What’s New In? Archives

What’s New In? Archives

Please share your feedback about our new Special Collections and Archives Portal. 11.03.2021 What's New in Special Collections and Archives. people are looking for evidence of what it means to be a Canadian. *New* archival descriptions and digitized products are added regularly. It was made possible through generous funding from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation in New York. These finding aids are also available through ArchiveGrid.

What’s New In? Archives - consider

In homes, schools and libraries across Canada, people are looking for evidence of what it means to be a Canadian. ARCHIVESCANADA.ca is a gateway to archival resources found in over 800 repositories across Canada--it's your gateway to Canada's collective memory!

 

Through ARCHIVESCANADA.ca you can:

  • Search archival holdings across Canada
  • Access Provincial and Territorial Archival Networks
  • View digitized photographs, maps and other documents about Canada's history

*New* archival descriptions and digitized products are added regularly.

 

ARCHIVESCANADA.ca is an official archival portal maintained by the  Canadian Council of Archives (CCA), and is a joint initiative of CCA, the Provincial and Territorial Archival Networks, and Library and Archives Canada (LAC). All archival descriptions and links contained in the searchable database are provided by provincial and territorial councils, their members, and LAC.

We welcome your feedback.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

What Are Archives?

What Are Archives?

The word archives can be used in three different ways:

  • The word archives (usually written with a lower case a and sometimes referred to in the singular, as archive) refers to the permanently valuable records—such as letters, reports, accounts, minute books, draft and final manuscripts, and photographs—of people, businesses, and government. These records are kept because they have continuing value to the creating agency and to other potential users. They are the documentary evidence of past events. They are the facts we use to interpret and understand history.
  • An Archives (often written with a capital A and usually, but not always, in the plural) is an organization dedicated to preserving the documentary heritage of a particular group: a city, a province or state, a business, a university, or a community. For example, the National Archives and Records Administration in the United States, Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan, The Coca-Cola Company Archives, and The Archives of the Episcopal Church are all responsible for the preservation and management of archives.
  • The word archives is also used to refer to the building or part of a building in which archival materials are kept, i.e., the archival repository itself.

Excerpted from The Story Behind the Book: Preserving Authors’ and Publishers’ Archives by Laura Millar

What’s an Archivist?

In the course of everyday life, individuals, organizations, and governments create and keep information about their activities. These records may be personal and unplanned—a photograph, a letter to a friend, notes toward a manuscript—or they may be official and widely shared—financial and legal documents, recordings of public speeches, medical files, and electronic records. These records, and the places in which they are kept, are called archives, and archivists are the professionals who assess, collect, organize, preserve, and provide access to these records.

The Work of Archivists

Archivists hold professional positions requiring adherence to national and international standards of practice and conduct in accordance with a professional code of ethics. The majority of professional archivists hold a baccalaureate degree, and many have one or more advanced degrees related to the profession.

Assess: Not every record has enduring value, and archivists don’t keep every record that comes their way. Instead, archivists select records, a process that requires an understanding of the historical context in which the records were created, the uses for which they were intended, and their relationships to other sources.

Collect and Organize: Archivists arrange and describe the collection of records, in accordance with national and international standards of practice.

Preserve: Because materials in archival collections are unique, specialized, or rare, archivists strive to protect records from physical damage and theft so that they can be used today and in the future. Increasingly archivists play a key role in ensuring that digital records, which may quickly grow obsolete, will be available when needed in the future.

Provide Access: Archivists identify the essential evidence of our society and ensure its availability for use by students, teachers, researchers, organization leaders, historians, and a wide range of individuals with information needs. Many archivists also plan and direct exhibitions, publications, and other outreach programs to broaden the use of collections, helping people find and understand the information they need.

Archivists and Other Professions

Archivists are sometimes confused with other closely related professionals, such as librarians, records managers, curators, and historians. This is not surprising, as many archivists share a location, materials, or goals with these professions. Although some work is related, distinct differences exist in the work of the archivist.  
Librarians and Archivists: Both professionals collect, preserve, and make accessible materials for research, but they differ significantly in the way they arrange, describe, and use the materials in their collections. Materials in archival collections are unique and often irreplaceable, whereas libraries can usually obtain new copies of worn-out or lost books.

Records Managers and Archivists: The records manager controls vast quantities of institutional records, most of which are needed in the short term and will eventually be destroyed. The archivist is concerned with relatively small quantities of records deemed important enough to be retained for an extended period.

Museum Curators and Archivists: Although their materials sometimes overlap, the museum curator collects, studies, and interprets mostly three-dimensional objects, while the archivist works primarily with paper, film, audio, and electronic records. Selections from an archives may be exhibited in a museum.

Historians and Archivists: These two professions have a longstanding partnership. The archivist identifies, preserves, and makes records accessible for use; the historian uses archival records for research.

Archivists in the World

Archival records serve to strengthen collective memory and protect people’s rights, property, and identity. For example, historians and genealogists rely on archival sources to analyze past events and reconstruct family histories; businesses use the records to improve their public relations and promote new products; medical researchers utilize records to study patterns of diseases; Native Americans may use archival records to establish legal claims to land and privileges guaranteed by federal and state governments; and authors use archives to acquire a feel for the people and times about which they are writing. In short, archives benefit nearly everyone—even those who have not used them directly.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Library and Archives Canada

National library and archive of Canada

Library and Archives Canada.JPG

Library and Archives Canada building in Ottawa

TypeNational library and
national archives
Established2004
Location395 Wellington St, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0N4
Items collectedAboriginal magazines; albums and scrapbooks; architectural drawings; art; artifacts; Canadian children's literature; Canadian comic books; Canadian newspapers; Canadian periodicals; electronic publications; electronic records; English-language pulp literature; ethnic community newsletters; ephemera; fiction and non-fiction; films; globes; government publications; government records; government websites; Hebraica and Judaica; Indian residential school records; journals and diaries; livres d’artistes; manuscripts; maps; microfilms; photographs; poetry; portraits; rare books; sheet music; sketchbooks; sound recordings; stamps; textual archives; theses and dissertations; trade catalogues; videos[1]
Size22 million books and publications (periodicals, newspapers, microfilms, literary texts, and government publications); 250 km of government and private textual records; 3 million architectural drawings, maps, and plans; 30 million photos; 350,000 hours of film; 425,000 works of art (including paintings, drawings, watercolours, posters, prints, medals, and caricatures); 547,000 musical items; over 1 billion MB of digital content[2][3]
Criteria for collectionCanadiana, documents published in Canada and materials published elsewhere of interest to Canada; records documenting the functions and activities of the Government of Canada; records of heritage value that document the historical development and diversity of Canadian society[5]
Legal depositYes[4]
BudgetCDN$98,346,695 (2013–14)[6][7]
DirectorLeslie Weir[8]
Staff860 FTE (2013–14)[7]
Minister responsible
Parent agencyCanadian Heritage
Key document
Websitewww.bac-lac.gc.ca

Library and Archives Canada (LAC; French: Bibliothèque et Archives Canada) is a federal institution tasked with acquiring, preserving, and providing accessibility to the documentary heritage of Canada.[9] It is the fifth largest library in the world.

