Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version

  • 05.06.2019
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Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version

The beauty of the index is that it allows Windows 10 to find files much more you want to see all files based on authorship, date created, tags, subject. Inside every music file lives a small form called a tag that contains the filling out their songs' tags, but other people update them meticulously. Here is how you can add tags in Windows 10 files and folders and use go to the “File” menu and click “Save” for a new document or “Save. Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version

Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version - abstract

Tagging Files With Windows 10

This quite lengthy article explains and discusses the built-in file tagging implementation of Microsoft Windows 10. I do have a strong background with PIM and tagging and this article is written from the human perspective when manually tagging user-generated files.

To my knowledge, Microsoft is currently not actively promoting this feature. Therefore, complaining on bad design decisions does not apply here as long as Microsoft does not understand this kind of tagging as something which was designed to be used by the general user. Because from my perspective, it obviously can't be meant to be used in practice. Unfortunately. Let's take a closer look why I came to this conclusion.

TL;DR: Microsoft Windows does provide NTFS features to tag arbitrary files. Some applications do also merge format-specific tags with these NTFS tags. Although there are quite nice retrieval functions for tags, it is very complicated to use this for general file management. Applied tags are easily lost so that in practice, users will refrain from using native Windows file tagging like this.

Table of contents:

  1. What Does Tagging Mean Here?
  2. A Well-Hidden Feature
  3. How to See and Assign Tags
  4. How to Make Use of Tags
  5. Playing Around With Tags
  6. Enabled File Types for Tagging
  7. How to Enable Tags for More File Types
  8. Relations Between Applications and Meta-Data
  9. History, Implementation Details, and Similar Implementations
  10. Windows 10 Tags Considered as Fragile
  11. Summary and Remarks

What Does Tagging Mean Here?

For this article, I am talking about non-collaborative local file-tagging. This describes the process of attaching one or more unique keywords to files stored on NTFS file systems by users who are able to access the file with granted write-permissions via the Windows File Explorer. "Keywords" and "tags" are used as synonyms here.

I could elaborate on tag and tag-system definitions for quite some time but let us stop here for the sake of brevity. It will be a long journey after all.

A Well-Hidden Feature

By default, the Windows UI does not expose anything at all that would help the users to recognize the file tagging possibility. So we do have a more or less full support for tagging files and yet Microsoft hides this quite well from the common eye. Probably for a good reason, which we are going to find out below.

Although I'm very interested in topics related to tagging this feature is that well hidden so that I was not aware of this feature myself until I read about it in a book in 2018. Support for tagging started as early as with Windows Vista.

How to See and Assign Tags

In order to see and edit file tags, you have to enable "View (Tab) → Details pane" in the File Explorer.

There is a second UI feature you might want to activate: the read-only Tags column is activated by choosing "Tags" in the context menu of the column bar:

When you go through different files, you will recognize that not all file types can be tagged by default. For example, the details pane for a simple text file does not show the "Tags: Add a tag" in contrast to any JPEG image file as shown in the screen-shots above.

Assigned tags are visible in the details pane as well as in the tags column:

Adding or modifying tags is possible in the Details pane but not in the tags column. You will recognize that Microsoft allows tags with spaces and special characters. Multiple tags are usually separated by semicolons which is probably the only standard character which is not allowed within tags.

The last place where File Explorer is showing you the assigned tags and also allows to edit them is within the Properties of a file:

As shown in the screenshots above, tags might be added/removed/modified at two places: either on the "Details pane" (on the right hand side of the File Explorer window) or within the file properties on its "Details" tab.

How to Make Use of Tags

Now that we have tagged some files, what possibilities are there to use this meta-data in daily life? First of all, there is navigation. For navigating through your files, you might prefer your File Explorer sorted alphabetically by file name:

With tags, you might also sort alphabetically by tags instead:

Since the order of files in the "sorted by tags"-view is depending on the order of tags within the files, I do not consider this a great improvement. However, what is really neat is when you consider the "Group by"-method. Be default, File Explorer is grouping by names:

You can change the grouping in the "View" tab of the File Explorer:

Having switched to "Group by Tags", you will notice that all files are arranged by their assigned tags:

Untagged files are listed in the "Unspecified" category at the bottom. The categories above correspond to the alphabetically sorted list of tags. Each file is listed once for each tag. So if a file like does have two different tags ("Dogs" and "House"), it is listed twice. One time in the category "Dogs" and one time in the category "House". If you select it in one category, this single file gets selected in all categories.

Complementary to file navigation, File Explorer has a search feature implemented. The following image shows the result when you do search for a tag "house" within the folder we've used above:

You will notice that all files are listed in the results that do feature the tag "house" or "House". So search as well as "Group by Tags" is case insensitive when it comes to tags. All other files, not having the "house" tag, are omitted.

When you search for multiple tags, just the files that do contain all of them are listed:

On the negative side, you can not search for keywords that only occur within tags. I would have expected a query language according to the widespread pattern like "tag:dog" which would look for the occurrence of "dog" but only within the tags and not the file name or the content.

So if you're searching for "dog", you will find files that contain the tag dog as well as files that do contain "dog" within their file name:

This File Explorer tag search is not a sub-string search: if you want to find files tagged with "mydog", you can not find them by searching for "dog". However, when you have tagged files with "my dog", you will find them in the search results for "dog" but not within search results for "dogs".

In summary: Searching for tags is:

  • case-insensitive,
  • non-sub-string,
  • whole-word and not whole-tag.

Playing Around With Tags

When you play around with different tags, you will find out that this feature is intended to be used case-insensitive. When you tag a file with "Dog" and "dog", the last one wins and the other gets removed.

When "Arrange by Tags" is used, the tag "Dog" as well as "dog" gets listed in the category "Dog".

When you select multiple tagged files, the Details pane shows only the tags that can be found within all selected files. The other ones are not visualized. You may add additional tags which then gets added to all selected files:

You may remove all tags of one or a set of selected files with "Properties → Details → Remove ...".

This page mentions a context menu function to export the meta-data of selected files to an file. Meta-data from an file could be applied to the files as well. I was not able to find this function in my tests.

Enabled File Types for Tagging

In the previous sections I mentioned briefly that only a sub-set of file types may be tagged by default. In my opinion, this is a very tough restriction if you want to use tags for organizing your files.

On a fresh Windows 10 installation, there are not even a hundred file types that may be tagged. When apps get installed like Microsoft Office or LibreOffice, meta-data handlers for additional file formats gets added and configured. On my business Windows 10 system approximately 180 extensions had associated meta-data handlers. After installing LibreOffice on a Windows 10 virtual machine, about 120 extensions were listed as tag-able, approximately thirty of them from LibreOffice alone. I noticed that LibreOffice does not create meta-data handlers for Microsoft formats such as or whereas handler for older formats are created: or .

It is important to know that not all meta-data handlers offer meta-data tagging by keywords. Only meta-data handlers that contain definitions for "System.Keywords" result in the ability to be tagged. Furthermore, not all meta-data handlers that contains keywords/tags offer them also in file properties.

I tried to come up with a minimum list of activated tagging via meta-data handlers. When downloading a fresh Windows 10 virtual machine like that one, you will find some tools pre-installed. In this case, these are many development tools. After manually installing DotNet, LibreOffice 5.4.4, paint.net 4.2.5, all extensions with enabled handlers for keywords/tags are:

.asf .cr2 .crw .dng .doc .dot .dvr-ms .erf .flac .jfif .jpe .jpeg .jpg .jxr .kdc .m1v .m2t .m2ts .m2v .m4a .m4b .m4p .m4v .mka .mkv .mod .mov .mp2 .mp2v .mp4 .mp4v .mp3 .mpeg .mpg .mpv2 .mrw .msi .msp .mts .nef .nrw .pef .raf .raw .rw2 .rwl .sr2 .srw .tif .tiff .tod .ts .tts .uvu .vob .wdp .weba .webm .wma .wmv

I did not mention all well-known LibreOffice formats that were also in the list.

As you can see, most of these activated file types do not reflect bug relevance for the average user. Selected extensions that do not have handlers or no handlers that provide tagging:

.avi .docx .exe .gif .lnk .mp3 .png .wav .css .csv .epub .gz .html .json .java .txt .wmf .xhtml .xlsx .zip

Therefore, there are many file types which may be used on any given Windows machine that can not be tagged by default.

How to Enable Tags for More File Types

After we have found out that it would be nice to have more file formats enabled for tagging, how are we able to enable meta-data handlers ourselves?

The answer lies within a project called FileMeta. You can download the latest release on their release page. Installing this tool requires administration permissions. I totally recommend the documentation pages for learning about details on this topic in general.

After installing FileMeta, you will find multiple executables in its install directory: , and .

Most things can also be done on the command line. For configuring the tagging functionality, we'll stick to the graphical for this article. After starting up the File Meta Association Manager you will see three main parts of the UI:

  1. Some workflows for manipulating on the left hand side,
  2. the File Extensions list with the handler associations and
  3. the meta-data related settings on the right hand side:

Extending the List of File Extensions

The list of the file extensions are read from the Windows registry. If you can not find a specific file extension in the File Meta Association Manager, no application has registered the file extension so far. If you do associate a file extension with an application ("Always open with ..."), this does not create a registry entry. Therefore, associating an extension with an application is not sufficient that this extension gets listed in the File Meta Association Manager.

To add an extension not listed yet, you have to start the registry editor with administrator privileges, go to "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE" → "SOFTWARE" → "Classes" and choose "New → Key" from the context menu.

Then you can enter your new extension like, e.g., and confirm with the return key. After restarting the File Meta Association Manager you'll find the new extension in the list.

Pre-Defined Profiles

My File Meta Association Manager lists two pre-defined profiles: "Simple" and "OfficeDSOfile". The latter seems to be set up by LibreOffice. The "Simple" profile has a few properties set up for "Preview Panel", "Details tab in Properties" and "Info Tip":

Custom Profiles

If you would like to set up a new custom profile, you have to know:

  • Full details → Description "System.Keywords": necessary to see and edit tags in the preferences → Details tab.
  • The Preview Panel → "System.Keywords": necessary to see and edit tags in the Details pane.

You can't have Details pane without preferences Details tab. Both settings enable the tags shown in the column bar.

Therefore, a minimal custom profile for tagging where you can see the tags in the Details tab looks like that:

Such a profile results in a File Explorer view like that, where you can edit tags in the preferences as well as in the Details tab:

Whenever you change meta-data handlers, you will probably going to restart the File Explorer via the "Restart Explorer" button of the File Meta Association Manager in order to apply changes.

After setting up a custom meta-data handler for file extensions, you can see them also in the command line tool :

c:\Program Files\File Metadata>FileMetaAssoc.exe -l .txt Simple File Meta Property Handler c:\Program Files\File Metadata>

Relations Between Applications and Meta-Data

As mentioned briefly before, some applications do create meta-data handlers for file extensions when being installed. For example, LibreOffice is creating handlers for their document formats as well as some formats from Microsoft such as or but not or .

Programs like LibreOffice Writer or Microsoft Word do provide meta-data within the preferences of an open document.

You are able to enter tags within the document properties:

These tags can now be seen in the file properties (Details tab) as well as in the tags column. Because of the missing "System.Keywords" in the profile for the "Preview Panel", the tags are not shown in the Details tab of the File Explorer:

Here is the File Meta Association Manager profile "LibreOffice property handler" as set up by LibreOffice:

It's interesting to see that the "LibreOffice property handler" is not visible in the File Meta Association Manager profiles. So I tried to overwrite the "LibreOffice property handler" with the "Simple" profile. To my surprise, this happened:

Yes, this makes sense after all. After confirming this dialogue, the File Meta Association Manager window was gone. I thought that this action was not successful and the app crashed. After restarting the application, I noticed the successfully merged profiles for the extension.

Unfortunately, in contrast to my expectations, there was no change: no tags visible in Preview page of File Explorer and tags in Details tab can not be changed, only viewed. So this was not a success after all: I still can not modify tags for LibreOffice Writer files outside of LibreOffice Writer file preferences although they can be seen in File Explorer.

