks previously approved under Federal Specification are still allowed to be used. Be aware that the X-07, X-08 and the early X-09 locks have exceeded their expected life and should be on a considered for replacement.

 

If we had a lock that failed and we need to replace it how do we find an authorized locksmith to replace the lock?

Information on locksmiths who have completed the GSA Safe and Vault Technicians course can be found on the DoD Lock program web page at: https://www.navfac.navy.mil/navfac_worldwide/specialty_centers/exwc/products_and_services/capital_improvements/dod_lock.html

 

Is the DODAAC number issued once to a contractor or is there a different number per contract?

According to PGI251.102-70 a DoDAAC is assigned to a contractor for use per the contract number and is unique to that contract. It expires 24 months beyond contract closeout. DoDAACs are assigned by contract number.

 

Can we use a cabinet owned by our company from other location?

Yes, Containers can be transferred within a company.


Frequently Asked Questions re: National Security Information

What carriers are approved by the NISP as overnight carriers? 

Overnight Express Carriers: These overnight express carriers below meet the requirements outlined In 32 CFR Part 2001 for Federal Executive Branch and the requirements established in DoD Manual 5220.22, NISPOM for cleared contractors for the shipment of CONFIDENTIAL AND SECRET MATERIAL.

Federal Express

United States Postal Service* (See Note 1)

*Note 1 : Sender must verify that the zip code which the package is destined that USPS provides overnight Express services

**Note 2: During this unprecedented time, we need to ensure that classified packages are delivered to a person vice dropped off without a signature.

Due to the pandemic, at this time, USPS registered mail is the only only authorized way to send collateral secret and below information through the U.S. postal service requiring a signature. Do not send any classified material without first ensuring the package will be delivered with the required signature.

If using a commercial carrier, ensure:

  • The release signature block on the receipt label is not to be executed under any circumstances.
  • Any such delivery service is U.S. owned and operated
  • Provides automated in transit tracking of the classified information
  • Ensures package integrity during transit
  • The sender is responsible for ensuring that an authorized person will be available to receive the delivery and verification of the correct mailing address
  • The package may be addressed to the recipient by name
  • The use of external (street side) collection boxes is prohibited

What is a "national security system" (NSS)?

44 USC 3552 (b)(6)(A), Federal Information Security Management Act  of 2014 (FISMA), Public Law 113-283, December 18, 2014, defines a "national security system" as:

Any information system (including any telecommunications system) used or operated by an agency or by a contractor of any agency, or other organization on behalf of an agency, (i) the function, operation, or use of which:

(I) Involves intelligence activities;

(II) Involves cryptologic activities related to national security;

(II) Involves command and control of military forces;

(IV) Involves equipment that is an integral part of a weapon or weapon system; or

(V) Subject to subparagraph B, is critical to the direct fulfillment of military or intelligence missions; or (ii) is protected at all times by procedures established for information that have been specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive Order or an Act of Congress to be kept classified in the interest of national defense or foreign policy.

(B) Subparagraph (A)(i)(V) does not include a system that is to be used for routine administrative and business applications (including payroll, finance, logistics, and personnel management applications).

Can Secret and Confidential information be transmitted by an overnight delivery service within the U.S. and its Territories? 
Yes. Agency heads may, when a requirement exists for overnight delivery within the U.S. and its Territories, authorize the use of the current holder of the General Services Administration contract for overnight delivery of information for the Executive Branch [Ref. Section 2001.46 (c)(2) of 32 C.F.R. Part 2001].

Overnight Express Carriers: These overnight express carriers below meet the requirements outlined In 32 CFR Part 2001 for Federal Executive Branch and the requirements established in DoD Manual 5220.22, NISPOM for cleared contractors for the shipment of CONFIDENTIAL AND SECRET MATERIAL.

Federal Express

USPS *(see note 1)

Where can I get additional information on the NSS, incidents, and spills?

See Federal Incident Reporting Guidelines

Where can I contact the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS)?

See Committee on National Security Systems

 

What is the Purpose of the NDC?

The NDC will shorten the amount of time that it takes to declassify a document.

Who Established the NDC?

The authority for the NDC is Section 3.7 of Executive Order 13526, which was signed by President Obama on December 29, 2009.

Where Can I Go to Learn More?