LAC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage, whose incumbent has been Steven Guilbeault since November 20, 2019. Genealogists account for 70% of LAC's clients.[11]

History and mandate[edit]

The Dominion Archives was founded in 1872 as a division within the Department of Agriculture tasked with acquiring and transcribing documents related to Canadian history. In 1912, the division was transformed into an autonomous organization, Public Archives of Canada, with the new responsibility of managing government documents on all types of media.[12] The organization would be renamed in 1987 as the National Archives of Canada.[12]

With the efforts of people like Freda Farrell Waldon, the first president of the Canadian Library Association,[13][14] the National Library of Canada was founded in 1953.[12]

In 2004, under the initiative of former National Librarian Roch Carrier and National Archivist Ian E. Wilson, the functions of the National Archives of Canada and the National Library of Canada were combined to form the Library and Archives Canada (LAC).[12][15][16][17] The LAC was established per the Library and Archives of Canada Act (Bill C-8), proclaimed on April 22, 2004, with a subsequent Order-in-Council on May 21 which formally united the collections, services, and personnel of the National Archives of Canada and the National Library of Canada.[18] Wilson assumed the position as the first Librarian and Archivist of Canada in July that year.

Since its inception, LAC has reported to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.[19] LAC's stated mandate is:[9][8][20]

  • to preserve the documentary heritage of Canada for the benefit of present and future generations;
  • to be a source of enduring knowledge accessible to all, contributing to the cultural, social and economic advancement of Canada as a free and democratic society;
  • to facilitate in Canada co-operation among communities involved in the acquisition, preservation and diffusion of knowledge;
  • to serve as the continuing memory of the Government of Canada and its institutions.

LAC is expected to maintain "effective recordkeeping practices that ensure transparency and accountability".[21]

Collection[edit]

LAC's holdings include:[2]

  • 250 linear kilometres of Canadian Government and representative private textual records
    • textual archives for various individuals and groups who have contributed to the cultural, social, economic and political development of Canada
  • 22 million books and publications acquired largely through legal deposit
  • 24 million photographic images (including prints, negatives, slides, and digital photos)
  • over 3 million architectural drawings, plans, and maps
  • over 90,000 films (including short and full-length films, documentaries, and silent films)
  • over 550,000 hours of audio and video recordings
  • over 425,000 works of art (including watercolours, oil paintings, sketches, caricatures and miniatures, as well as medals, seals, posters and coats of arms)
  • about 550,000 musical items (including the largest collection of Canadian sheet music in the world; documentation related to music in Canada; and recordings on disks and records of all formats, including piano rolls, reels and spools, and 8-track tapes)
  • the Canadian Postal Archives;
  • national newspapers from across Canada, including daily newspapers, student newspapers, Indigenous magazines, and ethnic community newsletters.

Notable items in the collection include:[22]

Digitization[edit]

The LAC also houses more than a petabyte of digital content.[2][30] Some of this content is available online, primarily books, Canadian theses, and census material—equating to around 5 thousand terabytes of information in electronic format.[31][32] Many items have not been digitized and are only available in physical form.[33] As of May 2013, only about 1% of the collection had been digitized, representing "about 25 million of the more popular and most fragile items."[34][35][36]

Facilities[edit]

Preservation Centre,
625 du Carrefour Boulevard, Gatineau

The building at 395 Wellington Street in downtown Ottawa is the main physical location where the public may access the collection in person. The building was officially opened on June 20, 1967.[33][37] With the de-emphasis on physical visits, in-person services have been curtailed—for example, since April 2012, reference services are by appointment only—and the role of this building is decreasing.[38][39][40] There are also administrative offices in Gatineau, Quebec, and preservation and storage facilities throughout Canada for federal government records.[33][22][41][42]

The Preservation Centre in the city centre of Gatineau, about 10 kilometres away from the Ottawa headquarters, was designed to provide a safe environment for the long-term storage and preservation of Canada's valuable collections. It was built at a cost of CDN$107 million, and the official opening took place on June 4, 1997. It is a unique building containing 48 climate-controlled preservation vaults and state-of-the-art preservation laboratories.[41][43][44][45] In 2000, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada named it one of the top 500 buildings constructed in Canada during the last millennium.[46]

A Nitrate Film Preservation Facility on the Communications Research Centre campus in Shirleys Bay, on the outskirts of Ottawa, houses Canada's cellulose nitrate film collection.[47] The collection contains 5,575 film reels dating back to 1912, including some of the first Canadian motion pictures and photographic negatives.[22][48] The film material is highly sensitive and requires precise temperatures for its preservation. The state-of-the-art facility, which was officially opened on June 21, 2011,[49] is an eco-designed building featuring an environmentally friendly roof that provides better insulation and minimizes energy expenditures.[50]

A planned key activity for 2013–14 was to rehouse analogue (non-digital) information resources in a new state-of-the-art high-density storage facility in Gatineau, where the national newspaper collection and records of Second World War veterans will be stored.[7][51] The facility will feature a high bay metal shelving system with a suitable environment to better protect Canada's published heritage.[52][53][54] In January 2019, Library and Archives Canada announced that negotiations for a new facility to be built next to the existing one in Gatineau were starting, with an opening date in 2022.[55]

LAC's online collection is accessible via its website and LAC provides ongoing information online via its blog, podcasts, the Twitter and Facebooksocial networking services, the Flickrimage-sharing site, and the YouTubevideo-sharing site. RSS feeds provide links to new content on the LAC website and news about LAC services and resources.[31][56][57] A new modernized website is being developed and is scheduled for completion in 2013, with both new and old websites accessible during the transition period.[58]

Modernization and budget cuts[edit]

In June 2004, LAC issued a discussion paper titled Creating a New Kind of Knowledge Institution;[59] after consultation in June 2006, it issued LAC Directions for Change, a document setting out five key directions to define the new institution:[60]

  • A new kind of knowledge institution
  • A truly national institution
  • Working with others to strengthen the whole of Canada's documentary heritage
  • A prime learning destination
  • A lead institution in government information management.

LAC's modernization policy provides for transformation from an institution focused on the acquisition and preservation of analogue (non-digital) materials to one that excels in digital access and digital preservation.[61] A Documentary Heritage Management Framework developed in 2009 seeks the right balance between resources dedicated to analogue and digital materials and is based on:

  • three main business pillars: acquisition, preservation and resource discovery (resource discovery includes description, discovery, access and services to the public)
  • four guiding principles for fulfilling its documentary heritage mandate, i.e. significance, sufficiency, sustainability and society (broad social context)
  • four key roles, i.e. foundation building (relationship building), collaboration, program (integrated collection management processes) and transfer (formal agreements with third parties to fulfill its legislated mandate).