So I started to create some non-native LibreOffice Writer documents: and . For files, there were no document property tags visible in File Explorer: not in Preview pane, not in tags column and not in the file properties.

Different story with the files though: Here, the document property tags are synchronized with the NTFS meta-data. Whenever a tag is added or changed in the file properties, the same change appears in the LibreOffice Writer document properties and vice versa. However, there are no tags/keywords visible in the Preview pane.

This tag synchronization mechanism has a minor issue: when you do not create a file from within LibreOffice Writer or Microsoft Word but with a text editor, there is no within-file meta-data preferences yet. This results in an error message when you want to tag a zero byte file in File Explorer:

When you do select "New → Excel Spreadsheet" in File Explorer with Microsoft Office installed, it does not create a zero byte file as with Word files using the same method. Instead, it fills the spreadsheet file with a seven kilobyte default content. This way, you won't get this error message for Excel files in this situation.

Related to this, you can read on the FileMeta FAQ for PDF files:

If I add the File Meta Property Handler for PDF files, will I see properties already in those files? No, unless you are using version 1.4 and are extending an existing property handler for PDF files. File Meta has no capability otherwise for reading properties held within the PDF formatted part of the file. File Meta always writes properties in an NTFS-provided annex to the file. [...] The bad news is that File Meta before version 1.4 will not read properties held in the type-specific formatted part of a file, and no version of File Meta will update such properties.

To make this even more complicated, you have to know that Windows supports tags for every file type, internally. They will not be visible in the properties section of that file, but when you search for those tags, the file appears in search results.

After all these experiences I can only sum up my experience with: it's very complicated. The end-user can not expect tags/keywords to be visible in the File Explorer. She is not able to know if document preference keywords are synchronized to the NTFS meta-data. If there are tags visible, they may not be able to be managed on the Preview pane or the file preferences. File Explorer search seems to find all keywords so far. However, you don't know that a specific file was found because of a tag or anything else since this visualization is missing.

History, Implementation Details, and Similar Implementations

You can read about the history of this feature and some technical details on this page. Basically, NTFS stores the meta-data within an Alternate data streams (ADS). This is quite similar to how Apple stored meta-data in HFS+ and probably also within AFS. I was using the color labels of OS X up to Leopard. They ended up as file-system based meta-data as well.

You can read on this Wikipedia article:

In Apple's macOS, the operating system has allowed users to assign multiple arbitrary tags as extended file attributes to any file or folder ever since OS X 10.9 was released in 2013, and before that time the open-source OpenMeta standard provided similar tagging functionality in macOS.

Windows 10 Tags Considered as Fragile

I do think that the average reader does agree that using tags with this Windows 10 feature is a drag from the user experience point of view already. I do have sad news: this now even gets worse.

Since meta-data are stored in NTFS data streams, you are losing all of the tags when files get moved to someplace where there are no NTFS data streams or when applications generating files do not respect them properly. As a consequence, there are many possibilities where meta-data gets lost. Here is a list of the most obvious ones.

  1. Losing meta-data when copying to a thumb drive
    • Copying a tagged file to a drive that is not formatted with NTFS results in a silent loss of the meta-data. Thumb drives usually are formatted with FAT32.
  2. Losing meta-data when sending them via email
    • When you attach a tagged file to an email, the meta-data does not get attached as well.
  3. Losing meta-data because of applications handling temporary files
    • When you open a file in too many Windows applications, new modifications by the user get written to a temporary file. On saving the changes to the file, this temporary file then gets renamed to the original file name, overwriting the previous file as well as the meta-data. This is a very mean behavior since users would never expect to lose meta-data just by saving a file.
  4. Losing meta-data when doing backup
    • When you back up your data, the backup application needs to save and restore meta-data within ADS properly. I did not investigate this issue but my gut feelings are that only a fraction of the tools on the market do consider ADS meta-data and handle them accordingly.

Summary and Remarks

After being enthusiastic when I found out that Microsoft provides a native file tagging ecosystem with Windows, I had to take a closer look. This enthusiasm was replaced by a disillusion. Everything related to file tagging is hidden from the common user by default. Enabling it results in manual labor not only for the UI but also for each and every file extension separately. Although there are some nice retrieval features for navigation, search does not differ between keywords in tags and keywords anywhere else. It is not entirely clear to me how file-format-specific tags interact with the NTFS tags. Finally, when you did invest some time for tagging files, there is a high chance of losing all this meta-data sometimes without even realizing it.

If Microsoft would act in a way that somebody would be thinking that this tagging feature is ready for production, it would qualify for my bad design decisions series. For me personally, I'd never invest anything in using this feature mainly because of the many ways of losing meta-data without noticing. My current approach for tagging is described on this article. It's an OS-independent and app-independent method with very nice features like TagTrees you can not find elsewhere.

If you would like to get an overview on other non-file-system-based tagging solutions, you can read the bachelor thesis "Marktübersicht von Tagging-Werkzeugen und Vergleich mit tagstore" which can be downloaded at the tagstore page. It's in German language and it reflects the situation of the year 2013.

Before writing this article I needed to implement a necessary feature for my blogging system beforehand. With this, you are now able to click on the screenshot previews to see them with their original size. So this article was in my personal pipe-line for over a year. As a consequence, early findings and screen shots from 2018 are based on whereas the most current ones from 2019 are based on .

Congratulations for following this very long blog article until its end. I hope I could teach you something on Windows 10 functions and help you decide on its usefulness for your situation. Drop me a line in the comments below when you do have some questions or remarks.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Windows 10 has a powerful in-built search function, which allows you to locate a specific file in a matter of seconds. The Cortana allows you to find anything more quickly using smart filters such as file type and storage location. Alternatively, you can also use the File Explorer to know the name and/or the type of the file you are looking for.

This means that without it can be challenging to find a specific file without its correct name, especially when you are handling thousands of files. Fortunately, you can add tags to your files and improve the search speed in Windows 10. Furthermore, tags enable you to organize your files into categories without having to create several folders or renaming the files. This post will guide you on how to add tags and use them to search for files.

What are Tags in Windows 10?

Tags are simply keywords (metadata) that forms part of the properties of a file(s). You can use tags to categorize your files into projects, status or any other classifications. For instance, you can label your photos according to locations or events, mark your unfinished project documents and so on, simplifying file management in file explorer. You can use these tags to group related files or for a quicker search.

How to Add Tags in Windows 10?

Windows 10 supports tags for various types of files such as Microsoft Office files, images, videos and audios among others. There are three simple methods for adding tags:

Option 1: Adding Tags from “Properties” Dialog

  • Open the directory/folder containing the files, click your file of interest and select “Properties” from the context menu.
  • On the “Properties” dialogue, go to the “Details” tab and look for “Tags” in the “Description” section.
  • Click the space beside “Tags” to activate text and type the tag. If you want to add multiple tags, names with a semi-colon and click “Apply” then “Ok”.
Add Tag to File
  • You can also add tags to multiple files by selecting the files and then repeat steps 1-3 above and then click the “Ok” button.
Tagging Multiple Files

Option 2: Adding Tags in Windows Explorer “Details Pane”

  • To show the “Details Pane”, click the “View” menu and click the “Details Pane” option located at the left edge of the explorer toolbar.
Show Details
  • Select the files or multiple files that you want to tag and on the right-side panel, add the tag(s) on the text box next to the “Tags” heading. The click the “Save” button at the bottom of the file details.
  • Note that if you are adding an existing tag, Windows gives you suggestion and you only need to check the box to add.
Tagging Files

Option 3: Adding Tags in Save Dialog

You can add tags to your file such as Word document in the save dialog.

  • Open the document, go to the “File” menu and click “Save” for a new document or “Save As” for existing documents.
Saving File
  • At the bottom of the “Save As”dialog window, click the space next to “Tags” and type the keywords of choice, then click the “Save” button.
Save Tagging

Related:How to protect your Windows 10 PC?

Effectively Using Tags in Windows 10

Now that you have learnt different ways of adding tags in Windows. You can follow one of the easy ways that works for you. After adding tags to your files and folders, you can use the tags to search and get the results quickly.

Using Tags to Search in Windows 10 File Explorer

  • Open the File Explorer by pressing “Win + E” keys.
  • Click on the search box and then go to the “Search Tools” in the menu bar.
  • Select “Other properties” to expand the options.
  • Click “Tags” to allow Windows to reference tags when looking for the file.
Search by Tags
  • Type the tag and wait for Windows to search for files associated with the tag.
  • For example, we can search for “Project 1” files, all files with work in progress, “WIP” or photos with flowering trees, “Flowering” and so on.
Tag Search Result

Using Tags to Group Related or Sort Files

  • To sort the file using the tags, go to the “View” menu, click the “Sort by” arrow and check the “Tags” option.
Sorting by Tags
  • Click the “Group by” arrow and choose “Tags” to categorize related files. You can click to expand the different groups.

Using Tags to Filter Files in the Same Directory

  • When working on a particular directory, you can filter the files using tags.
  • First, you need to add the “Tags” column by expanding the “Add columns” option in view tools and then check “Tags”.
Add Tag Column
  • Click the arrow beside the column header “Tags” and check the appropriate tags.
Filtering with Tags

Final Remarks

To enhance your file management efficiency, you can add tags (keywords) to your file to help you search and find a particular file in file explorer. You can add tags to single or multiple files and use them to organize files into their respective categories or filter files within a folder. The above guide teaches you how to add and use file tags in Windows 10, but it is important to note that Windows support tags in selected file types. However, you can find third-party software that enables tagging of other file types.

Tags: File ExplorerSearchTags

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How to Tag Files in Windows 10

What to Know

  • Right-click the file and select Properties. On the Details tab, select Tags to add your tags, separating each one with a semicolon.
  • Alternatively, open File Explorer and select View > Details Pane on the ribbon. Select the file, then select Add a tag in the Details pane.
  • To search for tagged files in the File Explorer, enter tag: followed by your keyword in the search bar to the right of the window.

If you have tons of files stored in Windows, you know how hard it can be to find the right file when you need it. Fortunately, you can tag supported files in Windows 10 with one or more relevant keywords to make it simple to find them using Windows File Search.

Not all files stored in Windows can be tagged. Tagging is only supported on images, documents, and videos. And, in some cases, even some supported file types may not allow tagging.

How to Add Tags to a File in Windows 10

Although it's not intuitive to tag files in Windows 10, it's also not difficult once you've walked through it a few times. There are two ways to find and use the file tagging capabilities in Windows 10: from the Properties Window and from a file's Details Pane.

How to Tag Files in the Properties Window

By default, the Properties Window is hidden in Windows 10. To find the Properties Window and tag your files, use these steps:

  1. Open File Explorer.

  2. Navigate to the file you want to tag and right-click it.

  3. In the menu that appears, select Properties.

  4. In the Properties window, select the Details tab.

  5. On the Details tab, double-click the Tags line to add one or more tags, separating each one with a semicolon.

  6. Press Enter when you've finished adding tags to apply them to the file.

  7. Click Apply to save your changes.

  8. Click OK to close the Properties window.

You can select multiple files to tag them all at one time.

How to Tag Files in the Details Pane

By default, the Details Pane is also hidden in Windows 10. To access it take just a few clicks:

  1. Open File Explorer.

  2. Navigate to and select the file you want to tag.

  3. On the Ribbon, select the View tab.

  4. From the View Ribbon, select the Details Pane.

  5. In the Details Pane, click Add a tag and type the tags you want to assign to the file. Remember to separate tags with a semicolon.

  6. When you're done, press Enter or click Save to assign the tags.

You can select multiple files to assign the same tags to all of them, all at one time.

Once you have tagged your files, moving them to another computer or an external hard drive that uses a different file system than the one on which the files were tagged could cause the assigned tags to be erased.