For additional information, visit NDC. or send a comment, question or concern to [email protected] Additionally, you can visit the NDC blog.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How to Request Archival Materials

A. Are you interested in a specific historical topic?

We recommend that visiting researchers first familiarize themselves with the guide to archival collections maintained by the Security Services Archive. These collections are organized according to their origin and subject and categorized into fourteen basic sections. The guide offers a brief description of the collections, including the types of documents contained therein; in many cases you can also directly view the preliminary inventory books. The search aids also include name, subject and location indexes to facilitate orientation. The guide also indicates the Archive’s departments where the given collection is physically located. If you are interested in studying a specific archive signature, contact the following departments directly:

  • Operative Files and Investigation Files (Oddělení archivních fondů operativních svazků a vyšetřovacích spisů): Praha 4 – Braník, Branické nám. 777/2;
  • Archival Collections of the Federal Ministry of the Interior (Oddělení archivních fondů Federálního ministerstva vnitra): Praha 1, Na Struze 3;
  • Archival Collections of the Armed Forces of the MoI CSR, State Security and Federal MoI (Oddělení archivních fondů vojsk MV ČSR, StB a vojsk MV): Kanice u Brna, P.O. BOX 29, Vlkova 2481/4, 628 00 Brno;

Please indicate in your request where you would like to view the materials: in the reading room at Na Struze in Prague or in Kanice near Brno. It is generally the case that you can study materials from all departments of the Archive of the Security Services in both reading rooms, in Prague and in Brno. If need be or if you do not find anything appropriate on your topic, discuss your requests directly with the relevant department head of the Archive of the Security Services.

We recommend that you book in advance during the holidays.

B. Are you interested in a particular individual or in the operative files of the communist security services?

First look for the information you need, based on the data at your disposal, in the search engines located in the Search by Name section of this website. Then request access to them, via e-mail or otherwise (see below). However, the results of this search are merely indicative and are not necessarily precise.

If you do not find any results, or do not wish to search for the required information yourself, please ask the relevant department of the Archive to find out whether a file on the requested subject (subject of interest or person) is available, stating the basic identification data (name of the subject of interest, the file, or in the case of persons, their given name, surname, and date of birth), and you may then:

  1. Send the information to info@abscr.cz
  2. Send the information by ordinary mail to: ABS – Security Services Archive, P.O. BOX 1430, 111 21, Prague 1
  3. Visit the reading room at Na Struze (Prague) or in Kanice (Brno) where you can submit the information in person
  4. Visit the official entry point (“podatelna”) of the Security Services Archive at Na Struze 3, Praha 1, where your request will be accepted in writing.

Requests for personal or subject files are processed in our registry systems and other search aids acquired by the ABS from the previous holders of these files (Ministry of the Interior, Ministry of Defence, Ministry of Justice), to determine whether there are records produced by the former security services (State Security Service, Intelligence Service of the General Staff of the Czechoslovak People’s Army, Internal Defence Section of the Prison Corps under the Ministry of Justice, Foreign Intelligence) on operative files, including investigation files, personal files or other materials. You will receive a reply to your request and the archival materials will be prepared for viewing in the Na Struze or Kanice reading rooms.

We emphasize that the aforementioned registries do not contain references to all materials lodged with the Security Services Archive, but primarily to operative files.

The investigation files of the former Public Security Service (Veřejná bezpečnost – VB) are not included in these record systems. If you are interested in these, it is necessary to contact directly the department of Archival Collections of the Armed Forces of the MoI CSR, State Security and Federal MoI (No. 3), where they are deposited. It is also important to mention that information on specific individuals does not appear solely in operative files. Valuable information can also be found in the so-called administrative agenda of the individual state security units (work plans, evaluations of activities, reports on proceedings with various issues, summary reports, etc.; “spisový materiál” in Czech). These materials cannot be retrieved through the Archive’s registries, but are available through the general search aids. To view them, we recommend that you familiarize yourself with  Guide to the collections the Archive’s collections and then contact the appropriate Archive department directly. Please bear in mind that in this case, the name and date of birth of a given individual will not suffice. Staff will need to know as much additional data as possible.

Legal note: Most of the Archive’s materials are accessible pursuant to Act No. 499/2004 Coll. on Archival Science and Administrative Records. Before this law came into effect (that is, before 1 January 2005), the informer, operative and personnel files (specifically the personal files of MoI staff) were accessible pursuant to Act No. 140/1996 Coll., amended by Act No. 107/2002 Coll., on the Disclosure of Documents Produced by the State Security Service. Materials accessible before 1 January 2005 pursuant to these laws can be made available to researchers only in digital form (on a computer), with the understanding that some of the data they contain will be anonymous. However, even among these materials, documents that are older than 30 years can be viewed in full.