Eight pilot research projects were initiated to validate the framework, including projects on military documentary heritage, aboriginal documentary heritage, and stewardship of newspapers in a digital age.[62][63][64] In March 2010 LAC issued its final report on Canadian Digital Information Strategy stakeholder consultations initiated in accordance with its mandate to facilitate co-operation among Canadian knowledge communities.[65] In the same month it issued Shaping Our Continuing Memory Collectively: A Representative Documentary Heritage, a document which outlines how it plans to achieve its modernization objectives.[66]

Despite LAC's stated objectives of continuing to fulfill its mandate by adapting to changes in the information environment and collaboration with others, the actual experience since 2004 has been a reduction in both services and collaboration.[61][62][67] Federal funding cuts since 2004 have also impacted on LAC services and acquisitions.[35][36][67][68][69] A detailed timeline of relevant developments and the decline in LAC services since 2004 has been compiled by the Ex Libris Association.[70]

Impact on employees[edit]

Following the announcement in the 2012 federal budget of a CDN$9.6 million funding cut over the three years commencing in 2012–13,[71] more than 400 LAC employees received notices which indicated their jobs may be affected and the department announced a 20% reduction of its workforce of about 1,100 over the following three years.[40][72][73][74] The "harsh" wording of a 23-page code of conduct for employees effective January 2013, which "spells out values, potential conflicts of interest and expected behaviours", has been criticized by the Association of Canadian Archivists and the Canadian Association of University Teachers among others. The code describes personal activities including teaching and speaking at or attending conferences as "high risk" activities "with regard to conflict of interest, conflict of duties and duty of loyalty" and participation in such activities is subject to strict conditions. In a section on duty of loyalty, it also cautions employees about expressing personal opinions in social media forums. Only authorized LAC spokespersons may issue statements or make public comments about LAC's mandate and activities, which includes controversial changes related to modernization and budget cuts.[75][76][77][78]

Public criticism[edit]

Changes introduced under the management of Ian E. Wilson and Daniel J. Caron have been the subject of controversy and public criticism.[67][79] Caron asserted that radical change is needed to cope with the influx and demand for digital material and they are subject to federal budget constraints.[78][80]

Following Caron's resignation in May 2013, a stakeholder coalition issued a joint statement on the qualities of a successful Librarian and Archivist of Canada for official consideration in what they consider a "matter of great national significance":[79][87]

A broad coalition of Canadian stakeholder organizations has developed the following list of qualities we believe the Librarian and Archivist of Canada should have in order to be successful in this critical position of public trust and responsibility. We believe it is essential that the person appointed to this position at this time possess the necessary qualities to meet the tremendous challenges of dealing with the complex issues of the digital environment in an era of limited financial and human resources and the demands of providing increased public access to the irreplaceable treasures of Canadian documentary heritage.

In June 2013 the Heritage Minister said speeding up the digitization of records will be a priority for the new Librarian and Archivist of Canada. Moore also said he will ask the person appointed to revisit the termination of the National Archival Development Program.[68][69]

Truth and Reconciliation Commission[edit]

During the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Library and Archives Canada initially failed to produce records requested by the commission in a timely and comprehensive manner and was ordered by an Ontario Superior Court judge to do so.[88] Ultimately, LAC did provide the records, but many were not in digitized and searchable formats as required by the commission.[89]

The Calls to Action of the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission explicitly referenced Library and Archives Canada as follows:

We call upon Library and Archives Canada to: fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations Joinet-Orentlicher principles, as related to Aboriginal peoples' inalienable right to know the truth about what happened and why, with regard to human rights violations committed against them in the residential schools; ensure that its record holding related to residential schools are accessible to the public; [and] commit more resources to its public education materials and programming on residential schools.[90][91]

Library and Archives Canada has begun to address these concerns by dedicating funding to hire Indigenous archivists, build relationships with Indigenous communities, and support digitization efforts.[92] However, Indigenous-led organizations have drawn attention to the fact that Indigenous communities have been conducting this type of work for decades.[93]

LAC also holds and provides access to archival copies of the websites of organizations related to the TRC, in collaboration with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation,[94] the University of Winnipeg Library, and University of Manitoba Libraries.[95]

Librarians and Archivists[edit]

The Librarian and Archivist of Canada has the same seniority level as a deputy minister of a federal department.[8]

On May 27, 2019, Leslie Weir was appointed Librarian and Archivist of Canada for a four-year term commencing August 30, 2019.[96] Weir is the first woman to hold this role.[97]