Search for Tagged Files in Windows 10

Once you've added tags to your files, searching them becomes easier (and faster) because you can use a specific search string to find the tags you've created. To search for tagged files, in the File Explorer, use the search bar to the right of the window and use this search string:

tag: your keyword

Replace your keyword with the name of the tag you're trying to find. The search results should return only files that contain the specified tags.

Thanks for letting us know!

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Forget Folders: The Best Ways to Organize Your Files with Tags and Labels

Trying to find old files is like trying to go back in time and read your own mind. Where would I have saved those pictures from Australia?!? you think, before spending a frustrating half hour digging through folders and folders of miscellaneous images. What would I have called that report I wrote in August 2012?!?

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Tags (or labels in some apps) can eliminate these exasperating and time-consuming mental exercises. With a couple of tags, you can instantly categorize and label files for hassle-free searches down the road, and then find all of those files again easily no matter where you save them.

Let's explore why tagging is so useful, and how to set up your own tag system. Then, we’ll dive into how to tag your emails, photos, notes, and files, and glance at the benefits of using tags alongside folders.



Intro to Tagging

Tags

Tags are keywords you assign to files. Think of them like characteristics for a person: Just like you’d describe someone as "tall," "funny," "brunette," and so on, you’d tag a file "important," "tax info," "just for fun," or "work."

But why use tags, when you could just use folders?

A file can only be in one folder at a time—but it could have an unlimited number of tags. Say you've made a project brief for a client and you want to save it in the specific project folder and to the client’s main folder. With folders, you'd have to pick one folder or duplicate the file, which could cause issues. Tags, on the other hand, are perfect for adding category data like this, since you can add as many tags as you want to a file. You could tag the document with both the project’s name and the client’s name, then save the file just in the project's folder.

Tags are the simplest way to add data to files without dealing with endless layers of folders. They're perhaps your most flexible tool for organizing your files.

Related: Folders are still essential, however. Here's how to best organize your files and folders.

Tagging Best Practices

Of course, the flexibility and unlimited nature of tags can be dangerous. It’s easy to spend fifteen extra minutes adding a ton of tags every time you save a new file—and it’s also easy to create so many different tags that you completely forget which ones you’ve used.

How to Establish a Tag System

Luckily, you can avoid these issues by establishing a system. Your first step: Figure out your high-level tags. These types of tags divide your content into the most general categories possible, which usually means by type. Examples:

  • A bookstore creates separate spaces for books depending on their genre: mystery, romance, historical fiction, and so on.

  • If you’re making a tag system for your spreadsheets, your high-level tags might be "budget," "schedule," "estimate," "invoice," and "Gantt charts."

  • if you're building a system for documents, you could add tags for "reports," "blog posts," "letters," and so forth.

Also consider making tags for the status of your files. I tag (or label) my emails as "Answer," "Done," "Pending," and "Ignore," for example. Being able to sort my inbox into these categories helps me stay on top of things.

Make Your Tags Consistent

Strive for consistency with your tags. For instance, will you use singular or plural terms ("report" versus "reports"?) Which word type will you use: nouns, adjectives, verbs, or a combination of the three? Are you going to capitalize tags or leave them lowercase? Will you incorporate symbols and characters? The more standardized your system is, the easier it’ll be to find files.

As a rule of thumb, keep your tags to two words or less. If you find yourself going over that limit, it may make more sense to create two separate tags—for example, rather than tagging something as "Q1 expense report," you could tag it as "Q1" and "expense report."

Once you’ve come up with 10-plus tags, it’s a good idea to create a master list. I use an Evernote note to keep track of all my tags. This list helps jog my memory if I ever forget a tag; plus, I can periodically look it over to find and delete tags I didn’t end up needing.

Use Tags with Folders

Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders *and* tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

Not everyone is a fan of using tags. Tiago Forte, founder of productivity training firm Forte Labs, explains, "When you rely heavily on tags, you have to perfectly recall every single tag you’ve ever used, and exactly how it is spelled and punctuated."

Plus, Forte says, it’s much easier to remember things with physical locations. That’s why you have to concentrate on memorizing a single phone number, but you can immediately recall where you left hundreds of items in your home.

"Tags force us to think about our notes in a completely abstract way," he argues. Folders, on the other hand, let us "place" our notes in a single physical location.

Forte definitely has a point. It can be time-consuming to tag every file—especially if you can’t remember those tags when you need them. If you’re producing a relatively small amount of work, using tags might not be productive.

However, there’s also a case to be made for a folder and tag system.

Four researchers from the University of Washington studied the comparative benefits folders and tags. According to their research, it’s easier to find files using labels rather than folders. Plus, picking out the right folder can take more work than choosing tags, because you have to select the "right" one. However, because folders let you visually put away your work, they make you feel more organized.

Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders and tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

And great news: we’ve got a comprehensive guide to organizing your files and folders.


Now that you've got a tag system, let's put it to work. Here's how you can organize your email, photos, notes, and files with tags.

Tag Your Email Messages

We receive a lot of email each day—too much, in fact. With so many messages flowing in and out of your inbox, being able to quickly organize them with tags could make the difference between order and chaos.

Gmail introduced labels (which are tags) to email when it first launched in 2004, and today it's still the leader in tagging emails. Here's how to use its tag tools to sort your messages.

How to Label Emails in Gmail (Web, iOS, Android)

Gmail

To use labels in Gmail, you’ll have to manually tag each email or take a bit more time to create filters to add them. You can find the Labels option by clicking the gear icon, choosing "Settings," and navigating to the "Labels" tab.

Scroll down to the bottom and select "Create new label." You can choose when the label shows up in your label list and inbox. If you have more than five labels, I recommend using the "show if unread" feature so they only show up when you have unopened emails.

Gmail also lets you color-code labels for a way to identify them at a glance. Find your label in the sidebar, hover over it, and then click the small three-dot icon next to its name. Then select choose "Label color." You can choose from pre-existing colors, or even create your own.

Tip: Learn how to get the most out of Gmail's labels—and add them to emails automatically with filters—in Zapier's Gmail Guide.

Of course, other email programs also offer tagging or labeling options. In Microsoft Outlook, for example, common tags—called Categories—are already set up for you, but you can edit them, create new ones, and color-code them too.

Tag Your Photos

Finding a specific picture can take forever. First, you have to remember where you saved it on your computer. Then, you have to dig through thousands of photos before finding the one you were looking for. Unless you name each photo, you can’t look up the title of a photo the same way you’d type in the name of a spreadsheet or presentation, so manually combing through your archives is typically your best option.

Tags make finding photos far speedier. Just tag each with its location, subject, date, and the people in it, and you’ll have four different ways to locate it. Creating your own tags will give you even more options.

You'll find tags in advanced photo management tools like Lightroom, but here are some simpler apps to help organize your photo library.

Pixave (Mac)

Pixave

When you save multiple photos, you probably want to apply one or more tags to all of them. For instance, if you import 30 pictures from your last family reunion, you’d tag all 30 with "family reunion," the location, and the date. Pixave makes it easy to add multiple tags to multiple images at once. With its drag and drop tagging, you can simply highlight the relevant tags and place them on the matching pictures.

When you’re exporting images, the app saves their tags as keywords in their metadata. That means you won’t have to go through the hard work of re-labeling images once you’ve moved them to another platform.

And Pixave also automatically import images from a designated folder and apply tags for you. Talk about convenience!

Price: $14.99

Google Photos (Web, iOS, Android)

Google Photos

Technically, Google Photos is the anti-tagging tool. There’s no way to add tags within the app—the closest you can get is adding labels to people’s faces (e.g. "Daniel" or "Aja").

But Google Photos has such a powerful search, you'll feel like you've already added tags to every photo. It uses Google's AI to identify objects in your photos, so you can search for "watermelon" or "water sports" and find photos containing either in seconds.

It's magical—and if every app's search worked this well, you wouldn't need tags nearly as much.

Price: Free

Tip: The latest version of Apple Photos includes similar features, identifying locations and common objects in the photos on your iPhone, iPad, and macOS.

Tag Your Notes

You probably take notes all day long: in the morning, when you think of a random idea; on the subway, when you jot down a question; at your desk, when you write down your goals for the next day, and so on. Recording your miscellaneous thoughts is helpful—but only if you can find them again later.

Tags give you the power to organize a vast web of interconnected ideas, where saving notes in individual notebooks just won't cut it. Here's how to organize your notes with tags.

Evernote (Web, macOS, PC, iOS, Android)

Evernote clipper

This notebook app wants to be your digital memory, housing everything from simple checklists and detailed checklists to images, PDFs, documents, and more. Of course, the more content you collect, the more important tags become.

Evernote makes adding tags a cinch. If you use the app’s web extension, you can tag files while you save them. To tag a current note within the app, click the small "tag" icon next to the name of its notebook.

It’s also easy to browse your notes by tag. On the left menu sidebar, click on "Tags" to see all of your tags.

Evernote also lets you create nested tags, something you don't usually find with tags in other apps. For example, engineer Thomas Honeyman created a parent tag for "Projects" with three child tags: "Artistic projects," "Business projects," and "School projects."

To create your own tag hierarchy, open up the "Tags" page, then drag and drop the sub-tag onto the main one.

Tags appear alphabetically by default. If you want, say, "Work task" to appear before "Grocery list," use a hashtag, period, or symbol. The tags with non-alphanumeric symbols will show up last.

Price: Free Basic plan for standard features for 2 devices and up to 60MB uploads per month; from $7.99/month Premium plan for unlimited devices, 10GB monthly uploads, and features like offline notebook access; $14.99/user/month for Evernote Business

For a deeper look at Evernote features and pricing plans, check out ourEvernote review.

See Evernote integrations on Zapier

Learn more about Evernote with our roundup of 30 Evernote Tips and Tricks.

OneNote (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android)

OneNote

Looking for a way to tag specific sections of your notes, rather than the entire document? OneNote lets you do just that—and a lot more. Its searchable tags make it easy to pull up every related snippet of your work. For example, you can tag one part of your note with the "idea" tag and another as a "to do."

When you search OneNote for a tag, the Tag Summary page will show you all the related notes and give you the option of grouping tags, too.

Price: Free

Tag Your Files

The latest versions of macOS and Windows make it easy to add tags to almost anything.

Mac

Tagging on the Mac

Thanks to macOS' tagging feature, you can find any file on your Mac in just three steps. Step one: press command + space to open Spotlight. Step two: enter your tag (or tags). Step three: look through the results to find the right file.

But before you can become a master of the quick search, you’ll need to actually tag your files. It’s easy to add tags while saving a file: Just choose the relevant ones from the drop-down menu underneath the file’s name or type a new tag to add it to the list.

If you want to tag a file you’ve already saved, find it in your Finder window, right-click, and select "Tags." You’ll be able to add existing tags or create new ones.

By default, the built-in color tags show up in your Sidebar menu. However, you’ll probably want to customize this section so it displays your most important or frequently used tags. To do so, open Finder, click "Preferences," and select "Tags," then drag-and-drop the tags into the order you want. You can also change each tag’s color.

Windows

Tags in Windows

Windows users can harness the power of tags as well. When you’re saving specific file types (including Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, Powerpoints, photos, videos, and new folders) you can add tags using the "Tags" field.

Looking to label a file you’ve already saved? Click on it to open its details, then you should see the option to type new tags under the "Date created" field.

For the majority of people, these options will be enough. But if you want to tag non-supported file types, like plain text (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf) files, upgrade to a third-party tagging app.

Price: Free

The Best Apps to Tag Your Files

Not content with your computer’s built-in file management system? Luckily, there are plenty of third-party apps to choose from. These options all make it simple to add, edit, and find tags.

TagSpaces (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android, Linux)

TagSpaces

Most of us take a squirrel-like approach to our files, saving some in Dropbox, some on our computer, some in Google Drive, some in Evernote, and so forth. That means it’s tricky to find files even with tags—after all, before you can search "resume" and "marketing jobs," you have to first remember where you saved all your resume drafts.