We assume that many of your research queries will be combined – concerning both themes and particular individuals. In this case the Security Services Archive staff will gladly advise you on how to proceed.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Digital National Security Archive

Collections included:
Afghanistan: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1973–1990
Argentina, 1975-1980: The Making of U.S. Human Rights Policy
The Berlin Crisis, 1958–1962
Chile and the United States: U.S. Policy toward Democracy, Dictatorship, and Human Rights, 1970–1990
China and the United States: From Hostility to Engagement, 1960–1998
CIA Covert Operations: From Carter to Obama, 1977-2010
CIA Covert Operations II: The Year of Intelligence, 1975
CIA Covert Operations III: From Kennedy to Nixon, 1961-1974
CIA Family Jewels Indexed
Colombia and the United States: Political Violence, Narcotics, and Human Rights, 1948-2010
Cuba and the U.S.: The Declassified History of Negotiations to Normalize Relations, 1959-2016
The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962
The Cuban Missile Crisis: 50th Anniversary Update
The Cuban Missile Crisis Revisited: An International Collection, From Bay of Pigs to Nuclear Brink
Death Squads, Guerrilla War, Covert Ops, and Genocide: Guatemala and the United States, 1954-1999
Electronic Surveillance and the National Security Agency: From Shamrock to Snowden
El Salvador: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1977–1984
El Salvador: War, Peace, and Human Rights, 1980–1994
Iran: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1977–1980
The Iran-Contra Affair: The Making of a Scandal, 1983–1988
Iraqgate: Saddam Hussein, U.S. Policy and the Prelude to the Persian Gulf War, 1980–1994
Japan and the United States: Diplomatic, Security, and Economic Relations, 1960–1976
Japan and the United States: Diplomatic, Security, and Economic Relations, 1977–1992
Japan and the United States: Diplomatic, Security, and Economic Relations, Part III, 1961-2000
The Kissinger Conversations, Supplement: A Verbatim Record of U.S. Diplomacy, 1969–1977
The Kissinger Conversations, Supplement II: A Verbatim Record of U.S. Diplomacy, 1969-1977
The Kissinger Telephone Conversations: A Verbatim Record of U.S. Diplomacy, 1969-1977
The Kissinger Transcripts: A Verbatim Record of U.S. Diplomacy, 1969-1977
Mexico-United States Counternarcotics Policy, 1969-2013
The National Security Agency: Organization and Operations, 1945-2009
Nicaragua: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1978–1990
Peru: Human Rights, Drugs and Democracy, 1980-2000
The Philippines: U.S. Policy During the Marcos Years, 1965–1986
Presidential Directives on National Security, Part I: From Truman to Clinton
Presidential Directives on National Security, Part II: From Truman to George W. Bush
The President’s Daily Brief: Kennedy, Johnson, and the CIA, 1961-1969
South Africa: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1962–1989
The Soviet Estimate: U.S. Analysis of the Soviet Union, 1947–1991
Soviet - U.S. Relations: The End of the Cold War, 1985-1991 
Targeting Iraq, Part 1: Planning, Invasion, and Occupation, 1997-2004
Terrorism and U.S. Policy, 1968–2002
U.S. Espionage and Intelligence, 1947–1996
U.S. Intelligence and China: Collection, Analysis and Covert Action
The U.S. Intelligence Community: Organization, Operations and Management, 1947–1989
The U.S. Intelligence Community After 9/11
U.S. Intelligence on Weapons of Mass Destruction: From World War II to Iraqi
U.S. Military Uses of Space, 1945–1991
U.S. Nuclear History, 1969-1976: Weapons, Arms Control, and War Plans in an Age of Strategic Parity
U.S. Nuclear History: Nuclear Arms and Politics in the Missile Age, 1955–1968
U.S. Nuclear Nonproliferation 2, Part 1: From Atoms for Peace to the NPT, 1954-1968
U.S. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Policy, 1945–1991
U.S. Policy in the Vietnam War, Part I: 1954-1968
U.S. Policy in the Vietnam War, Part II: 1969-1975
The United States and the Two Koreas, Part II, 1969-2010
The United States and the Two Koreas (1969-2000)

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Government Sources by Subject: National Security Archive

The National Security Archive index is on CD-ROM. This CD-ROM contains the electronic versions of the twelve collection indexes and guides included in The Making of U.S. Policy series, which contains 35,857 documents (on microfiche). Because it is a networked CD-ROM, you will need to be at a UW Libraries public workstation to view it.

Many of the microfiche are organized by large topic, for example: "Iraqgate: ...(1980-1994)" or "Military Uses of Space, 1946-1991".  It can most easily be found in the UW Libraries Catalog with a keyword search on National Security Archive.

To get a list of all the subject groupings, search under author by entering this exact syntax:  National Security Archive U S.

The microfiche are housed in Government Publications/Maps/Microforms and Newspapers; ask at their help desk on the Ground Floor of Suzzallo Library for assistance in retrieving the microfiche you wish to see. Printed guides accompany the microfiche sets. These topical collections are an excellent means to obtain primary source documents on complex federal government issues.
 

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

National Security Archive

The National Security Archive is a 501(c)(3)non-governmental, non-profit research and archival institution located on the campus of the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1985 to check rising government secrecy, the National Security Archive is an investigative journalism center, open government advocate, international affairs research institute, and the largest repository of declassified U.S. documents outside the federal government.[1] The National Security Archive has spurred the declassification of more than 10 million pages of government documents by being the leading non-profit user of the U.S. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), filing a total of more than 50,000 FOIA and declassification requests in its over 30 years of history.