The head of Canada's national archives was known as the Dominion Archivist from 1872 to 1987 and the National Archivist from 1987 to 2004.[98]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Discover the Collection: Canada's Continuing Memory – Browse by Product Type". LAC. Archived from the original on June 3, 2013. Retrieved June 2, 2013.
  2. ^ abc"LAC at a glance – About Us". LAC. Retrieved May 29, 2013.
  3. ^"Infographic," Library and Archives Canada (November 9, 2016)
  4. ^"Legal Deposit". LAC. Archived from the original on May 30, 2013. Retrieved May 28, 2013.
  5. ^"Digital Collection Development Policy". LAC. February 1, 2006. Retrieved June 2, 2013. Refer section on Selection and Acquisition Criteria applicable to both digital and other media.
  6. ^"2013–14 Estimates"(PDF). Treasury Board Secretariat. p. II–201. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  7. ^ abc"Report on Plans and Priorities 2013–14". LAC. December 19, 2012. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  8. ^ abc"Organization Profile – Library and Archives of Canada". Governor in Council Appointments. Government of Canada. June 5, 2014. Retrieved July 1, 2014.
  9. ^ abc"Justice Laws Website: An Act to establish the Library and Archives of Canada, to amend the Copyright Act and to amend certain Acts in consequence". Government of Canada. Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  10. ^"House Government Bill – C-8, Royal Assent (37-3)". Parliament of Canada. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  11. ^Shouldice, Alison (July 1, 2013). "Release of 1921 census data on hold". The Kingston Whig-Standard. Retrieved July 9, 2013.
  12. ^ abcd"Library and Archives Canada". Canada–France Archives. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  13. ^"Waldon, Freda Farrell". Hamilton Public Library. Retrieved April 12, 2021.
  14. ^"History of LH&A: Freda Farrell Waldon | HPL". Hpl.ca. Retrieved August 11, 2016.
  15. ^Wilson, Ian E. (1982). "'A Noble Dream': The Origins of the Public Archives of Canada". Archivaria. ACA (15): 16–35. Retrieved June 3, 2013.
  16. ^"Speech – Posthumous Tribute to Jean-Pierre Wallot". Government of Canada. March 26, 2012. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  17. ^Snyder, Lorraine. [2006 February 7] 2015 June 5. "Library and Archives Canada." The Canadian Encyclopedia. Historica Canada.
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  19. ^"Financial Administration Act – Schedule I.1". Government of Canada. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
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  35. ^ abHall, Joseph (March 10, 2013). "Historical letters not wanted at Library and Archives Canada, critics say". Toronto Star. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  36. ^ abCobb, Chris (May 3, 2013). "Record breaking". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on May 30, 2013. Retrieved June 2, 2013.
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  40. ^ abCurry, Bill (May 1, 2012). "Visiting Library and Archives in Ottawa? Not without an appointment". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
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  53. ^"Montel Awarded the Library and Archives Canada New Collection Storage Facility High Bay Metal Storage Shelving Contract". Montel. January 18, 2012. Retrieved May 27, 2013.
  54. ^Butler, Don (February 28, 2013). "Museums mostly unconcerned about loss of federal funding". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on June 30, 2013. Retrieved May 27, 2013.
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  64. ^Levene, Mark (2010). "Documentary Heritage Development Framework"(PDF). LAC. Archived from the original(PDF) on July 3, 2014. Retrieved June 5, 2013.
  65. ^"Canadian Digital Information Strategy (CDIS): Final Report of consultations with stakeholder communities 2005 to 2008"(PDF). LAC. Archived from the original(PDF) on December 22, 2013. Retrieved June 5, 2013.
  66. ^"Shaping Our Continuing Memory Collectively: A Representative Documentary Heritage"(PDF). LAC. Retrieved June 5, 2013.
  67. ^ abc"Stephen Harper should appoint a pro to head Canada's library and archives: Editorial". Toronto Star. May 21, 2013. Retrieved June 5, 2013.
  68. ^ abc"Heritage minister looks at restoring local archives program". CBC. June 10, 2013. Retrieved June 11, 2013.
  69. ^ abcCobb, Chris (June 10, 2013). "Heritage Minister James Moore wants axed Library and Archives Canada NADP program restored". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on June 19, 2013. Retrieved June 11, 2013.
  70. ^"Ex Libris Association Timeline on Library and Archives Canada Service Decline". Ex Libris Association. Retrieved March 18, 2017.
  71. ^"National museums, Canada Council spared cuts". CBC News. March 29, 2012. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  72. ^"Federal libraries, archives shutting down". CBC News. May 2, 2012. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  73. ^ abFontaine, Alana (May 2, 2012). "CLA dismayed by impact of budget cuts on federal libraries" (Press release). CLA. Archived from the original on November 16, 2012. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  74. ^ abKirkup, Kristy (May 2, 2012). "Librarians fighting mad over federal cuts". Ottawa Sun. Retrieved April 22, 2013.
  75. ^Munro, Margaret (March 15, 2013). "Federal librarians fear being 'muzzled' under new code of conduct that stresses 'duty of loyalty' to the government". National Post. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  76. ^Fodden, Simon (March 19, 2013). "The Loyalty Policy at Library and Archives Canada". Slaw. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  77. ^Munro, Margaret (March 20, 2013). "Federal librarians face new 'behaviour regulation' code". The Regina Leader-Post. Archived from the original on June 29, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
  78. ^ abCobb, Chris (May 12, 2013). "Library and Archives boss chastised by heritage minister for taxpayer-funded Spanish lessons". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on June 30, 2013. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  79. ^ abKarstens-Smith, Gemma (May 24, 2013). "Librarians give heritage minister wishlist for top job". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on June 30, 2013. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  80. ^ abCobb, Chris (May 16, 2013). "Librarian community calls on minister to appoint professional librarian to replace Caron as head of LAC". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on June 30, 2013. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  81. ^"Save Library & Archives Canada". CAUT. Retrieved April 22, 2013.
  82. ^"Letter from the Association of Canadian Archivists to the Director General of LAC"(PDF). ACA. May 31, 2012. Archived from the original(PDF) on May 14, 2013. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  83. ^"President's Letters about Library and Archives Canada". Bibliographical Society of Canada. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  84. ^Beale, Nigel (March 18, 2012). "Library and Archives, Canada's National disgrace (Part 1 of 3)". Literary Tourist. Retrieved April 22, 2013.
  85. ^Milligan, Ian (May 22, 2012). "The Smokescreen of 'Modernization' at Library and Archives Canada". ActiveHistory.ca. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  86. ^Knowles, Valerie (August 10, 2012). "Closing doors on Canada's history". iPolitics. Archived from the original on June 19, 2013. Retrieved April 22, 2013.
  87. ^"Joint Statement on Qualities of a Successful Librarian and Archivist of Canada"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on September 7, 2013. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  88. ^"Federal budget cuts to the Library & Archives of Canada stall Truth and Reconciliation Commission The Nation: Cree News". The Nation: Cree News. September 23, 2013. Retrieved March 1, 2018.
  89. ^Rennie, Steve (April 22, 2014). "Truth and Reconciliation Commission gets access to thousands more documents". The Toronto Star. ISSN 0319-0781. Retrieved March 1, 2018.
  90. ^"94 ways to redress the legacy of residential schools and advance reconciliation". CBC News. Retrieved March 1, 2018.
  91. ^"Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action"(PDF). 2015. Archived from the original(PDF) on June 15, 2015. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  92. ^"Archivists look to 'decolonize' Canada's memory banks". CTVNews. February 19, 2018. Retrieved March 1, 2018.
  93. ^"Indigitization Commentary on LAC Initiatives [Thread]". Twitter. February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  94. ^http://umanitoba.ca/nctr/
  95. ^Canada, Library and Archives. "Library and Archives Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Web Archive - Library and Archives Canada". Retrieved March 1, 2018.
  96. ^Heritage, Canadian (May 27, 2019). "Minister Rodriguez Announces Appointment to Library and Archives Canada". gcnws. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  97. ^ ab"Librarian and Archivist of Canada". Library and Archives Canada. January 7, 2014. Retrieved April 12, 2021.
  98. ^ abChabot, Victorin. "Jean-Pierre Wallot, The Historian Archivist, 1985-1997". LAC. Retrieved May 29, 2013.
  99. ^"Guy Berthiaume appointed as Librarian and Archivist of Canada" (Press release). Government of Canada. April 14, 2014. Retrieved April 16, 2014.
  100. ^"Biography of Dr. Daniel J. Caron". LAC. Archived from the original on May 11, 2017. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  101. ^"Mr. Wilson's Biography". LAC. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  102. ^ ab"Fellows of ICA: Ian E. Wilson". International Council on Archives. Archived from the original on June 8, 2013. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  103. ^ abGagnaire, Catherine (July 5, 1999). "Appointments to the Positions of National Archivist and of National Librarian" (Press release). Office of the Minister of Canadian Heritage.
  104. ^"Guy Sylvestre fonds". LAC. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  105. ^"W. Kaye Lamb fonds [multiple media]". LAC. Archived from the original on June 28, 2013. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  106. ^Wilson, Ian E. (2005). "'The Gift of One Generation to Another': The Real Thing for the Pepsi Generation". In Blouin, Francis X.; Rosenberg, William G. (eds.). Archives, documentation, and institutions of social memory : essays from the Sawyer Seminar (1st pbk. ed.). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. p. 341. ISBN .
  107. ^ abLaplante, Normand. "Before Mr. Lamb and Mr. Smith went to Ottawa". LAC. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  108. ^"Wilfred I. Smith fonds [multiple media]". LAC. Archived from the original on June 28, 2013. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  109. ^Bélanger, Claude. "Quebec History – Gustave Lanctot (1883-1975)". Marianopolis College. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  110. ^Wilson, Ian E. (January 1982). ""A Noble Dream": The Origins of the Public Archives of Canada". Archivaria: 16–35. Retrieved October 18, 2020.
  111. ^ ab"Sir Arthur George Doughty (1860-1936)". LAC. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  112. ^"Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online – Brymner, Douglas". University of Toronto. Retrieved May 30, 2013.