That's where TagSpaces comes in. This free app provides cross-platform file tagging and finding, so that you can organize everything the same way regardless of where it’s saved. In other words, if you type "resume" and "marketing jobs" into TagSpaces, it’ll search through every file you’ve ever saved to find the ones with those tags.

However, that’s not the only reason to download TagSpaces. It also lets you bulk tag files, which is handy when you’re downloading, say, photos from your hackathon, or the presentations from a conference. Even better, you can create tag groups. To give you an idea, you could make a "sales team" tag group containing tags for each individual sales rep.

Smart tags are also handy. These automatic, time-sensitive tags let you quickly find files by when you saved them; for instance, if you wanted to locate a document you’d saved this morning, you’d search with the "today" tag.

Price: Free

Tabbles (Windows)

Tabbles

Visual thinkers, rejoice: Tabbles was designed with you in mind. Every tag is represented by a colorful bubble called a "tabble." When you want to place a file into a tabble, you simply drag-and-drop it. That might sound a bit like putting a file into a folder, but files can belong to an unlimited number of tabbles at once.

What if you’re putting the same types of files into the same tabbles over and over again? Rather than doing unnecessary work, set up tagging rules. You can define which tabbles new files are housed in based on their name, file type, content, or some combination of the above. As an example, imagine you want every Powerpoint file with "winter conference" in its name to be saved to the "Winter Conference" and "Work Presentations" tabbles.

Tabbles is free for up to 5,000 files. Paid options offeryou can save an unlimited number of files; plus, you can integrate with cloud sync servers and share your tags with your coworkers.

Price: Free for up to 5,000 files; from €1,5/month for paid options, which include more files, tag sharing, and syncing tags across multiple devices

Turn Tags into Actions

Does the thought of going through and tagging each and every file in your digital archives sound overwhelming? It did to me—so I decided to start fresh. Every new file I save gets tagged, but I don’t worry about the old ones. I’d definitely recommend this strategy if you’ve already got a full library of files and not enough time to categorize them all.

If you want to take your tagging to the next level, create a workflow that sends information you tag in one app to another with Zapier, an app integration tool. You can automatically send messages from Gmail with a specific tag (label) to a new card in Trello, for example, or create notes with a specific tag in Evernote from one of your other favorite apps.

Here are some ideas to help get you started turning tags into actions:

Organize Emails and Contacts

Save Tagged Articles

Share Tagged Posts


Happy tagging!

This post was originally published in August 2016 and updated for current app info and other details.

Title image by Metaphox via Flickr. Tags photo by Gustavo da Cunha Pimenta.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
OverviewSystem RequirementsRelated

Description

Are you tired with organizing file in the traditional folder structure? Is your folder structure is so complex difficult to find files? Looking for a simple and fun way to organize files? Then Tag Explorer is the ultimate solution for you. Tag Explorer is a simple but yet powerful file management software. It goes beyond traditional file management tools like windows explorer and the folder system. Simply assign any number of tags to files and browse files by their tags. Unlike traditional folder, structure tags don't have any hierarchy and you can browse file by any order you want.

What's new in this version

Add Content view Add open in File Explorer feature

Features

  • A file can have any number of Tags.
  • Group Tags to more organize.
  • Search files by multiple tags.
  • Child folders inherit tags from parent folder.

System Requirements

OSWindows 10 version 10240.0 or higher, Windows 8.1
ArchitectureARM, x64, x86
KeyboardIntegrated Keyboard
MouseIntegrated Mouse
OSWindows 10 version 10240.0 or higher, Windows 8.1
ArchitectureARM, x64, x86
KeyboardNot specified
MouseNot specified
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How to use the Windows Tags property to manage Office files

picstudioistock-686632992.jpg

Sometimes you don't know you need a feature until you discover it and put it to use for a bit. Then you wonder how you ever got your work done without it! That's how you might feel about Windows Tags. Yes, it's a Windows feature, but you can use Tags to manage Office files--and other file types as well. Whether you work alone or share files via a server or even OneDrive for Business, you can benefit from Tags. In this article, I'll show you how to add Tags to Office and non-Office files and how to search using those Tags.

I'm working with Office 2016 (desktop) on a Windows 10 64-bit system. The Windows Tags property is available in older versions, back to Windows Vista. In Office, they've been available since at least Office 2007 (but maybe longer). There's no downloadable demonstration file. You won't need one.

SEE: Windows 10 power tips: Secret shortcuts to your favorite settings (Tech Pro Research)

What are Tags?

Don't confuse Office Smart Tags and Windows Tags; they aren't the same thing. Windows Tags are keywords used for organizing (searching) files. How you use them will depend on your needs, but anytime you're working with bulk files or sharing files for the same purpose, Tags can help. Don't limit their use to simply describing the file's contents, either. You can use Tags to describe how you use the file. For instance, you might use terms such as complete and not complete to describe status. Or you might use the term upload to group files you need to upload to an external service such as OneDrive.

Add a tag to an Office file

Tags are a Windows file property, but you can add them when saving an Office file. During the save process, you'll see an Options link. It's quite possible that you've never explored this link before. Let's take a look:

  1. With any Office file open, click the File tab and choose Save As in the left pane.
  2. Below the Filename and Location controls, click the More Options link (Figure A).
  3. In the bottom-right corner of the resulting dialog, look for the Tags control (Figure B).
  4. Click the Add A Tag Link and supply a keyword (Figure C). To add more than one, separate the keywords with a semicolon. Once you add a Tags keyword, Office will display it in an AutoComplete list when you tag subsequent files, making it easier to use Tags consistently.
  5. Click Save and continue as you normally would.

Figure A

wordtagsa.jpg
Click the More Options link.

Figure B

wordtagsb.jpg
Click the Tags control and start entering keywords.

Figure C

wordtagsc.jpg
Separate keywords with a semicolon.

You can add Tags to all your Office files this way. Although I showed you only one, you might have several files that warrant a plant sale or 2018 keyword. Following our example, you have a plant list in Excel, but you might also have a vendor contract in Word and several graphic files you're using in different publicity venues.

SEE: Microsoft Power BI: Getting started with data visualization (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

Searching

Now let's use File Explorer to find all your plant sale files. You could run a quick search on your local drive using any number of search strings: plant list, contract, and so on. If you use this route, you know that a search can take a while and it often turns up a lot of files you're not looking for. As you can see in Figure D, what you might expect to be a simple search for your Word contract is anything but. A similar search on 2018 could return similar or even worse results.

Figure D

wordtagsd.jpg
A search on contract returns a lot of files.

Okay, I confess: The above search is unnecessarily complicated--I did that on purpose. If you see a lot of files you can't identify, check the Advanced Options dropdown and make sure System Files is unchecked (unless you're looking for system files). Doing so will improve most search tasks, with or without Tags.

However, thanks to Tags, you don't have to second guess, remember every related file you've generated or updated, or wade through busy search results. Even if the search includes system files (as above), you won't see a lot of unexpected files. You'll see only the files you've tagged accordingly.

To pinpoint just the files you want to see related to your plant sale, open File Explorer and click This PC (or a folder, a server drive, or OneDrive). Enter a search string in the following form:

Tags: search string

As you can see in Figure E, the search on Tags: plant sale matches only two files: the plant list in Excel and the vendor contract in Word. If you know where the files are, you can run a quicker search by selecting that folder before executing the search. If you're like me, some folders contain a lot of files and a Tags search is often easier and quicker than a normal alphabetical list.

Figure E

wordtagse.jpg
Using the plant sale Tags keyword reduces the number of files returned.

Not all formats are equal

Not all software allows you to add Tags when saving a file, but that's not a problem. You can use File Explorer to add Tags:

  1. Open File Explorer and select the file you want to tag.
  2. On the View tab, click Details in the Panes group to open the Details pane.
  3. Enter the appropriate Tags (Figure F).
  4. Click Save.

Figure F

wordtagsf.jpg
Enter your Tags.

Now when you run the same search, Tags: plant sale, File Explorer returns the first two files and the .jpg, as shown in Figure G.

Figure G

wordtagsg.jpg
This time, the search found three tagged files.

Using File Explorer, you can sort and group a folder's contents using Tags. Simply click the View tab and choose Tags from the Sort By or Group By dropdown. Or right-click the background and choose Tags from the Sort By or Group By options. In addition, you can filter for Tags. As Figure H shows, you can filter for specific Tags if you're using the Details view. This is great when you know all your files are in the same folder.

Figure H

wordtagsh.jpg
You can also filter by Tags.

Using File Explorer, you can add Tags to several files at the same time. Hold down the Ctrl key while selecting files to create a multi-file selection. Then, add Tags as you normally would. If you add a file to the selection that doesn't allow tagging, the Tags control won't be accessible for any of the files, so be careful.

SEE: Four ways to specify dates using Excel data validation (TechRepublic)

Only as good...

Tags, or keywords, are only as good as the people adding them. If you work alone, this is easy. If you're trying to corral files for an organization, it's much harder. Everyone may not be on the same page, so searches will be incomplete at best. That might be one reason they're not more popular. Even using File Explorer, you can't add Tags to every file type. For instance, you can't tag a .txt file.

In addition, you can use any of the properties via the Details pane in the same way. For instance, for Content status, you might enter Incomplete and Complete. To search, you'd use the string Contentstatus: Complete. You can also use wildcards. To see all tagged files, you'd enter Tags: -[]. That means that where Tags isn't null. As you can see, there's a lot to explore!

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If Windows Search just isn’t cutting it for helping you find your files, you can give it a little help by adding tags to many file types, from images in JPEG and PNG format to Office documents in DOCX, XLSX, and PPTX format.

Tags work more or less like they do in any other system—photo libraries, social networks, et cetera. Unfortunately, there’s no way for Windows to auto-generate tags by itself. You’ll have to add and manage them manually. Then again, that might be a plus, depending on your personal style of organisation.

Tagging Files in Windows Explorer

Let’s take a look at my disorganized Pictures folder for an example. I use some subfolders for basic organization, but none of the files in the main folder are really named correctly—it’s just a bunch of stuff that doesn’t fit anywhere else.

I’ll use this old stock photo of Adam West as an example. To tag any file, right-click it in Explorer, and then click the “Properties” command. In the image’s properties window, switch over to the “Details” tab. You’ll see the “Tags” entry in the “Description” section.

(If you don’t see a “Tags” entry here, that file type doesn’t support tags.)

To the right of the “Tags” entry, click the empty space in the “Value” column and a text box appears that just contains some “Add a tag” text. Type any tag you’d like to add. There are no predefined tags, so what you type is up to you. A tag can be any length and use any kind of standard character, including spaces, though we recommend keeping them reasonably short and easy to remember.

If you want to add multiple tags at once, just separate them with a semicolon.

When you’re done tagging, just click “OK” to finish.

Using Tags to Search

After you’ve tagged some files, you can then use those tags in your searches. But things are a little weird, depending on where you’re doing your searching.

In File Explorer, if you have the folder open where the file is contained, you can just type a tag into the search box and Windows will show you files tagged that way. Of course, the results also include any files that have that text in the name or other searchable content.

However, if you’re outside that folder (say, you want to search your whole PC or the entire Documents folder), you’ll have to add the “tags:” operator to the beginning of your search. The easiest way to do this is to just type “tags:” into the search box, and then type the tag text for which you want to search.

You can also add that operator from the “Search” tab on File Explorer’s Ribbon, if you want. It’s more cumbersome than just typing the operator, but it might be useful if you’ve already performed a search and just want to narrow it down to tags.

Tagging Files While Saving in Microsoft Office

Some apps, including all the Microsoft Office apps, let you add tags to files as you save them. Other apps, like Photoshop, do not. You’ll just have to play around with your apps to see which allow saving with tags.

Here’s how it looks in Word 2016. When you’re saving a document, just click the “More Options” link to open the full Save As dialog box.

You’ll find a “Tags” box tucked under the file type dropdown menu. Click the box, and then type whatever tags you like.

If you start typing a tag you’ve used before, Word will even pop up some suggestions.

To remove tags, just click the tag box, and then delete the tags you no longer want. Save the file again and the changes are applied.