Organization history and accolades[edit]

Of all the requests made each year to the U.S. National Archives, one item has been requested more than any other: the December 21, 1970, photograph of Elvis Presley and Richard M. Nixon shaking hands during Presley's visit to the White House.
Corrected spelling of Ladin to Laden.
The declassified August 6, 2001, President's Daily Brief warning "Bin Laden Determined to Strike in US."

Journalists and historians founded the National Security Archive in 1985 to enrich research and public debate about national security policy.[1] The National Security Archive continues to challenge national security secrecy by advocating for open government, utilizing the FOIA to compel the release of previously secret government documents, and analyzing and publishing its collections for the public.

As a prolific FOIA requester, the National Security Archive has obtained a host of seminal government documents, including: the most requested still image photograph at the U.S. National Archives – a December 21, 1970 picture of President Richard Nixon's meeting with Elvis Presley;[2] the CIA's "Family Jewels" list that documents decades of the agency's illegal activities;[3] the National Security Agency's (NSA) description of its watch list of 1,600 Americans that included notable Americans such as civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., boxer Muhammad Ali, and politicians Frank Church and Howard Baker;[4] the first official CIA confirmation of Area 51;[5] U.S. plans for a "full nuclear response"[6] in the event the President was ever attacked or disappeared; FBI transcripts of 25 interviews with Saddam Hussein after his capture by U.S. troops in December 2003;[7] the Osama bin Laden File,[8] and the most comprehensive document collections available on the Cold War, including the nuclear flashpoints occurring during the Cuban Missile Crisis and the 1983 "Able Archer" War Scare.[9]

The CIA's declassified map of Groom Lake/Area 51 disclosed to the National Security Archive thanks to a FOIA request.

In 1998, the National Security Archive shared the George Foster Peabody Award for the outstanding broadcast series, CNN's Cold War. In 1999, the National Security Archive won the George Polk Award,[10] for "facilitating thousands of searches for journalists and scholars. The archive, funded by foundations as well as income from its own publications, has become a one-stop institution for declassifying and retrieving important documents, suing to preserve such government data as presidential e-mail messages, pressing for appropriate reclassification of files, and sponsoring research that has unearthed major revelations." In September 2005, the Archive won the Emmy Award for outstanding achievement in news and documentary research.[11] In 2005, Forbes Best of the Web stated that the Archives is  "singlehandedly keeping bureaucrats’ feet to the fire on the Freedom of Information Act." In 2007, the Archive was named one of the ""Top 300 web sites for Political Science," by the International Political Science Association. In February 2011, the National Security Archive won Tufts University's Dr. Jean Mayer Global Citizenship Award[12] for "demystifying and exposing the underworld of global diplomacy and supporting the public's right to know." Journalismdegree.org includes Freedominfo.org on its list of Best Sites for Journalists in 2012. From 2003–2014 the Archive has received 54 citations from the University of Wisconsin's Internet Scout Report recognizing "the most valuable and authoritative resources online."

Funding[edit]

The National Security Archive relies on publication revenues, grants from individuals and grants from foundations such as the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Open Society Foundations, for its $3 million yearly budget. The National Security Archive receives no government funding.[1] Incorporated as an independent Washington, D.C. non-profit organization, the National Security Archive is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a tax-exempt public charity.

Program areas[edit]

The National Security Archive operates eight program areas, each with dedicated funding. The National Security Archive's (1) open government and accountability program receives support from the Open Society Foundations. The Archive's (2) international freedom of information program in priority countries abroad and in the Open Government Partnership has been supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The Archive's (3) human rights evidence program, providing documentation for use by truth commissions and prosecutions, received funding from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The Archive's (4) Latin America program, with projects on Mexico, Chile, Cuba and other countries, is supported by the Ford Foundation, the Reynolds Foundation, and the Coyote Foundation. The Archive's (5) nuclear weapons and intelligence documentation program is supported by the Prospect Hill Foundation, the New-Land Foundation, and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which also funds the Archive's (6) Russia/former Soviet Union program. The National Security Archive has a Russian-language page for their Russian programs. The Archive's (7) Iran program is supported by the Arca Foundation and through a partnership with MIT Center for International Studies. The Archive's (8) publications program, creating public access to declassified documents both online and in book formats, relies on publication royalties from libraries that subscribe to the Digital National Security Archive through the commercial publisher ProQuest.

Publications[edit]

The National Security Archive publishes its document collections in a variety of ways, including on its website, its blog Unredacted, documentary films, formal truth commission and court proceedings, and through the Digital National Security Archive, which contains over 50 digitized collections of more than 94,000 meticulously indexed documents, including the newly-available 'Targeting Iraq, Part I: Planning, Invasion, and Occupation, 1997–2004' and 'Cuba and the U.S.: The Declassified History of Negotiations to Normalize Relations, 1959–2016,' published through ProQuest.