Further reading[edit]

  • Council of Federal Libraries (Canada): Readers' Services Committee. Basic Readers' Services = Principaux services offerts aux lecteurs. Ottawa, Ont.: National Library of Canada, cop. 1980, t.p. 1979. N.B.: The English and French texts are printed tête-bêche one to the other. ISBN 0-662-50668-5
  • Delvaux, Alex, and Yves Marcoux. Public Archives Library = Bibliothèque des Archives publiques. In "General Guide Series: 1983". [Ottawa]: Public Archives Canada, 1983. Text, printed tête-bêche, in English and in French. ISBN 0-662-52580-9
  • Kallmann, Helmut. "The Music Division of the National Library: the First Five Years", The Canada Music Book, vol. 10, [no. 1] (Spring/Summer 1975), p. 95-100. N.B.: Also printed as a fold. offprint.
  • Library and Archives Canada. Legal Deposit at the [then named] National Library of Canada = Le Dépôt légal à la Bibliothèque nationale du Canada. Ottawa: National Library of Canada, 1982. N.B.: Text, printed tête-bêche, in English and in French. ISBN 0-662-52131-5
  • Library and Archives Canada. Music Collection [of the] National Library of Canada['s] Music Division = Collection de musique [de la] Division de la musique, Bibliothèque nationale du Canada. Ottawa: National Library of Canada, 1989. N.B.: Texts in English and in French, printed tête-bêche. ISBN 0-662-57231-9
  • Library and Archives Canada. National Film, Television, and Sound Archives = Archives nationales du film, de la television et de l'enregistrement sonore, in General Guide Series. Ottawa: Public Archives Canada, 1983. 45 p. (English) + 47 p. (French), ill. with b&w photos. N.B.: The English and French texts are printed tête-bêche one to the other. ISBN 0-662-52650-3
  • Library and Archives Canada: Sound Archives Section. Sound Archives, Guide to Procedures = Les Archives sonores, guide méthodologique. 3rd ed. ... rev. ... and updated, [in] collaboration between ... Michel Bourbonnais et al.; Josephine Langham ... responsible for the revision of the text in the English-language version. Ottawa: Public Archives Canada, 1979. N.B.: Texts in English and in French, printed tête-bêche one to the other. ISBN 0-662-50363-5

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°25′11″N75°42′28.5″W / 45.41972°N 75.707917°W / 45.41972; -75.707917

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You can watch a thematic video

What is a Photo Archive?
var mapElement = document.getElementById('map'); // Create the Google Map using out element and options defined above What’s New In? Archives var map = new google.maps.Map(mapElement, mapOptions); // move map when needed // $('select#liblocation').live('change', function(e) { $('select#liblocation').change(function(e) { $('.lib-branch.active').hide().removeClass('active'); $('#lib-'+ e.val).fadeIn().addClass('active'); switch (e.val) { What’s New In? Archives case 'specialcol': moveToLocation(36.1072,-115.142325); $('div#lib-'+ e.val +'-hours').fadeIn().addClass('active'); $('div.hours').fadeIn(); break; case 'lied': moveToLocation(36.1072,-115.142325); $('div#lib-'+ e.val +'-hours').fadeIn().addClass('active'); $('div.hours').fadeIn(); break; What’s New In? Archives case 'arch': moveToLocation(36.102571,-115.138773); What’s New In? Archives $('div#lib-'+ e.val +'-hours').fadeIn().addClass('active'); What’s New In? Archives $('div.hours').fadeIn(); break; case 'curr': moveToLocation(36.109294,-115.140635); $('div#lib-'+ e.val +'-hours').fadeIn().addClass('active'); $('div.hours').fadeIn(); break; case 'music': moveToLocation(36.110596,-115.138191); $('div#lib-'+ e.val +'-hours').fadeIn().addClass('active'); $('div.hours').fadeIn(); break; case 'law': moveToLocation(36.107952,-115.139975); // What’s New In? Archives hours altogether $('div.hours').fadeOut(); break; } }); // funtion that moves the map function moveToLocation(lat, lng) { var center = new google.maps.LatLng(lat, lng); // using global variable: map.panTo(center); } }
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In homes, schools and libraries across Canada, people are looking for evidence of what it means to be a Canadian. ARCHIVESCANADA.ca is a gateway to archival resources found in over 800 repositories across Canada--it's your gateway to Canada's collective memory!

 

Through ARCHIVESCANADA.ca you can:

  • Search archival holdings across Canada
  • Access Provincial and Territorial Archival Networks
  • View digitized photographs, maps and other documents about Canada's history

*New* archival descriptions and digitized products are added regularly.

 

ARCHIVESCANADA.ca is an official archival portal maintained by the  Canadian Council of Archives (CCA), and is a joint initiative of CCA, the Provincial and Territorial Archival Networks, and Library and Archives Canada (LAC). All archival descriptions and links contained in the searchable database are provided by provincial and territorial councils, their members, and LAC.

We welcome your feedback.

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What Are Archives?

What Are Archives?