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Forget Folders: The Best Ways to Organize Your Files with Tags and Labels

Trying to find old files is like trying to go back in time and read your own mind. Where would I have saved those pictures from Australia?!? you think, before spending a frustrating half hour digging through folders and folders of miscellaneous images. What would I have called that report I wrote in August 2012?!?

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Keep your files and folders organized with automation.

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Tags (or labels in some apps) can eliminate these exasperating and time-consuming mental exercises. With a couple of tags, you can instantly categorize and label files for hassle-free searches down the road, and then find all of those files again easily no matter where you save them.

Let's explore why tagging is so useful, and how to set up your own tag system. Then, we’ll dive into how to tag your emails, photos, notes, and files, and glance at the benefits of using tags alongside folders.



Intro to Tagging

Tags

Tags are keywords you assign to files. Think of them like characteristics for a person: Just like you’d describe someone as "tall," "funny," "brunette," and so on, you’d tag a file "important," "tax info," "just for fun," or "work."

But why use tags, when you could just use folders?

A file can only be in one folder at a time—but it could have an unlimited number of tags. Say you've made a project brief for a client and you want to save it in the specific project folder and to the client’s main folder. With folders, you'd have to pick one folder or duplicate the file, which could cause issues. Tags, on the other hand, are perfect for adding category data like this, since you can add as many tags as you want to a file. You could tag the document with both the project’s name and the client’s name, then save the file just in the project's folder.

Tags are the simplest way to add data to files without dealing with endless layers of folders. They're perhaps your most flexible tool for organizing your files.

Related: Folders are still essential, however. Here's how to best organize your files and folders.

Tagging Best Practices

Of course, the flexibility and unlimited nature of tags can be dangerous. It’s easy to spend fifteen extra minutes adding a ton of tags every time you save a new file—and it’s also easy to create so many different tags that you completely forget which ones you’ve used.

How to Establish a Tag System

Luckily, you can avoid these issues by establishing a system. Your first step: Figure out your high-level tags. These types of tags divide your content into the most general categories possible, which usually means by type. Examples:

  • A bookstore creates separate spaces for books depending on their genre: mystery, romance, historical fiction, and so on.

  • If you’re making a tag system for your spreadsheets, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version high-level tags might be "budget," "schedule," "estimate," "invoice," and "Gantt charts."

  • if you're building a system for documents, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, you could add tags for "reports," "blog posts," "letters," and so forth.

Also consider making tags for the status of your files. I tag (or label) my emails as "Answer," "Done," "Pending," and "Ignore," for example, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. Being able to sort my inbox into these categories helps me stay on top of things.

Make Your Tags Consistent

Strive for consistency with your tags. For instance, will you use singular or plural terms ("report" versus "reports"?) Which word type will you use: nouns, adjectives, verbs, or a combination of the three? Are you going to capitalize tags or leave them Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version Will you incorporate symbols and characters? The more standardized your system is, the easier it’ll be to find files.

As a Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version of thumb, keep your tags to two words or less. If you find yourself going over that limit, it may make more sense to create two separate tags—for example, rather than tagging something as "Q1 expense report," you could tag it as "Q1" and "expense report."

Once you’ve come up with 10-plus tags, it’s a good idea to create a master list. I use an Evernote note to keep track of all my tags. This list helps jog my memory if I ever forget a tag; plus, I can periodically look it over to find and delete tags I didn’t end up needing.

Use Tags with Folders

Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders *and* tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

Not everyone is a fan of using tags. Tiago Forte, founder of productivity training firm Forte Labs, explains, "When you rely heavily on tags, you have to perfectly recall every single tag you’ve ever used, and exactly how it is spelled and punctuated."

Plus, Forte says, it’s much easier to remember things with physical locations. That’s why you have to concentrate on memorizing a single phone number, but you can immediately recall where you left hundreds of items in your home.

"Tags force us to think about our notes in a completely abstract way," he argues. Folders, on the other hand, let us "place" our notes in a single physical location.

Forte definitely has a point. It can be time-consuming to tag every file—especially if you can’t remember those tags when you need them. If you’re producing a relatively small amount of work, using tags might not be productive.

However, there’s also a case to be made for a folder and tag system.

Four researchers from the University of Washington studied the comparative benefits folders and tags. According to their research, it’s easier to find files using labels rather than folders. Plus, picking out the right folder can take more work than choosing tags, because you have to select the "right" one. However, because folders let you visually put away your work, they make you feel more organized.

Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders and tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

And great news: we’ve got a comprehensive guide to organizing your files and folders.


Now that you've got a tag system, let's put it to work. Here's how you can organize your email, photos, notes, and files with tags.

Tag Your Email Messages

We receive a lot of email each day—too much, in fact. With so many messages flowing in and out of your inbox, being able to quickly organize them with tags could make the difference between order and chaos.

Gmail introduced labels (which are tags) to email when it first launched in 2004, and today it's still the leader in tagging emails. Here's how to use its tag tools to sort your messages.

How to Label Emails in Gmail (Web, iOS, Android)

Gmail

To use labels in Gmail, you’ll have to manually tag each email or take a bit more time to create filters to add them. Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version can find the Labels option by clicking the gear icon, choosing "Settings," and navigating to the "Labels" tab.

Scroll down to the bottom and select "Create new label." You can choose when the label shows up in your label list and inbox. If you have more than five labels, I recommend using the "show if unread" feature so they only show up when you have unopened emails.

Gmail also lets you color-code labels for a way to identify them at a glance. Find your label in the sidebar, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, hover over it, and then click the small three-dot icon next to its name. Then select choose "Label color." You can choose from pre-existing colors, or even create your own.

Tip: Learn how to get the most out of Gmail's labels—and add them to emails automatically with filters—in Zapier's Gmail Guide.

Of course, other email programs also offer tagging or labeling options. In Microsoft Outlook, for example, common tags—called Categories—are already set up for you, but you can edit them, create new ones, and color-code them too.

Tag Your Photos

Finding a specific picture can take forever. First, you have to remember where you saved it on Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version computer. Then, you have to dig through thousands of photos before finding the one you were looking for. Unless you name each photo, you can’t look up the title of a photo the same way you’d type in the name of a spreadsheet or presentation, so manually combing through your archives is typically your best option.

Tags make finding photos far speedier. Just tag each with its location, subject, date, and the people in it, and you’ll have four different ways to locate it. Creating your own tags will give you even more options.

You'll find tags in advanced photo management tools like Lightroom, but here are some simpler apps to help organize your photo library.

Pixave (Mac)

Pixave

When you save multiple photos, you probably want to apply one or more tags to all of them. For instance, if you import 30 pictures from your last family reunion, you’d tag all 30 with "family reunion," the location, Download Microsoft Office 2019 Crack Archives the date. Pixave makes it easy to add multiple tags to multiple images at once. With its drag and drop tagging, you can simply highlight the relevant tags and place them on the matching pictures.

When you’re exporting images, the app saves their tags as keywords in their metadata. That means you won’t have to go through the hard work of re-labeling images once you’ve moved them to another platform.

And Pixave also automatically import images from a designated folder and apply tags for you. Talk about convenience!

Price: $14.99

Google Photos (Web, iOS, Android)

Google Photos

Technically, Google Photos is the anti-tagging tool. There’s no way to add tags within the app—the closest you can get is adding labels to people’s faces (e.g. "Daniel" or "Aja").

But Google Photos has such a powerful search, you'll feel like you've already added tags to every photo. It uses Google's AI to identify objects in your photos, so you can search for "watermelon" or "water sports" and find photos containing either in seconds.

It's magical—and if every app's search worked this well, you wouldn't need tags nearly as much.

Price: Free

Tip: The latest version of Apple Photos includes similar features, identifying locations and common objects in the photos on your iPhone, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, iPad, and macOS.

Tag Your Notes

You probably take notes all day long: in the morning, when you think of a random idea; on the subway, when you jot down a question; at your desk, when you write down your goals for the next day, and so on. Recording your miscellaneous thoughts is helpful—but only if you can find them again later.

Tags give you the power to organize a vast web of interconnected ideas, where saving notes in individual notebooks just won't cut it. Here's how to organize your notes with tags.

Evernote (Web, macOS, PC, iOS, Android)

Evernote clipper

This notebook app wants to be your digital memory, housing everything from simple checklists and detailed checklists to images, PDFs, documents, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, and more. Of course, the more content you collect, the more important tags become.

Evernote makes adding tags a cinch. If you use the app’s web extension, you can tag files while you save them. To tag a current note within the app, click the small "tag" icon next to the name of its notebook.

It’s also easy to browse your notes by tag. On the left menu sidebar, click on "Tags" to see all of your tags.

Evernote also lets you create nested tags, something you don't usually find with tags in other apps. For example, engineer Thomas Honeyman created a parent tag for "Projects" with three child tags: "Artistic projects," "Business projects," and "School projects."

To create your own tag hierarchy, open up the "Tags" page, then drag and drop the sub-tag onto the main one.

Tags appear alphabetically by default. If you want, say, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, "Work task" to appear before "Grocery list," use a hashtag, period, or symbol. The tags with non-alphanumeric symbols will show up last.

Price: Free Basic plan for standard features for 2 devices and up to 60MB uploads per month; from $7.99/month Premium plan for unlimited devices, 10GB monthly uploads, and features like offline notebook access; $14.99/user/month for Evernote Business

For a deeper look at Evernote features and pricing plans, check out ourEvernote review.

See Evernote integrations on Zapier

Learn more about Evernote with our roundup of 30 Evernote Tips and Tricks.

OneNote (Web, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android)

OneNote

Looking for a way to tag specific sections of your notes, rather than the entire document? OneNote lets you do just that—and a lot more. Its searchable tags make it easy to pull up every related snippet of your work. For example, you can tag one part of your note with the "idea" tag and another as a "to do."

When you search OneNote for a tag, the Tag Summary page will show you all the related notes and give you the option of grouping tags, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, too.

Price: Free

Tag Your Files

The latest versions of macOS and Windows make it easy to add tags to almost anything.

Mac

Tagging on the Mac

Thanks to macOS' tagging feature, you can find any file on your Mac in just three steps. Step one: Documents Archives - Cracked Software Links command + space to open Spotlight. Step two: enter your tag (or tags). Step three: look through the results to find the right file.

But before you can become a master of the quick search, you’ll need to actually tag your files, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. It’s easy to add tags while saving a file: Just choose the relevant ones from the drop-down menu underneath the file’s name or type a new tag to add it to the list.

If you want to tag a file you’ve already saved, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, find it in your Finder window, right-click, and select "Tags." You’ll be able to add existing tags or create new ones.

By default, the built-in color tags show up in your Sidebar menu. However, you’ll probably want to customize this section so it displays your most important or frequently used tags. To do so, open Finder, click "Preferences," and select "Tags," then drag-and-drop the tags into the order you want. You can also change each tag’s color.

Windows

Tags in Windows

Windows users can harness the power of tags as well. When you’re saving specific file types (including Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, Powerpoints, photos, videos, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, and new folders) you can add tags using the "Tags" field.

Looking to label a file you’ve already saved? Click on it to open its details, then you should see the option to type new tags under the "Date created" field.

For the majority of people, these options will be enough. But if you want to tag non-supported file types, like plain text (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf) files, upgrade to a third-party tagging app.

Price: Free

The Best Apps to Tag Your Files

Not content with your computer’s built-in file management system? Luckily, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, there are plenty of third-party apps to choose from. These options all make it simple to add, edit, and find tags.

TagSpaces (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android, Linux)

TagSpaces

Most of us take a squirrel-like approach to our files, saving some in Dropbox, some on our computer, some in Google Drive, some in Evernote, and so forth. That means it’s tricky to find files even with tags—after all, before you can search "resume" and "marketing jobs," you have to first remember where you saved all your resume drafts.

That's where TagSpaces comes in. This free app provides cross-platform file tagging and finding, so that you can organize everything the same way regardless of where it’s saved, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. In other words, if you type "resume" and "marketing jobs" into TagSpaces, it’ll search through every file you’ve ever saved to find the ones Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version those tags.