National Security Archive staff and fellows have authored over 70 books, including the winners of the 1996 Pulitzer Prize, the 1995 National Book Award, the 1996 Lionel Gelber Prize, the 1996 American Library Association's James Madison Award Citation, a Boston Globe Notable Book selection for 1999, a Los Angeles Times Best Book of 2003,[13] and the 2010 Henry Adams Prize for outstanding major publication on the federal government's history from the Society for History in the Federal Government.

The National Security Archive regularly publishes Electronic Briefing Books [14] of newsworthy documents on major topics in international affairs on the Archive's website, which attracts more than 2 million visitors each year who download more than 13.3 gigabytes per day. There are currently over 500 briefing books available.

The National Security Archive also frequently posts about declassification and news on its blog, Unredacted.

Lawsuits[edit]

The National Security Archive has participated in over 50 Freedom of Information lawsuits against the U.S. government. The suits have forced the declassification of documents ranging from the Kennedy-Khrushchev letters during the Cuban Missile Crisis[15] to the previously censored photographs of homecoming ceremonies [16] with flag-draped caskets for U.S. casualties of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

In April 2017 the National Security Archive, with the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University and Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), filed a FOIA lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security for the release of the White House visitor logs in the federal District Court for the Southern District of New York on April 14, 2017. In 2017 the Archive was also a co-plaintiff with CREW in a federal suit[17] against Donald Trump for alleged violations of the Presidential Records Act.

The National Security Archive has also settled two seminal lawsuits regarding the preservation of White House emails. The original White House e-mail lawsuit[18] against presidents Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, and Bill Clinton found that e-mail had to be treated as government records, consequently leading to the preservation of more than 30 million White House e-mail messages from the 1980s and 1990s. The second White House e-mail lawsuit, filed in 2007 and settled in 2009,[19] sought the recovery and preservation of more than 5 million White House e-mail messages that were deleted from White House computers between March 2003 and October 2005.

As of October 2018, the National Security Archive and Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington have a pending case[20] in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia against the Donald J. Trump administration's use of messaging applications that can delete conversations or records of conversations which goes against the Presidential Records Act. The suit, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington et al. v. Trump et al., was filed on June 22, 2017. In March 2017, U.S. District Court Judge Christopher R. Cooper ruled that the act gives the president a "substantial degree of discretion" in deciding what should be preserved as a permanent records and it allows the president to destroy records that no longer have "administrative, historical, informational or evidentiary value." The case is currently under appeal.

Audits[edit]

Since 2002, the Archive has carried out annual FOIA audits that are designed after the California Sunshine Survey. These FOIA audits evaluate whether government agencies are in compliance with open-government laws. The surveys include:

  • The Ashcroft Memo: "Drastic" Change or "More Thunder Than Lightning"? [21]
  • Justice Delayed is Justice Denied [22]
  • A FOIA Request Celebrates Its 17th Birthday: A Report on Federal Agency FOIA Backlog [23]
  • Pseudo-Secrets: A Freedom of Information Audit of the U.S. Government's Policies on Sensitive Unclassified Information [24]
  • File Not Found: 10 Years After E-FOIA, Most Federal Agencies are Delinquent [25]
  • 40 Years of FOIA, 20 Years of Delay [26]
  • Mixed Signals, Mixed Results: How President Bush's Executive Order on FOIA Failed to Deliver [27]
  • 2010 Knight Open Government Survey: Sunshine and Shadows [28]
  • 2011 Knight Open Government Survey: Glass Half Full [29]
  • 2011 Knight Open Government Survey: Eight Federal Agencies Have FOIA Requests a Decade Old [30]
  • Outdated Agency Regs Undermine Freedom of Information.[31][32]
  • Half of Federal Agencies Still Use Outdated Freedom of Information Regulations [33]
  • Most Agencies Falling Short on Mandate for Online Records [34]
  • Saving Government Email an Open Question with December 2016 Deadline Looming [35]

Rosemary Award[edit]

Every year the National Security Archive nominates a government agency for the Rosemary Award for worst open government performance. The award is named after President Nixon's secretary, Rose Mary Woods, who erased 18+1⁄2 minutes of a crucial Watergate tape. Past "winners" include the Department of Justice, the Federal Chief Information Officer's Council, the FBI, the Department of the Treasury, the Air Force, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, the Secret Service, the White House and the CIA.[36]

Conferences[edit]