The word archives can be used in three different ways:

  • The word archives (usually written with a lower case a and sometimes referred to in the singular, as archive) refers to the permanently valuable records—such as letters, reports, accounts, minute books, draft and final manuscripts, and photographs—of people, businesses, and government. These records are kept because they have continuing value to the creating agency and to other potential users. They are the documentary evidence of past events. They are the facts we use to interpret and understand history.
  • An Archives (often written with a capital A and usually, but not always, in the plural) is an organization dedicated to preserving the documentary heritage of a particular group: a city, a province or state, a business, a university, or a community. For example, the National Archives and Records Administration in the United States, Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan, The Coca-Cola Company Archives, and The Archives of the Episcopal Church are all responsible for the preservation and management of archives.
  • The word archives is also used to refer to the building or part of a building in which archival materials are kept, i.e., the archival repository itself.

Excerpted from The Story Behind the Book: Preserving Authors’ and Publishers’ Archives by Laura Millar

What’s an Archivist?

In the course of everyday life, individuals, organizations, and governments create and keep information about their activities. These records may be personal and unplanned—a photograph, a letter to a friend, notes toward a manuscript—or they may be official and widely shared—financial and legal documents, recordings of public speeches, medical files, and electronic records. These records, and the places in which they are kept, are called archives, and archivists are the professionals who assess, collect, organize, preserve, and provide access to these records.

The Work of Archivists

Archivists hold professional positions requiring adherence to national and international standards of practice and conduct in accordance with a professional code of ethics. The majority of professional archivists hold a baccalaureate degree, and many have one or more advanced degrees related to the profession.

Assess: Not every record has enduring value, and archivists don’t keep every record that comes their way. Instead, archivists select records, a process that requires an understanding of the historical context in which the records were created, the uses for which they were intended, and their relationships to other sources.

Collect and Organize: Archivists arrange and describe the collection of records, in accordance with national and international standards of practice.

Preserve: Because materials in archival collections are unique, What’s New In? Archives, specialized, or rare, archivists strive to protect records from physical damage and theft so that they can be used today and in the future. Increasingly archivists play a key role in ensuring that digital records, which may quickly grow obsolete, will be available when needed in the future.

Provide Access: Archivists identify the essential evidence of our society and ensure its availability for use by students, teachers, researchers, organization leaders, historians, and a wide range of individuals with information needs. Many archivists also plan and direct exhibitions, publications, and other outreach programs to broaden the use of collections, helping people find and understand the information they need.

Archivists and Other Professions

Archivists are sometimes confused with other closely related professionals, such as librarians, records managers, curators, and historians. This is not surprising, as many archivists share a location, materials, or goals with these professions. Although some work is related, distinct differences exist in the work of the archivist.  
Librarians and Archivists: Both professionals collect, preserve, and make accessible materials for research, but they differ significantly in the way they arrange, describe, and use the materials in their collections. Materials in archival collections are unique and often irreplaceable, whereas libraries can usually obtain new copies of worn-out or lost books.

Records Managers and Archivists: The records manager controls vast quantities of institutional records, most of which are needed in the short term and will eventually be destroyed. The archivist is concerned with relatively small quantities of records deemed important enough to be retained for an extended period.

Museum Curators and Archivists: Although their materials sometimes overlap, the museum curator collects, studies, and interprets mostly three-dimensional objects, while the archivist works primarily with paper, film, audio, and electronic records. Selections from an archives may be exhibited in a museum.

Historians and Archivists: These two professions have a longstanding partnership. The archivist identifies, preserves, and makes records accessible for use; the historian uses archival records for research.

Archivists in the World

Archival records serve to strengthen collective memory and protect people’s rights, property, What’s New In? Archives, and identity. For example, historians and genealogists rely on archival sources to analyze past events and reconstruct family histories; businesses use the records to improve their public relations and promote new products; medical researchers utilize records to study patterns of diseases; Native Americans may use archival records to establish legal claims to land and privileges guaranteed by federal and state governments; and authors use archives to acquire a feel for the people and times about which they are writing. In short, archives benefit What’s New In? Archives everyone—even those who have not used them directly.

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Library and Archives Canada

National library and archive of Canada

Library and Archives Canada.JPG

Library and Archives Canada building in Ottawa

TypeNational library and
national archives
Established2004
Location395 Wellington St, What’s New In? Archives, ON, K1A 0N4
Items collectedAboriginal What’s New In? Archives albums and scrapbooks; architectural drawings; art; artifacts; Canadian children's literature; Canadian comic books; Canadian newspapers; Canadian periodicals; electronic publications; electronic records; English-language pulp literature; ethnic community newsletters; ephemera; fiction and non-fiction; films; globes; government publications; government records; government websites; Hebraica and Judaica; Indian residential school records; journals and diaries; livres d’artistes; manuscripts; maps; microfilms; photographs; poetry; portraits; rare books; sheet music; sketchbooks; sound recordings; stamps; textual archives; theses and dissertations; trade catalogues; videos[1]
Size22 million books and publications (periodicals, newspapers, microfilms, literary texts, and government Borland c++ builder 6 Enterprise crack serial keygen 250 km of government and private textual records; 3 million architectural drawings, maps, and plans; 30 million photos; 350,000 hours of film; 425,000 works of art (including paintings, drawings, watercolours, posters, prints, medals, and caricatures); 547,000 musical items; over 1 billion MB of digital content[2][3]
Criteria for collectionCanadiana, documents published in Canada and materials published elsewhere of interest to Wps 2000 records documenting the What’s New In? Archives and activities of the Government of Canada; records of heritage value that document the historical development and diversity of Canadian society[5]
Legal depositYes[4]
BudgetCDN$98,346,695 (2013–14)[6][7]
DirectorLeslie Weir[8]
Staff860 FTE (2013–14)[7]
Minister responsible
Parent agencyCanadian Heritage
Key document
Websitewww.bac-lac.gc.ca

Library and Archives Canada (LAC; French: Bibliothèque et Archives Canada) is a federal institution What’s New In? Archives with acquiring, preserving, and providing accessibility to the documentary heritage of Canada.[9] It is the fifth largest library in the world.

LAC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage, whose incumbent has been Steven Guilbeault since November 20, 2019. Genealogists account for 70% of LAC's clients.[11]

History and mandate[edit]

The Dominion Archives was founded in 1872 as a division within the Department of Agriculture tasked with acquiring and transcribing documents related to Canadian history. In 1912, the division was transformed into an autonomous organization, What’s New In? Archives, Public Archives of Canada, with the new responsibility of managing government documents on all types of media.[12] The organization would be renamed in 1987 as the National Archives of Canada.[12]

With the efforts of people like Freda Farrell Waldon, the first president of the Canadian Library Association,[13][14] the National Library of Canada was founded in 1953.[12]

In 2004, What’s New In? Archives, under the initiative of former National Librarian Roch Carrier and National Archivist Ian E. Wilson, the functions of the National Archives of Canada and the National Library of Canada were combined to form the Library and Archives Canada (LAC).[12][15][16][17] The LAC was established per the Library and Archives of Canada Act (Bill C-8), proclaimed on April 22, 2004, with a subsequent Order-in-Council on May 21 which formally united the collections, services, and personnel of the National Archives of Canada and the National Library of Canada.[18] Wilson assumed the position as the first Librarian and Archivist of Canada in July that year.