However, that’s not the only reason to download TagSpaces. It also lets you bulk tag files, which is handy when you’re downloading, say, photos from your hackathon, or the presentations from a conference. Even better, you can create tag groups. To give you an idea, you could make a "sales team" tag group containing tags for each individual sales rep.

Smart tags are Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version handy. These automatic, time-sensitive tags let you quickly find files by when you saved them; for instance, if you wanted to locate a document you’d saved this morning, you’d search with the "today" tag.

Price: Free

Tabbles (Windows)

Tabbles

Visual thinkers, rejoice: Tabbles was designed with you in mind. Every tag is represented by a colorful bubble called a "tabble." When you want to place a file into a tabble, you simply drag-and-drop it. That might sound a bit like putting a file into a folder, but files can belong to an unlimited number of tabbles at once.

What if you’re putting the same types of files into the same tabbles over and over again? Rather than doing unnecessary work, set xpand 2 vst free download Archives tagging rules. You can define which tabbles new files are housed in based on their name, file type, content, or some combination of the above. As an example, imagine you want every Powerpoint file with "winter conference" in its name Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version be saved to the "Winter Conference" and "Work Presentations" tabbles.

Tabbles is free for up to 5,000 files. Paid options offeryou can save an unlimited number of files; plus, you can integrate with cloud sync servers and share your tags with your coworkers.

Price: Free for up to 5,000 files; from 123 Outlook Express Backup 1.02 crack serial keygen for paid options, which include more files, tag sharing, and syncing tags across multiple devices

Turn Tags into Actions

Does the thought of going through and tagging each and every file in your digital archives sound overwhelming? It did to me—so I decided to start fresh. Every new file I save gets tagged, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, but I don’t worry about the old ones. I’d definitely recommend this strategy if you’ve already got a full library of files and not enough time to categorize them all.

If you want to take your tagging to the next level, create a workflow that sends information you tag in one app to Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version with Zapier, an app integration tool. You can automatically send messages from Gmail with a specific tag (label) Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version a new card in Trello, for download xlstat full Archives, or create notes with a specific tag in Evernote from one of your other favorite apps.

Here are some ideas to help get you started turning tags into actions:

Organize Emails and Contacts

Save Tagged Articles

Share Tagged Posts


Happy tagging!

This post was originally published in August 2016 and updated for current app info and other details.

Title image by Metaphox via Flickr. Tags photo by Gustavo da Cunha Pimenta.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Windows 10 has a powerful in-built search function, which allows you to locate a specific file in a matter of seconds. The Cortana allows you to find anything more quickly using smart filters such as file type and storage location. Alternatively, you can also use the File Explorer to know the name and/or the type of the file you are looking for.

This means that without it can be challenging to find a specific file without its correct name, especially when you are handling thousands of files. Fortunately, you can add tags to your files and improve the search speed in Windows 10. Furthermore, tags enable you to organize your files into categories without having to create several folders or renaming the files. This post will guide you on how to add tags and use them to search for files.

What are Tags in Windows 10?

Tags are simply keywords (metadata) that forms part of the properties of a file(s). You can use tags to categorize your files into projects, status or any other classifications. For instance, you can label your photos according to locations or events, mark your unfinished project documents and so on, simplifying file management in file explorer. You can use these tags to group related files or for a quicker search.

How to Add Tags in Windows 10?

Windows 10 supports tags for various types of files such as Microsoft Office files, images, videos and audios among others. There are three simple methods for adding tags:

Option 1: Adding Tags from “Properties” Dialog

  • Open the directory/folder containing the files, click your file of interest and select “Properties” from the context menu.
  • On the “Properties” dialogue, go to the “Details” tab and look for “Tags” in the “Description” section.
  • Click the space beside “Tags” to activate text and type the tag. If you want to add multiple tags, names with a semi-colon and click “Apply” then Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version width="360" height="507" src="https://img.webnots.com/2019/03/Add-Tag.png" alt="Add Tag to File">
Tagging Multiple Files

Option 2: Adding Tags in Windows Explorer “Details Pane”

  • To show the “Details Pane”, click the “View” menu and click the “Details Pane” option located at the left edge of the explorer toolbar.
Show Details
  • Select the files or multiple files that you want to tag and on the right-side panel, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version the tag(s) on the text box next to the “Tags” heading. The click the “Save” button at the bottom of the file details.
  • Note that if you are adding an existing tag, Windows gives you suggestion and you only need to check the box to add.
Tagging Files

Option 3: Adding Tags in Save Dialog

You can add tags to your file such as Word document in the save dialog.

  • Open the document, go to the “File” menu and click “Save” for a new document or “Save As” for existing documents.
Saving File
  • At the bottom of the “Save As”dialog window, click the space next to “Tags” and type the keywords of choice, then click the “Save” button.
Save Tagging

Related:How to protect your Windows 10 PC?

Effectively Using Tags in Windows 10

Now that you have learnt different ways of adding tags in Windows. You can follow one of the easy ways that works for you. After adding tags to your files and folders, you can use the tags to search and get the results quickly.

Using Tags to Search in Windows 10 File Explorer

  • Open the File Explorer by pressing “Win + E” keys.
  • Click on the search box and then go to the “Search Tools” in the menu bar.
  • Select “Other properties” to expand the options.
  • Click “Tags” to allow Windows to reference tags when looking for the file.
Search by Tags
  • Type the tag and wait for Windows to search for files associated with the tag.
  • For example, we can search for “Project 1” files, all files with work in progress, “WIP” or photos with flowering trees, “Flowering” and so on.
Tag Search Result

Using Tags to Group Related or Sort Files

  • To sort the file using the tags, go to the “View” menu, click the “Sort by” arrow and check the “Tags” option.
Sorting by Tags
  • Click the “Group by” arrow and choose “Tags” to categorize related files. You can click to expand the different groups.

Using Tags to Filter Files in the Same Directory

  • When working on a particular directory, you can filter the files using tags.
  • First, you need to add the “Tags” column by expanding the “Add columns” option in view tools and then check “Tags”.
Add Tag Column
  • Click the arrow beside the column header “Tags” and check the appropriate tags.
Filtering with Tags

Final Remarks

To enhance your file management efficiency, you can add tags (keywords) to your file to help you search and find a particular file in file explorer. You can add tags to single or multiple files and use them to organize files into their respective categories or filter files within a folder. The above guide teaches you how to add and use file tags in Windows 10, but it is important to note that Windows support tags in selected file types. However, you can find third-party software that enables tagging of other file types.

Tags: File ExplorerSearchTags

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Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Tagging Files With Windows 10

This quite lengthy article explains and discusses the built-in file tagging implementation of Microsoft Windows 10. I do have a strong background with PIM and tagging and this article is written from the human perspective when manually tagging user-generated files.

To my knowledge, Microsoft is currently not actively promoting this feature. Therefore, complaining on bad design decisions does not apply here as long as Microsoft does not understand this kind of tagging as something which was designed to be used by the general user. Because from my perspective, it obviously can't be meant to be used in practice. Unfortunately. Let's take a closer look why I came to this conclusion.

TL;DR: Microsoft Windows does provide NTFS features to tag arbitrary files. Some applications do also merge format-specific tags with these NTFS tags. Although there are quite nice retrieval functions for tags, it is very complicated to use this for general file management. Applied tags are easily lost so that in practice, users will refrain from using native Windows file tagging like this.

Table of contents:

  1. What Does Tagging Mean Here?
  2. A Well-Hidden Feature
  3. How to See and Assign Tags
  4. How to Make Use of Tags
  5. Playing Around With Tags
  6. Enabled File Types for Tagging
  7. How to Enable Tags for More File Types
  8. Relations Between Applications and Meta-Data
  9. History, Implementation Details, and Similar Implementations
  10. Windows 10 Tags Considered as Fragile
  11. Summary and Remarks

What Does Tagging Mean Here?

For this article, I am talking about non-collaborative local file-tagging. This describes the process of attaching one or more unique keywords to files stored on NTFS file systems by users who are able to access the file with granted write-permissions via the Windows File Explorer. "Keywords" and "tags" are used as synonyms here.

I could elaborate on tag and tag-system definitions for quite some time but let us stop here for the sake of brevity. It will be a long journey after all.

A Well-Hidden Feature

By default, the Windows UI does not expose anything at all that would help the users to recognize Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version file tagging possibility. So we do have a more or less full support for tagging files and yet Microsoft hides this quite well from the common eye. Probably for a good reason, which we are going to find out below.

Although I'm very interested in topics related to tagging this feature is that well hidden so that I was not aware of this feature myself until I read about it in a book in 2018. Support for tagging started as early as with Windows Vista.

How to See and Assign Tags

In order to see and edit file tags, you have to enable "View (Tab) → Details pane" in the File Explorer.

There is a second UI feature you might want to activate: the read-only Tags column is activated by choosing "Tags" in the context menu of the column bar:

When you go through different files, you will recognize that not all file types can be tagged by default. For example, the details pane for a simple text file does not show the "Tags: Add a tag" in contrast to any JPEG image file as shown in the screen-shots above.

Assigned tags are visible in the details pane as well as in the tags column:

Adding or modifying tags is possible in the Details pane but not in the tags column. You will recognize that Microsoft allows tags with spaces and special characters. Multiple tags are usually separated by semicolons which is probably the only standard character which is not allowed within tags.

The last place where File Explorer is showing you the assigned tags and also allows to edit them is within the Properties of a file:

As shown in the screenshots above, tags might be added/removed/modified at two places: either on the "Details pane" (on the right hand side of the File Explorer window) or within the file properties on its "Details" tab.

How to Make Use of Tags

Now that we have tagged some files, what possibilities are there to use this meta-data in daily life? First of all, there is navigation. For navigating through your files, you might prefer your File Explorer sorted alphabetically by file name:

With tags, you might also sort alphabetically by tags instead:

Since the order of files in the "sorted by tags"-view is depending on the order of tags within the files, I do not consider this a great improvement. However, what is really neat is when you consider the "Group by"-method. Be default, File Explorer is grouping by names:

You can change the grouping in the "View" tab of the File Explorer:

Having switched to "Group by Tags", you will notice that all files are arranged by their assigned tags:

Untagged files are listed in the "Unspecified" category at the bottom. The categories above correspond to the alphabetically sorted list of tags. Each file is listed once for each tag. So if a file like does have two different tags ("Dogs" and "House"), it is listed twice. One time in the category "Dogs" and one time in the category "House". If you select it in one category, this single file gets selected in all categories.

Complementary to file navigation, File Explorer has a search feature implemented. The following image shows the result when you do search for a tag "house" within the folder we've used above:

You will notice that all files are listed in the results that do feature the tag "house" or "House". So search as well as "Group by Tags" is case insensitive when it comes to tags. All other files, not having the "house" tag, are omitted.

When you search for multiple tags, just the files that do contain all of them are listed:

On the negative side, you can not search for keywords that only occur within tags. I would have expected a query language according to the widespread pattern like "tag:dog" which would look for the occurrence of "dog" but only within the tags and not the file name or the content.

So if you're searching for "dog", you will find files that contain the tag dog as well as files that do contain "dog" within their file name:

This File Explorer tag search is not a sub-string search: if you want to find files tagged with "mydog", you can not find them by searching for "dog". However, when you have tagged files with "my dog", you will find them in the search results for "dog" but not within search results for "dogs".

In summary: Searching for tags is:

  • case-insensitive,
  • non-sub-string,
  • whole-word and not whole-tag.

Playing Around With Tags

When you play around with different Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, you will find out that this feature is intended to be used case-insensitive. When you tag a file with "Dog" and "dog", the last one wins and the other gets ESET-NOD32-Antivirus-8-64-bit crack serial keygen.

When "Arrange by Tags" is used, the tag "Dog" as well as "dog" gets listed in the category "Dog". Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version

When you select multiple tagged files, the Details pane shows only the tags that can be found within all selected files. The other ones are not visualized. You may add additional tags which then gets added to all selected files:

You may remove all tags of one or a set of selected files with "Properties → Details → Remove .".