The Archive has organized, sponsored, or co-sponsored a dozen major conferences. These include the historic conferences held in Havana in 2002 and in Budapest in 1996 respectively. For the Havana conference, which took place during the 40th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Cuban president Fidel Castro and former US secretary of defense Robert McNamara discussed newly declassified documents showing that US president John F. Kennedy, in meetings with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev's son-in-law Adzhubei in January 1962, compared the US failure at the Bay of Pigs to the Soviet invasion of Hungary in 1956. The Budapest conference of 1996, carried out by the Archive's "Openness in Russia and East Europe Project" in collaboration with Cold War International History Project and Russian and Eastern European partners, focused on the 1956 uprising was a featured subject at an international conference which the Archive, CWIHP, and the Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung organized in Potsdam on "The Crisis Year 1953 and the Cold War in Europe." Oxford University historian Timothy Garton Ash called the conference "not ordinary at all.... this dramatic confrontation of documents and memories, of written and oral history...."[37]

Other noteworthy conferences the National Security Archive took part in include a conference held in Hanoi in 1997, during which Defense Secretary Robert McNamara met with his Vietnamese counterpart, Gen. Võ Nguyên Giáp, and a series of conferences on U.S.-Iranian relations.

In December 2016 the Archive, with the Carnegie Corporation, the Nuclear Threat Initiative, and the Carnegie Endowment, hosted a conference on the 25th anniversary of the Nunn-Lugar nuclear threat reduction legislation, which helped secure post-Soviet nuclear weapons. The conference, attended by Senators Sam Nunn and Richard Lugar as well as other Nunn-Lugar veterans including Russians, Kazakhs, and Americans, was held in the Kennedy Caucus Room of the U.S. Senate and discussed the future of mutual security and U.S.-Russian relations.

Board[edit]

Based at George Washington University's Gelman Library, the Archive operates under an advisory board that is directed by the Archive's Executive Director, Thomas Blanton, and is overseen by a board of directors.