Since its inception, LAC has reported to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.[19] LAC's stated mandate is:[9][8][20]

  • to preserve the documentary heritage of Canada for the benefit of present and future generations;
  • to be a source of enduring knowledge accessible to all, contributing to the cultural, social and economic advancement of Canada as a free and democratic society;
  • to facilitate in Canada co-operation among communities involved in the acquisition, preservation and diffusion of knowledge;
  • to serve as the continuing memory of the Government of Canada and its institutions.

LAC is expected to maintain "effective recordkeeping practices that ensure transparency and accountability".[21]

Collection[edit]

LAC's holdings include:[2]

  • 250 linear kilometres of Canadian Government and representative private textual records
    • textual archives for various individuals and groups who have contributed to the cultural, social, economic and political development of Canada
  • 22 million books and macOS Archives - Ocean Cracked acquired largely through legal deposit
  • 24 million photographic images (including prints, negatives, slides, and digital photos)
  • over 3 million architectural drawings, What’s New In? Archives, plans, and maps
  • over 90,000 films (including short and full-length films, documentaries, and silent films)
  • over 550,000 hours of audio and video recordings
  • over 425,000 works of art (including watercolours, oil paintings, sketches, caricatures and miniatures, as well as medals, seals, posters and coats of arms)
  • about 550,000 musical items (including the largest collection of Canadian sheet music in the world; documentation related to music in Canada; and recordings on disks and records of all formats, including piano rolls, reels What’s New In? Archives spools, and 8-track tapes)
  • the Canadian Postal Archives;
  • national newspapers from across Canada, What’s New In? Archives, including daily newspapers, student newspapers, Indigenous magazines, and ethnic community newsletters.

Notable items in the collection include:[22]

Digitization[edit]

The LAC also houses more than a petabyte of digital content.[2][30] Some of this content is available online, primarily books, Canadian What’s New In? Archives, and census material—equating to around 5 thousand terabytes of information in electronic format.[31][32] Many items have not been digitized and are only available in physical form.[33] As of May 2013, only about 1% of the collection had been digitized, representing "about 25 million of the more popular and most fragile items."[34][35][36]

Facilities[edit]

Preservation Centre,
625 du Carrefour Boulevard, Gatineau

The building at 395 Wellington Street in downtown Ottawa is the main physical location where the public may access the collection in person. The building was officially opened on June 20, 1967.[33][37] With the de-emphasis on physical visits, in-person services have been curtailed—for example, since What’s New In? Archives 2012, reference services are by appointment only—and the role of this building is decreasing.[38][39][40] There are also administrative offices in Gatineau, Quebec, and preservation and storage facilities throughout Canada for federal government records.[33][22][41][42]

The Preservation Centre in the city centre of Gatineau, about 10 kilometres away from the Ottawa headquarters, was designed to provide a safe environment for the long-term storage Macdrive 10.5.4 Pro Torrent Archives preservation of Canada's valuable collections. It was built at a cost of CDN$107 million, and the official opening took place on June 4, 1997. It is a unique building containing 48 climate-controlled preservation vaults and state-of-the-art preservation laboratories.[41][43][44][45] In 2000, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada named it one of the top 500 buildings constructed in Canada during the last millennium.[46]

A Nitrate Film Preservation Facility on the Communications Research Centre campus in Shirleys Bay, on the outskirts of Ottawa, houses Canada's cellulose nitrate film collection.[47] The collection contains 5,575 film reels dating back to 1912, including some of the first Canadian motion pictures and photographic negatives.[22][48] The film material is highly sensitive and requires precise temperatures for its preservation. The state-of-the-art facility, which was officially opened on June 21, 2011,[49] is an eco-designed building featuring an environmentally friendly roof that provides better insulation and minimizes energy expenditures.[50]

A planned key activity for 2013–14 was to rehouse analogue (non-digital) information resources in a new state-of-the-art high-density storage facility in Gatineau, where the national newspaper collection and records of Second World War veterans will be stored.[7][51] The facility will feature a high bay metal shelving system with a suitable environment to better protect Canada's published heritage.[52][53][54] In January 2019, Library and Archives Canada announced that negotiations for a new facility to be built next to the existing one in Gatineau were starting, with an opening date in 2022.[55]

LAC's online collection is accessible via its website and LAC provides ongoing information online via its blog, podcasts, the Twitter and Facebooksocial networking services, the Flickrimage-sharing site, and the YouTubevideo-sharing site. RSS feeds provide links to new content on the LAC website and news about LAC services and resources.[31][56][57] A new modernized website is being developed and is scheduled for completion in 2013, with both new and old websites accessible during the transition period.[58]

Modernization and budget cuts[edit]

In June 2004, LAC issued a discussion paper titled Creating a New Kind of Knowledge Institution;[59] after consultation in June 2006, it issued LAC Directions for Change, a document setting out five key directions to define the new institution:[60]

  • A new kind of knowledge institution
  • A truly national institution
  • Working with others to strengthen the whole of Canada's documentary heritage
  • A prime learning destination
  • A lead institution in government information management.

LAC's What’s New In? Archives policy provides for transformation from wilcom embroidery studio e4 institution focused on the acquisition and preservation of analogue (non-digital) materials to one that excels in digital access and digital preservation.[61] A Documentary Heritage Management Framework developed in 2009 seeks the right balance between resources dedicated to analogue and digital materials and is based on:

  • three main business pillars: acquisition, preservation and resource discovery (resource discovery includes description, discovery, access and services to the public)
  • four guiding principles for fulfilling its documentary heritage mandate, i.e. significance, sufficiency, sustainability and society (broad social context)
  • four key roles, i.e. foundation building (relationship building), collaboration, program (integrated collection management processes) and transfer (formal agreements with third parties to fulfill its legislated mandate).