This page mentions a context menu function to export the meta-data of selected files to an file, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. Meta-data from an file could be applied to the files as well. I was not able to find this function in my tests.

Enabled File Types for Tagging

In the previous sections I mentioned briefly that only a sub-set of file types may be tagged by default. In my opinion, this is a very tough restriction if you want to use tags for organizing your files.

On a fresh Windows 10 installation, there are not even a hundred file types that may be tagged. When apps get installed like Microsoft Office or LibreOffice, meta-data handlers for additional file formats gets added and configured. On my business Windows 10 system approximately 180 extensions had associated meta-data handlers. After installing LibreOffice on a Windows 10 virtual machine, about 120 extensions were listed as tag-able, approximately thirty of them from LibreOffice alone. I noticed that LibreOffice does not create meta-data handlers for Microsoft formats such as or whereas handler for older formats are created: or.

It is important to know that not all meta-data handlers offer meta-data tagging by keywords. Only meta-data handlers that contain definitions for "System.Keywords" result in the ability to be tagged. Furthermore, not all meta-data handlers that contains keywords/tags offer them also in file properties.

I tried to come up with a minimum list of activated tagging via meta-data handlers. When downloading a fresh Windows 10 virtual machine like that one, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, you will find some tools pre-installed. In this case, these are many development tools. After manually installing DotNet, LibreOffice 5.4.4, paint.net 4.2.5, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, all extensions with enabled handlers for keywords/tags are:

.asf .cr2 .crw .dng .doc .dot .dvr-ms .erf .flac .jfif .jpe .jpeg .jpg .jxr .kdc .m1v .m2t .m2ts .m2v .m4a .m4b .m4p .m4v .mka .mkv .mod .mov .mp2 .mp2v .mp4 .mp4v .mp3 .mpeg .mpg .mpv2 .mrw .msi .msp .mts .nef .nrw .pef .raf .raw .rw2 .rwl .sr2 .srw .tif .tiff .tod .ts .tts .uvu .vob .wdp .weba .webm .wma .wmv

I did Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version mention all well-known LibreOffice formats that were also in the list.

As you can see, most of these activated file types do not reflect bug relevance for the average user. Selected extensions that do not have handlers or no handlers that provide tagging:

.avi .docx .exe .gif .lnk .mp3 .png .wav .css .csv .epub .gz .html .json .java .txt .wmf .xhtml .xlsx .zip

Therefore, there are many file types which may be used on any given Windows machine that can not be tagged by default.

How to Enable Tags for More File Types

After we have found out that it would be nice to have more file formats enabled for tagging, how are we able to enable meta-data handlers ourselves?

The answer lies within a project called FileMeta, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. You can download the latest release on their release page. Installing this tool Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version administration permissions. I totally recommend the documentation pages for learning about details on this topic in general.

After installing FileMeta, you will find multiple executables in its install directory: and.

Most things can also be done on the command line. For configuring the tagging functionality, we'll stick to the graphical for this article. After starting up the File Meta Association Manager you will see three main parts of the UI:

  1. Some workflows for manipulating on the left hand side,
  2. the File Extensions list with the handler associations and
  3. the meta-data related settings on the right hand side:

Extending the List of File Extensions

The list of the file extensions are read from the Windows registry, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. If you can not find a specific file extension in the File Meta Association Manager, no application has registered the file extension so far. If you do associate a file extension with an application ("Always open with ."), this does not create a registry entry. Therefore, associating an extension with an application is not sufficient that this extension gets listed in the File Meta Association Manager.

To add an extension not listed yet, you have to start the registry editor with administrator privileges, go to "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE" → "SOFTWARE" → "Classes" and choose "New → Key" from the context menu.

Then you can enter your new extension like, e.g., and confirm with the return key, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. After restarting the File Meta Association Manager you'll find the new extension in the list.

Pre-Defined Profiles

My File Meta Association Manager lists two pre-defined profiles: "Simple" and "OfficeDSOfile". The latter seems to be set up by LibreOffice. The "Simple" profile has a few properties set up for "Preview Panel", "Details tab in Properties" and "Info Tip": Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version

Custom Profiles

If you would like to set up a new custom profile, you have to know:

  • Full details → Description "System.Keywords": necessary to see and edit tags in the preferences → Details tab.
  • The Preview Panel → "System.Keywords": necessary to see and edit tags in the Details pane.

You can't have Details pane without preferences Details tab. Both settings enable the tags shown in the column bar.

Therefore, a minimal custom profile for tagging where you can see the tags in the Details tab looks like that:

Such a profile results in a File Explorer view like that, where you can edit tags in the preferences as well as in the Details tab:

Whenever you change meta-data handlers, you will probably going to restart the File Explorer via the "Restart Explorer" button of the File Meta Association Manager in order to apply changes.

After setting up a custom meta-data handler for file extensions, you can see them also in the command line tool :

c:\Program Files\File Metadata>FileMetaAssoc.exe -l .txt Simple File Meta Property Handler c:\Program Files\File Metadata>

Relations Between Applications and Meta-Data

As mentioned briefly before, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, some applications do create meta-data handlers for file extensions when being installed. For example, LibreOffice is creating handlers for their document formats as well as some formats from Microsoft such as or but not or.

Programs like LibreOffice Writer or Microsoft Word do provide meta-data within the preferences of an open document.

You are able to enter tags within the document properties:

These tags can now be seen in the file properties (Details tab) as well as in the tags column. Because of the missing "System.Keywords" in the profile for the "Preview Panel", the tags are not shown in the Details tab of the File Explorer:

Foxit PhantomPDF 11.0.1 Crack with Activation Key Download Latest 2022 is the File Meta Association Manager profile "LibreOffice property handler" as set up by LibreOffice:

It's interesting to see that the "LibreOffice property handler" is not visible TechSmith Snagit 2020.2.4 Crack FREE Download the File Meta Association Manager profiles. So I tried to overwrite the "LibreOffice property handler" with the "Simple" profile. To my surprise, this happened:

Yes, this makes sense after all. After confirming this dialogue, the File Meta Association Manager window was gone, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. I thought that this action was not successful and the app crashed. After restarting the application, I noticed the successfully merged profiles for the extension.

Unfortunately, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, in contrast to my expectations, there was no change: no tags visible in Preview page of File Explorer and tags in Details tab can not be changed, only viewed. So this was not a success after all: I still can not modify tags for LibreOffice Writer files outside of LibreOffice Writer file preferences although they can be seen in File Explorer.

So I started to create some non-native LibreOffice Writer documents: and. For files, there were no document property tags visible in File Explorer: not in Preview pane, not in tags column and not in the file properties.

Different story with the files though: Here, the document property tags are synchronized with the NTFS meta-data. Whenever a tag is added or changed in the file properties, the same change appears in the LibreOffice Writer document properties and vice versa. However, there are no tags/keywords visible in the Preview pane.

This tag synchronization mechanism has a minor issue: when you do not create a file from within LibreOffice Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version or Microsoft Word but with a text editor, there is no within-file meta-data preferences yet. This results in an error message when you want to tag a zero byte file in File Explorer:

When you do select "New → Excel Spreadsheet" in File Explorer with Microsoft Office installed, it does not create a zero byte file as with Word files using the same method. Instead, it fills the spreadsheet file with a seven kilobyte default content. This way, you won't get this error message for Excel files in this situation.

Related to this, you can read on the FileMeta FAQ for PDF files:

If I add the File Meta Property Handler for PDF files, will I see properties already in those files? No, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, unless you are using version 1.4 Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version are extending an existing property handler for PDF files. File Meta has vray download crack Archives capability otherwise for reading properties held within the PDF formatted part of the file. File Meta always writes properties in an NTFS-provided annex to the file. [.] The bad news is that File Meta before version 1.4 will not read properties held in the type-specific formatted part of a file, and no version of File Meta will update such properties.

To make this even more complicated, you have to know that Windows supports tags for every file type, internally. They will not be visible in the properties section of that file, but when you search for those tags, the file Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version in search results.

After all these experiences I can only sum up my experience with: it's very complicated. The end-user can not expect tags/keywords to be visible in the File Explorer. She is not able to know if document preference keywords are synchronized to the NTFS meta-data. If there are tags visible, they may not be able to be managed on the Preview pane or the file preferences. File Explorer search seems to find all keywords so far. However, you don't know that a specific file was found because of a Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version or anything else since this visualization is missing.

History, Implementation Details, and Similar Implementations

You can read about the history of this feature and some technical details on this page. Basically, NTFS stores the meta-data within an Alternate data streams (ADS). This is quite similar to how Apple stored meta-data in HFS+ and probably also within AFS. I was using the color labels of OS X up to Leopard. They ended up as file-system based meta-data as well.

You can read on this Wikipedia article:

In Apple's macOS, the operating system has allowed users to assign multiple arbitrary tags as extended file attributes to any file or folder ever since OS X 10.9 was released in 2013, and before that time the open-source OpenMeta standard provided similar tagging functionality in macOS.

Windows 10 Tags Considered as Fragile

I do think that the average reader does agree that using tags with this Windows 10 feature is a drag from the user experience point of view already. I do have sad news: this now even gets worse.

Since meta-data are stored in NTFS data streams, you are losing all of the tags when files get moved to someplace where there are no NTFS data streams or when applications generating files do not respect them properly. As a consequence, there are many possibilities where meta-data gets lost. Here is a list of the most obvious ones.

  1. Losing meta-data when copying to a thumb drive
    • Copying a tagged file to a drive that is not formatted with NTFS results in a silent loss of the meta-data, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. Thumb drives usually are formatted with FAT32.
  2. Losing meta-data when sending them via email
    • When you attach a tagged file to an email, the meta-data does not get attached as well.
  3. Losing meta-data because of applications handling temporary files
    • When you open a file in too many Windows applications, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, new modifications by the user get written to a temporary file. On saving the changes to the file, this temporary file then gets renamed to the original file name, overwriting the previous file as well as the meta-data. This is a very mean behavior since users would never expect to lose meta-data just by saving a file.
  4. Losing meta-data when doing backup
    • When you back up your data, the backup application needs to save and restore meta-data within ADS properly. I did not investigate this issue but my gut feelings are that only a fraction of the tools on the market do consider ADS meta-data and handle them accordingly.

Summary and Remarks

After being enthusiastic when I found out that Microsoft provides a native file tagging ecosystem with Windows, I had to take a closer look. This enthusiasm was replaced by a disillusion. Everything related to file tagging is hidden from the common user by default. Enabling it results in manual labor not only for the UI but also for each and every file extension separately. Although there are some nice retrieval features for navigation, search does not differ between keywords in tags and keywords anywhere else. It is not entirely clear to me how file-format-specific tags interact with the NTFS tags. Finally, when you did invest some time for tagging files, there is a high chance of losing all this meta-data sometimes without even realizing it.

If Microsoft would act in a way that somebody would be thinking that this tagging feature is ready for production, it would qualify for my bad design decisions series. For me personally, I'd Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version invest anything in using this feature mainly because of the many ways of losing meta-data without noticing. My current approach for tagging is described on this article. It's an OS-independent and app-independent method with very nice features like TagTrees you can not find elsewhere.

If you DiskDigger 1.41.61.3067 Crack Archives like to get an overview on other non-file-system-based tagging solutions, you can read the bachelor thesis "Marktübersicht von Tagging-Werkzeugen und Vergleich mit tagstore" which can be downloaded at the tagstore page. It's in German language and it reflects the situation of the year 2013.

Before writing this article I needed to implement a necessary feature for my blogging system beforehand. With this, you are now able to click on the screenshot previews to see them with their original size. So this article was in my personal pipe-line for over a year. As a consequence, early findings and screen shots from 2018 are based on whereas the most current ones from 2019 are based onTag Archives: Windows 10 latest version.