Board of Directors
  • Chair: Sheila S. Coronel (Director, Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, Graduate School of Journalism, Columbia University; former Director, Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism)
  • Vice Chair: Nancy E. Soderberg (Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Department of Political Science and Public Administration, University of Northern Florida; former Vice President, International Crisis Group; former U.S. Alternate Representative to the United Nations; former Deputy Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs; former Staff Director, National Security Council; appointed Chair of the Public Interest Declassification Board in January 2012)
  • Secretary: Edgar N. James, Esq. (Partner, James & Hoffman; pro bono litigator on behalf of the Archive)
  • Treasurer: Nancy Kranich (Former Associate Dean of Libraries, New York University; Former President, American Library Association)
  • Michael Abramowitz (President, Freedom House; former Director, National Institute for Holocaust Education of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum; former White House Correspondent and National Editor of The Washington Post)
  • Vivian Schiller (Chief Digital Officer, NBC News; former President, National Public Radio; former Senior Vice President, The New York Times Company; former Senior Vice President, The Discovery Times Channel)
  • Cliff Sloan (Partner, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP; Special Envoy for Guantanamo Closure, United States Department of State, 2013–2014; General Counsel of Washingtonpost. Newsweek Interactive, 2000–2008)
  • President: Thomas S. Blanton (Director, National Security Archive)
Advisory Board
  • Dr. Philip Brenner, Ph.D. (Professor of International Relations and former Chair, School of International Service, American University; Lead plaintiff in Archive lawsuit for Cuban Missile Crisis documents)
  • Susan Brynteson (University Librarian, University of Delaware; Former Chair, American Library Association Intellectual Freedom Committee)
  • Dr. Anne Cahn, Ph.D. (Member of the Board of Directors, United States Institute of Peace; Author of Killing Détente; former Director, Committee on National Security; former Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and Department of Defense staffer)
  • Rosemary Chalk (National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences)
  • John Dinges (Professor, Columbia University School of Journalism; former Managing Editor, National Public Radio; Archive Fellow and Author of Our Man in Panama)
  • Herbert N. Foerstel (Retired University Librarian, University of Maryland; Author of Secret Science and Surveillance in the Stacks; Member, American Library Association Intellectual Freedom Committee)
  • Dr. Joan Hoff, Ph.D. (Professor of History and Chair of the Baker Institute, Ohio University; former Executive Secretary, Organization of American Historians)
  • Dr. Akira Iriye, Ph.D. (Professor of History, Harvard University; Past President, American Historical Association)
  • Dr. David Alan Rosenberg, Ph.D. (Professor of Maritime Strategy, National War College; Former MacArthur Fellow)
  • Tina Rosenberg, (New York Times Editorial Board; Former MacArthur Fellow; Former Archive Fellow and Pulitzer Prize winner for her book The Haunted Land)
  • Jack Siggins (University Librarian, The George Washington University)
  • Thomas Susman, Esq. (Partner, Ropes & Gray; Former counsel, U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee; Co-author of the 1974 Freedom of Information Act amendments)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc"About the National Security Archive". The National Security Archive.
  2. ^"The Nixon-Presley Meeting". The National Security Archive.
  3. ^Thomas Blanton. "The CIA's Family Jewels". The National Security Archive.
  4. ^Nate Jones (25 September 2013). "FOIA Request Filed for National Security Agency Watch List that Included "Threats" MLK, Muhammad Ali, and Senator Church". Unredacted.
  5. ^Jeffrey T. Richelson (15 August 2013). "The Secret History of the U-2 — and Area 51". The National Security Archive.
  6. ^William Burr (12 December 2012). "U.S. Had Plans for "Full Nuclear Response" In Event President Killed or Disappeared during an Attack on the United States". The National Security Archive.
  7. ^Joyce Battle (1 July 2009). "Saddam Hussein Talks to the FBI". The National Security Archive.
  8. ^"The Osama Bin Laden File". The National Security Archive. 2 May 2011.
  9. ^Nate Jones (7 November 2013). "Able Archer 83 Sourcebook". The National Security Archive.
  10. ^"National Security Archive Wins 1999 George Polk Award for Journalism". The National Security Archive.[verification needed]
  11. ^"National Security Archive Wins 2005 Emmy Award". The National Security Archive.[verification needed]
  12. ^"Annual Report for 2011"(PDF). The National Security Archive.[verification needed]
  13. ^"The Pinochet File A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountability". The New Press. Archived from the original on 2012-03-01.
  14. ^"Electronic Briefing Books". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  15. ^Robert Pear (January 7, 1992). "The Cuba Missile Crisis: Kennedy Left a Loophole". The New York Times.
  16. ^"Return of the Fallen". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  17. ^"CREW and National Security Archive v Trump"(PDF). 2017-06-22. Retrieved 2017-06-24.
  18. ^"National Security Archive/White House E-Mail". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  19. ^"Untold Story of the Bush White House Emails". Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. Archived from the original on 2014-01-06.
  20. ^Saul, Josh (June 22, 2017). "Trump Sued for Deleting Tweets and White House use of Encrypted Messaging Apps". Newsweek.
  21. ^Michael Evans (2003-03-14). "FOIA Audit – Press Release". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  22. ^Michael Evans (2003-11-17). "Justice Delayed is Justice Denied". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  23. ^"Press Release: A FOIA Request Celebrates Its 17th Birthday". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  24. ^"Press Release – Pseudo-Secrets: A Freedomf of Information Audit of the U.S. Government's Policies on Sensitive Unclassified Information". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  25. ^Thomas Blanton (March 12, 2007). "File Not Found: 10 Years After E-FOIA, Most Federal Agencies are Delinquent". The National Security Archive. Archived from the original on 2013-09-08.
  26. ^"40 Years of FOIA, 20 Years of Delay". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  27. ^"Mixed Signals, Mixed Results: How President Bush's Executive Order on FOIA Failed to Deliver". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  28. ^"The National Security Archive : Sunshine and Shadows:The Clear Obama Message for Freedom of Information Meets Mixed Results". Gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  29. ^"Glass Half Full - The Knight Open Government Survey 2011". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  30. ^"Eight Federal Agencies Have FOIA Requests a Decade Old, According to Knight Open Government Survey". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  31. ^"Freedom of Information Regulations: Still Outdated, Still Undermining Openness". .gwu.edu. Retrieved 2015-04-30.
  32. ^Josh Hicks (December 4, 2012). "Agencies lag on transparency, report says". The Washington Post.
  33. ^"Half of Federal Agencies Still Use Outdated Freedom of Information Regulations". nsarchive2.gwu.edu.
  34. ^"Most Agencies Falling Short on Mandate for Online Records". nsarchive2.gwu.edu.
  35. ^"Saving Government Email an Open Question with December 2016 Deadline Looming - National Security Archive". nsarchive.gwu.edu.
  36. ^"Federal Chief Information Officers (CIO) Council Wins Rosemary Award". National Security Archive.
  37. ^"Praise and Comments about the Openness Project". The National Security Archive.

External links[edit]

  • National Security Archive
  • NSA Director Tom Blanton speaks on "Secrecy in the United States: Priorities for the Next President", Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service, Suffolk University Law School, October 12, 2008
  • C-SPAN Q&A interview with Tom Blanton, December 23, 2007
  • Presidential Records at the U.S. National Archives
  • Complaint, Docket 1 (PDF), No. 1:17-cv-01228, D.D.C., Jun 22, 2017

Coordinates: 38°54′03″N77°02′47″W / 38.9007°N 77.0463°W / 38.9007; -77.0463

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Hidden Galleries Digital Archive

1. History of Foundation
When Ukraine achieved independence in 1991, the Ukrainian KGB archive was inherited by the Security Services of Ukraine (SBU). On 1 April 1994 the archive was institutionalised as the State Archive of the SBU and became part of the National Archival Fond of Ukraine. In 2015, the SBU archive was placed under the jurisdiction of the Ukrainian Institute of National Remembrance. This allowed for the gradual declassification of its documents. The SBU archive consists of the central branch located in Kiev and regional offices located in all the regions of Ukraine.