Eight pilot research projects were initiated to validate the framework, What’s New In? Archives, including projects What’s New In? Archives military documentary heritage, aboriginal documentary heritage, and stewardship of newspapers in a digital age.[62][63][64] In March 2010 LAC issued its final report on Canadian Digital Information Strategy stakeholder consultations initiated in accordance with its mandate to facilitate co-operation among Canadian knowledge communities.[65] In the same month it issued Shaping Our Continuing Memory Collectively: A Representative Documentary CCleaner Professional 5.82.8950 + Key (Latest Version) 2021 Free Download, a document which outlines how it plans to achieve its modernization objectives.[66]

Despite LAC's stated objectives of continuing to fulfill its mandate by adapting to changes in the information environment and collaboration with others, the actual experience since 2004 has been a reduction in both services and collaboration.[61][62][67] Federal funding cuts since 2004 have also impacted on LAC services and acquisitions.[35][36][67][68][69] A detailed timeline of relevant developments and the decline in LAC services since 2004 has been compiled by the Ex Libris Association.[70]

Impact on employees[edit]

Following the announcement in the 2012 federal budget of a CDN$9.6 million funding cut over the three years commencing in 2012–13,[71] more than 400 LAC employees received notices which indicated their jobs may be affected and the department announced a 20% reduction of its workforce of about 1,100 over the following three years.[40][72][73][74] The "harsh" wording of a 23-page code of conduct for employees effective January 2013, which "spells out values, potential conflicts of interest and expected What’s New In? Archives, has been criticized by the Association of Canadian Archivists and the Canadian Association of MiniTool Power Data Recovery 10 Crack + Keygen Free Download Teachers among others, What’s New In? Archives. The code describes personal activities including teaching and speaking at or attending conferences as "high risk" activities "with regard to conflict of interest, conflict of duties and duty of loyalty" and participation in such activities is subject to strict conditions. In a section on duty of loyalty, What’s New In? Archives, it also cautions employees about expressing personal opinions in social media What’s New In? Archives. Only authorized LAC spokespersons may issue statements or make public comments about LAC's mandate and activities, which includes controversial changes related to modernization and budget cuts.[75][76][77][78]

Public criticism[edit]

Changes introduced under the management of Ian E. Wilson and Daniel J. Caron have been the subject of controversy and public criticism.[67][79] Caron asserted that radical change is needed to cope with the influx and demand for digital material and they are subject to federal budget constraints.[78][80]

Following Caron's resignation in May 2013, a stakeholder coalition issued a joint statement on the qualities of a successful Librarian and Archivist of Canada for official consideration in what they consider a "matter of great national significance":[79][87]

A broad coalition of What’s New In? Archives stakeholder organizations has developed the following list of qualities we believe the Librarian and Archivist of Canada should have in order to be successful in this critical position of public trust and responsibility. We believe it is essential that the Adobe Premiere Pro Crack 2021 v15.4.1.6 + License Key [Latest] appointed to this position at this time possess the necessary qualities to meet the tremendous challenges of dealing with the What’s New In? Archives issues of the digital environment in an era of limited financial and human resources and the demands of providing increased public access to the irreplaceable treasures of Canadian documentary heritage.

In June 2013 the Heritage Minister said speeding up the digitization of records will be a priority for the new Librarian and Archivist of Canada. Moore also said he will ask the person appointed to revisit the termination of the National Archival Development Program.[68][69]

Truth and Reconciliation Commission[edit]

During the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Library and Archives Canada initially failed to produce records requested by the commission in a timely and comprehensive manner and was ordered by an Ontario Superior Court judge to do so.[88] Ultimately, LAC did provide the records, but many were not in digitized and searchable formats as required by What’s New In? Archives commission.[89]

The Calls to Action of the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission explicitly referenced Library and Archives Canada as follows:

We call upon Library and Archives Canada to: fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations Joinet-Orentlicher principles, as related to Aboriginal peoples' inalienable right to know the truth about what happened and why, with regard to human rights violations committed against them in the What’s New In? Archives schools; ensure that its record holding related to residential schools What’s New In? Archives accessible to What’s New In? Archives public; [and] commit more resources to its public education materials and programming on residential schools.[90][91]

Library and Archives Canada has begun to address these concerns by dedicating funding to hire Indigenous archivists, build relationships with Indigenous communities, and support digitization efforts.[92] However, Indigenous-led organizations have drawn attention to the fact that Indigenous communities have been conducting this type of work for decades.[93]

LAC also holds and provides access What’s New In? Archives archival copies of the websites of organizations related to the TRC, in collaboration with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation,[94] the University of Winnipeg Library, and University of Manitoba Libraries.[95]

Librarians and Archivists[edit]

The Librarian and Archivist of Canada has the same seniority level as a deputy minister of a federal department.[8]

On May 27, 2019, Leslie Weir was appointed Librarian and Archivist of Canada for a four-year term commencing August 30, 2019.[96] Weir is the first woman to hold What’s New In? Archives role.[97]

The head of Canada's national archives was known as the Dominion Archivist from 1872 to 1987 and the National Archivist from 1987 to 2004.[98]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Further reading[edit]

  • Council of Federal Libraries (Canada): Readers' Services Committee. Basic Readers' Services = Principaux services offerts aux lecteurs. Ottawa, Ont.: National Library of Canada, cop. 1980, t.p. 1979. N.B.: The English and French texts are printed tête-bêche one to the other. ISBN 0-662-50668-5
  • Delvaux, Alex, and Yves Marcoux. Public Archives Library = Bibliothèque des Archives publiques. In "General Guide Series: 1983". [Ottawa]: Public Archives Canada, 1983. Text, printed tête-bêche, in English and in French. ISBN 0-662-52580-9
  • Kallmann, Helmut. "The Music Division of the National Library: the First Five Years", The Canada Music Book, vol. 10, [no. 1] (Spring/Summer 1975), p. 95-100. N.B.: Also printed as a fold. offprint.
  • Library and Archives Canada. Legal Deposit at the [then named] National Library of Canada = Le Dépôt légal à la Bibliothèque nationale du Canada. Ottawa: National Library of Canada, 1982. What’s New In? Archives Text, printed tête-bêche, in English and in French. ISBN 0-662-52131-5
  • Library and Archives Canada. Music Collection [of the] National Library of Canada['s] Music Division = Collection de musique [de la] Division de la musique, Bibliothèque nationale du Canada. Ottawa: National Library of Canada, 1989. N.B.: Texts in English and in French, printed tête-bêche. ISBN 0-662-57231-9
  • Library and Archives Canada. National Film, Television, and Sound Archives = Archives nationales du film, de la television et de l'enregistrement sonore, in General Guide Series. Ottawa: Public Archives Canada, 1983. 45 p. (English) + 47 p. (French), ill. with b&w photos. N.B.: The English and French texts are printed tête-bêche one to the other, What’s New In? Archives. ISBN 0-662-52650-3
  • Library and Archives Canada: Sound Archives Section. Sound Archives, Guide to Procedures = Les Archives sonores, guide méthodologique. 3rd ed. ., What’s New In? Archives. rev. . and updated, [in] collaboration between . Michel Bourbonnais et al.; Josephine Langham . responsible for the revision of the text in the English-language version. Ottawa: Public Archives Canada, 1979. N.B.: Texts in English and in French, printed tête-bêche one to the other, What’s New In? Archives. ISBN 0-662-50363-5

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°25′11″N75°42′28.5″W / 45.41972°N 75.707917°W / 45.41972; -75.707917

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
What’s New In? Archives

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