Congratulations for following this very long blog article until its end. I hope I could teach you something on Windows 10 functions and help you decide on its usefulness for your situation. Drop Microsoft Office Professional 2010 Product Key Plus Cracked 2021 a line Ableton Live Patch Archives - Cracked Software Links the comments below when you do have some questions or remarks.

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How to Tag Files in Windows 10

What to Know

  • Right-click the file and select Properties. On the Details tab, select Tags to add your tags, separating each one with a semicolon.
  • Alternatively, open File Explorer and select View > Details Pane on the ribbon. Select the file, then select Add a tag in the Details pane.
  • To search for tagged files in the File Explorer, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, enter tag: followed by your keyword in the search bar to the right of the window.

If you have tons of files stored in Windows, you know how hard it can be to find the right file when you need it. Fortunately, you can tag supported files in Windows 10 with one or more relevant keywords to make it simple to find them using Windows File Search.

Not all files stored in Windows can be tagged. Tagging is only supported on images, documents, and videos. And, in some cases, even some supported file types may not allow tagging.

How to Add Tags to a File in Windows 10

Although it's not intuitive to tag files in Windows 10, it's also not difficult once you've walked through it a few times. There are two ways to find and use the file tagging capabilities in Windows 10: from the Properties Window and from a file's Details Pane.

How to Tag Files in the Properties Window

By default, the Properties Window is hidden in Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version 10, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. To find the Properties Window and tag your files, use these steps: Superantispyware Professional key 2021 v8.0.1046 With Full Crack Open File Explorer.

  • Navigate to the file you want to tag and right-click it.

  • In the menu that appears, select Properties.

  • Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version the Properties window, select the Details tab.

  • On the Details tab, double-click the Tags line to add one or more tags, separating each one with a semicolon.

  • Press Enter when you've finished adding tags to apply them to the file.

  • Click Apply to save your changes.

  • Click OK to close the Properties window.

  • You can select multiple files to tag them all at one time.

    How to Tag Files in the Details Pane

    By default, the Details Pane is also hidden in Windows 10. To access Planet Zoo ActivationKey.txt crack serial keygen take just a few clicks:

    1. Open File Explorer.

    2. Navigate to and select the file you want to tag.

    3. On the Ribbon, select the View tab.

    4. From the View Ribbon, select the Details Pane.

    5. In the Details Pane, click Add a tag and type the tags you want to assign to the file. Remember to separate tags with a semicolon.

    6. When you're done, press Enter or click Save to assign the tags.

    You can select multiple files to assign the same tags to all of them, all at one time.

    Once you have tagged your files, moving them to another computer or an external hard drive that uses a different file system than the one on which the files were tagged could cause the assigned tags to be erased.

    Search for Tagged Files in Windows 10

    Once you've added tags to your files, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version them becomes easier (and faster) because you can use a specific search string to find the tags you've created. To search for tagged files, in the File Explorer, use the search bar to the right of the window and use this search string:

    tag: your keyword

    Replace your keyword with the name of the tag you're trying to find. The search results should return only files that contain the specified tags.

    Thanks for letting us know!

    Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
    OverviewSystem RequirementsRelated

    Description

    Are you tired with organizing file in the traditional folder structure? Is your folder structure is so complex difficult to find files? Looking for a simple and fun way to organize files? Then Tag Explorer is the ultimate solution for you. Tag Explorer is a simple but yet powerful file management software. It goes beyond traditional file management tools like windows explorer and the folder system. Simply assign any number of tags to files and browse files by their tags. Unlike traditional folder, structure tags don't have any hierarchy and you can browse file by any order you want.

    What's new in this version

    Add Content view Add open in File Explorer feature

    Features

    • A file can have any number of Tags.
    • Group Tags to more organize.
    • Search files by multiple tags.
    • Child folders inherit tags from parent folder.

    System Requirements

    OSWindows 10 version 10240.0 or higher, Windows 8.1
    ArchitectureARM, x64, x86
    KeyboardIntegrated Keyboard
    MouseIntegrated Mouse
    OSWindows 10 version 10240.0 or higher, Windows 8.1
    ArchitectureARM, x64, x86
    KeyboardNot specified
    MouseNot specified
    Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

    How to use the Windows Tags property to manage Office files

    picstudioistock-686632992.jpg

    Sometimes you don't know you need a feature until you discover it and put it to use for a bit. Then you wonder how you ever got your work done without it! That's how you might feel about Windows Tags. Yes, it's a Windows feature, but you can use Tags to manage Office files--and other file types as well. Whether you work alone or share files via a server or even OneDrive for Business, you can benefit from Tags. In this article, I'll show you how to add Tags to Office and non-Office files and how to search using those Tags.

    I'm working with Office 2016 (desktop) on a Windows 10 64-bit system. The Windows Tags property is available in older versions, back to Windows Vista. In Office, they've been available since at least Office 2007 (but maybe longer). There's no downloadable demonstration file. You won't need one, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version.

    SEE: Windows 10 power tips: Secret shortcuts to your favorite settings (Tech Pro Research)

    What are Tags?

    Don't confuse Office Smart Tags and Windows Tags; they aren't the same thing. Windows Tags are keywords used for organizing (searching) files. How you use them will depend on your needs, but anytime you're working with bulk files or sharing Audacity 2.3.1 Archives for the same purpose, Tags can help. Don't limit their use to simply describing the file's contents, either. You can use Tags to describe how you use the file. For instance, you might use terms such as complete and not complete to describe status. Or you might use the term upload to group files you need to upload to an external service such as OneDrive.

    Add a tag to an Office file

    Tags are a Windows file property, but you can add them when saving an Office file. During the save process, you'll see an Options link. It's quite possible that you've never explored this link before. Let's take a look:

    1. With any Office file open, click the File tab and choose Save As in the left pane.
    2. Below the Filename and Location controls, click the More Options link (Figure A).
    3. In the bottom-right corner of the resulting dialog, look for the Tags control (Figure B).
    4. Click the Add A Tag Link and supply a keyword (Figure C). To add more than one, separate the keywords with a semicolon. Once you add a Tags keyword, Office will display it in an AutoComplete list when you tag subsequent files, making it easier to use Tags consistently, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version.
    5. Click Save and continue as you normally would.

    Figure A

    wordtagsa.jpg
    Click the More Options link.

    Figure B

    wordtagsb.jpg
    Click the Tags control and start entering keywords.

    Figure C

    wordtagsc.jpg
    Separate keywords with a semicolon.

    You can add Tags to all your Office files this way. Although I showed you only one, you might have several files that warrant a plant sale or 2018 keyword. Following our example, you have a plant list in Excel, but you might also have a vendor contract in Word and several graphic files you're using in different publicity venues.

    SEE: Microsoft Power BI: Getting started with data visualization (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

    Searching

    Now let's use File Explorer to find all your plant sale files. You could run a quick search on your local drive using any number of search strings: plant list, contract, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, and so on. If you use this route, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, you know that a search can take a while and it often turns up a lot of files you're not looking for. As you can see in Figure D, what you might expect to be a simple search for your Word contract is anything but. A similar search on 2018 could return similar or even worse results, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version.

    Figure D

    wordtagsd.jpg
    A search on contract returns a lot of files.

    Okay, I confess: The above search is unnecessarily complicated--I did that on purpose. If you see a lot of files you can't identify, check the Advanced Options dropdown and make sure System Files is unchecked (unless you're looking for system files). Doing so will improve most search tasks, with or without Tags.

    However, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, thanks to Tags, you don't have to second guess, remember every related file you've generated or updated, or wade through busy search results. Even if the search includes system files (as above), you won't see a lot of unexpected files. You'll see only the files you've tagged accordingly.

    To pinpoint just the files you want to see related to your plant sale, open File Explorer and click This PC (or a folder, a server drive, or OneDrive). Enter a search string in the following form:

    Tags: search string

    As you can see in Figure E, the search on Tags: plant sale matches only two files: the plant list in Excel and the vendor contract in Word. If you know where the files are, you can run a quicker search by selecting that folder before executing the search. If you're like me, some folders contain a lot of files and a Tags search is often easier and quicker than a normal alphabetical list.

    Figure E

    wordtagse.jpg
    Using the plant sale Tags keyword reduces the number of files returned.

    Not all formats are equal

    Not all software allows you to add Tags when saving a file, but that's not a problem. You can use File Explorer to add Tags:

    1. Open File Explorer and select the file you want to tag.
    2. On the View tab, click Details in the Panes group to open the Details pane.
    3. Enter the appropriate Tags (Figure F).
    4. Click Save, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version.

    Figure F

    wordtagsf.jpg
    Enter your Tags.

    Now when you run the same search, Tags: plant sale, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, File Explorer returns the first two files and the .jpg, as shown in Figure G.

    Figure G

    wordtagsg.jpg
    This time, Uninstall Tool v3.0.1.Build 5227 crack serial keygen search found three tagged files.

    Using File Explorer, you can sort and group a folder's contents using Tags. Simply click the View tab and choose Tags from the Sort By or Group By dropdown. Or right-click the background and choose Tags from the Sort By or Group By options. In addition, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, you can filter for Tags. As Figure H shows, you can filter for specific Tags if you're using the Details view. This is great when you know all your files are in the same folder.

    Figure H

    wordtagsh.jpg
    You can also filter by Tags.

    Using File Explorer, you can add Tags to several files at the same time. Hold down the Ctrl key while selecting files to create a multi-file selection. Then, add Tags as you normally would. If you add a file to the selection that doesn't allow tagging, the Tags control won't be accessible for any of the files, so be careful.

    SEE: Four ways to specify dates using Excel data validation (TechRepublic)

    Only as good.

    Tags, or keywords, are only as good as the people adding them. If you work alone, this is easy. If you're trying to corral files for an organization, it's much harder. Everyone may not be on the same page, so searches will be incomplete at best. That might be one reason they're not more popular. Even using File Explorer, you can't add Tags to every file type. For instance, you can't tag a .txt file.

    In addition, you can use any of the properties via the Details pane in the same way. For instance, for Content status, you might enter Incomplete and Complete. To search, you'd use the string Contentstatus: Complete. You can also use wildcards. To see all tagged files, you'd enter Tags: -[]. That means that where Tags isn't null. As you can see, there's a lot to explore!

    Microsoft Weekly Newsletter

    Be your company's Microsoft insider by reading these Windows and Office tips, tricks, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, and cheat sheets. Delivered Mondays and Wednesdays

    Sign up today

    Send me your question about Office

    I answer readers' questions when I can, but there's no guarantee. Don't send files unless requested; initial requests for help that arrive with attached files will be deleted unread. You can send screenshots of your data to help clarify your question. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise when helping readers, nor do I ask for a fee from readers I help. You can contact me at [email protected]

    Also read.

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    files-community / Files Public

    Build StatusDiscord

    Welcome to the Files repository

    Files

    What is Files?

    Files is a file manager for Windows with a powerful yet intuitive design. It has features like multiple tabs, panes, columns, shell extensions in the context menu and tags.

    Where to get Files

    Vision for Files

    Our vision for Files is to be fully functional while keeping it simple and easy to use. Whether it's implementing new features, or pushing the boundaries of the platform, Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version, your input will help shape the future of Files.

    Why should I contribute?

    We can confidently assert Files is the platform's best file explorer project to bring your innovations to. We focus heavily on extensibility and code modularity and have no plans to stop doing Tag Archives: Windows 10 latest version. When you contribute to this project, you're helping everyone by fixing reported bugs, adding new features, or correcting existing behavior. These changes are quickly included in the final product for all users to benefit from.

    We welcome discussions and contributions to our repository, however to help maintain a healthy community, please read our code of conduct.

    Building Files source

    • Install Visual Studio 2019 and the UWP Development Kit.
    • Clone the repository and open the in VS.
    • Visual Studio will install all missing dependencies.
    • Run the project.

    View our Contributing guidelines

    FAQ

    Have any questions? Check out our documentation site!

    Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

    3 comments

    1. Could you do a video on how to get your curls back from heat damage. I have super curly hair but i didnt apriciate it so here i am.

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