The State Archive Branch of the Security Services of Ukraine includes materials starting from the 1920s. These were inherited from the Central Registry Department at the Secret Operational Directorate within the OGPU in Moscow, which collected and preserved internal documents of the Soviet secret police. A similar archival department was set up as part of the Ukrainian branch of the Soviet security services in 1925. In the following years, with a series of restructuring reforms of the Soviet secret political police and intelligence agencies, the archive was reorganized as the First Special Department within the NKVD in 1930, later the Department “A” within the MGB, and finally the 10th Department within the KGB.

2. Legal Commission and Task
The former KGB archive served solely operational needs of secret police officers, hence was unavailable for anyone else (with a few exceptions of special authorization for state-party leaders). Until the end of the Soviet period, the archive was fully classified (most of the documents were sealed with “secret” and “top secret” stamps). In 2015, on the wave of the Euromaidan Revolution, the Parliament of Ukraine adopted a series of “Decommunization” laws, among which was the law “On Access to the Archives of Repressive Bodies of the Communist Totalitarian Regime from 1917–1991”. The new legislation became a basis for a full declassification of Soviet-era archival collections held in the SBU archive.

The SBU archives has the following tasks: ensuring broad access to historical information on the communist totalitarian regime that operated on the territory of the present-day Ukraine during the XX century; promotion of a better understanding of recent history in order to prevent conflicts and the repetition of crimes of totalitarian regimes in the future; restoration of historical and social justice.

3. Material relevant to the study of religion
Nowadays the SBU archives houses the documents of the former Soviet security services dating from 1918 (when the Ukrainian CheKa was created) to 1991. Altogether, the archive holds over 844 million documents in 85 fonds (archival collections) with the following types of documents:
- CheKa–KGB legal acts, administrative documents and correspondence
- Information, statistic accounts and analytical documents (like surveys and generalized information on political, social, economic, cultural and religious life in Ukraine and Ukrainian diaspora)
- Criminal cases of repressed people
- Operative investigation files and agent-operational files
- Personal files of agents and former employees
- Publishing collection
- Collection of film and photo documents

The following archival collections are of particular importance for the study of religion:
- Fond 16, reports from the head of the Ukrainian KGB to the Ukrainian Council of Ministers and the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine. They include information on secret operations, investigation, arrests and trials of religious figures and communities
- Fond 3 of the Fifth Directorate within MGB/KGB, which since 1950 was also tasked with fighting the “anti-Soviet element” among the clergy and sectarians.
- Fond 1 of the Second Directorate and Fond 2 of the Fourth Directorate hold reports on agent-operational work among the clergy and sectarians from the post-war period
- Fond 6 includes criminal cases of repressed and later rehabilitated religious figures
- Fond 13 has a collection of published reports and brochures related to the repression of various religious groups
- Fond 42 holds the file “Troika” on the deportation of Jehovah’s Witnesses from Ukraine in 1951

4. Other online resources containing materials from the SBU archive:

- Free online-course on how to work with the documents from the SBU archive:

Renaissance

- The Institute of National Memory:

Guide to SBU archive

- Open access periodical:

From the Archives of the VUChK-GPU-NKVD-MGB-KGB

- Online database with documents from the SBU archives:

Rehabilitated by History

5. Access for Researchers
Researchers can apply to become an accredited researcher with access to the reading room by filing an application form and emailing it to [email protected] The administration normally responds within 30 days.

Application form

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Security considerations

One of the priorities in any move of records and other information following a transfer of functions is information security.

Security provision should be proportionate to the nature, contents and sensitivity level of the information and should conform to the principles of the Security Policy Framework (SPF), ensuring that confidentiality, integrity and availability of information is appropriately maintained.

Any transferring organisation should satisfy itself that the receiving organisation has the necessary accreditation, infrastructure, procedures and policies in place, that is the capacity to hold and protect the material, and the organisational culture to treat it appropriately. Commercial and other partners who may be involved in handling the move of records should follow the same principles and practice.

Step one

Identify what material should be transferred to the receiving organisation and the nature of any risks associated, for example, with regards sensitivity or personal data.

Step two

Assess whether the receiving organisation meets appropriate security requirements or if existing information communications technology (ICT) infrastructure, policies and procedures will need to be revised or upgraded. This should be done by or under the auspices of the Departmental Security Officer (DSO)s concerned and guidance on accreditation and the implementation of information assurance (IA) and risk management should be sought from CESG, who are the UK’s National Technical Authority for IA. Organisations should also follow Office of the Government Senior Information Risk Owner (OGSIRO)’s guidance on managing information risk.

 Step three

Only when any necessary upgrading or implementation of appropriate security measures has taken place should the material be moved. The method of transit and the security measures employed to protect the information during the move should conform to the principles of the SPF and relevant CESG IA Standards and Guidance.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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