Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version

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Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version

File Explorer, previously known as Windows Explorer, is a file manager application that is A "dark mode" has been added to File Explorer in Windows 10, version 1809. Occasionally, you may want to perform an advanced search to find large files somewhere on your computer. Choose a Windows version to get started. Windows 10. Here are the Windows files and folders that can be safely deleted to a Windows upgrade (even just to the latest version of Windows 10).

Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version - will

tag editor tab

AudioShell 2 is a freeware Windows Explorer shell extension which allows you to view and edit ID3 meta-data tags directly in Windows Vista/7/8 Explorer. It supports all files and tags standards supported by Tag&Rename - music tag editor. AudioShell adds ID3 tag editor and files rename tools into Windows system music files pop-up menu. AudioShell property shell handler add detailed music tags information into Windows Explorer columns and Preview pane, thumbnail handler add thumbnails with album art into Explorer. Full Unicode and 64 bit support.

System requirements: AudioShell is designed for Windows Vista/7/8/8.1 both 32 and 64 bit systems.

Old AudioShell version for Windows XP 32 bit can be found here.

Supported files and tags formats:

  • mp3 (all ID3 tag versions)
  • Windows Media (wma, asf and wmv files)
  • Apple iTunes aac (m4a, m4p, m4r and m4b) and mp4 and aiff files
  • ogg, flac, opus, speex (vorbis comment tags)
  • mpc, mp+, monkey’s audio, wav pack, optim frog, true audio - APE tags, APEv2 tags
  • wav - ID3v2.3 tag in 'id3 ' RIFF chunk and LIST INFO chunk
  • dsf (DSD/Direct-Stream Digital) - ID3v2.3 tag

>> Download Now

New in this version:

  • fixed bug in ID3v2.4 Unicode tags support

>> Download Now

New in 2.3.5 version:

  • improved ID3v2 support
  • improved mp4 support
  • improved aiff support
  • added support for PCM float uncompressed wav files properties

New in 2.3.4 version:

  • added support for Xtra atom in mp4 files (this atom used by Windows Explorer and Windows Media Player)
  • minor fixes

New in 2.3.3 version:

  • fixed bug in mp4 files support on 64bit systems

New in 2.3.2 version:

  • fixed bug in ID3v2 multiple cover arts in tag support
  • minor changes in WAV tagging
  • minor fixes

New in 2.3.1 version:

  • fixed bug in ID3v2 tag removing from mp3 files

New in 2.3 version:

  • added Opus files support
  • added "Retry" button to tag saving error message, so it is now possible to retry tag saving if file is locked by another application
  • fixed bug in flac support when flac file is not reduced even with very big padding
  • minor fixes

New in version 2.2:

  • added check for updates function
  • added support for DSD256
  • fixed bug in big wav files support
  • fixed bug in mp4 files support
  • minor fixes and improvements

New in version 2.1:

  • added support for TRACKTOTAL and DISCTOTAL tag frames in Vorbis Comments (ogg/flac) tags
  • fixed Comments column support in Windows Explorer

New in version: 2.0

  • added multi files tag editor
  • if file have only ID3v1 tag, AudioShell will show it data in tag editor window
  • now file renaming work for files with only ID3v1 tag
  • minor fixes

New in version 2.0 beta 2:

  • AudioShell now show ID3v1 tag information if mp3 file don't have ID3v2 tag
  • added support for .M4R files extension
  • improved mp4 support
  • improved wav support
  • improved dsf support
  • improved aiff support
  • minor improvements and fixes

New in version 2.0 beta 1:

  • added writing support to AudioShell properties handler - now tag fields can be edited directly in Windows Explorer
  • minor improvements

Major new features in version 2.0:

  • Tag Editor with most tag frames support
  • File rename tool
  • Windows shell properties handler
  • Windows shell thumbnails handler
  • Windows Vista/7/8 support
  • 64 bit support

Window Explorer show mp3 files thumbnail and properties using AudioShell 2 shell handlers:

Clik for full size view

 

AudioShell 2 - tag editor:

Clik for full size view

 

AudioShell 2 - multi files tag editor:

Clik for full size view

 

AudioShell 2 - renaming files:

Clik for full size view

 

AudioShell 2 - options:

Clik for full size view

 

>> Download Now

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Windows 10 has a powerful in-built search function, which allows you to locate a specific file in a matter of seconds. The Cortana allows you to find anything more quickly using smart filters such as file type and storage location. Alternatively, you can also use the File Explorer to know the name and/or the type of the file you are looking for.

This means that without it can be challenging to find a specific file without its correct name, especially when you are handling thousands of files. Fortunately, you can add tags to your files and improve the search speed in Windows 10. Furthermore, tags enable you to organize your files into categories without having to create several folders or renaming the files. This post will guide you on how to add tags and use them to search for files.

What are Tags in Windows 10?

Tags are simply keywords (metadata) that forms part of the properties of a file(s). You can use tags to categorize your files into projects, status or any other classifications. For instance, you can label your photos according to locations or events, mark your unfinished project documents and so on, simplifying file management in file explorer. You can use these tags to group related files or for a quicker search.

How to Add Tags in Windows 10?

Windows 10 supports tags for various types of files such as Microsoft Office files, images, videos and audios among others. There are three simple methods for adding tags:

Option 1: Adding Tags from “Properties” Dialog

  • Open the directory/folder containing the files, click your file of interest and select “Properties” from the context menu.
  • On the “Properties” dialogue, go to the “Details” tab and look for “Tags” in the “Description” section.
  • Click the space beside “Tags” to activate text and type the tag. If you want to add multiple tags, names with a semi-colon and click “Apply” then “Ok”.
Add Tag to File
  • You can also add tags to multiple files by selecting the files and then repeat steps 1-3 above and then click the “Ok” button.
Tagging Multiple Files

Option 2: Adding Tags in Windows Explorer “Details Pane”

  • To show the “Details Pane”, click the “View” menu and click the “Details Pane” option located at the left edge of the explorer toolbar.
Show Details
  • Select the files or multiple files that you want to tag and on the right-side panel, add the tag(s) on the text box next to the “Tags” heading. The click the “Save” button at the bottom of the file details.
  • Note that if you are adding an existing tag, Windows gives you suggestion and you only need to check the box to add.
Tagging Files

Option 3: Adding Tags in Save Dialog

You can add tags to your file such as Word document in the save dialog.

  • Open the document, go to the “File” menu and click “Save” for a new document or “Save As” for existing documents.
Saving File
  • At the bottom of the “Save As”dialog window, click the space next to “Tags” and type the keywords of choice, then click the “Save” button.
Save Tagging

Related:How to protect your Windows 10 PC?

Effectively Using Tags in Windows 10

Now that you have learnt different ways of adding tags in Windows. You can follow one of the easy ways that works for you. After adding tags to your files and folders, you can use the tags to search and get the results quickly.

Using Tags to Search in Windows 10 File Explorer

  • Open the File Explorer by pressing “Win + E” keys.
  • Click on the search box and then go to the “Search Tools” in the menu bar.
  • Select “Other properties” to expand the options.
  • Click “Tags” to allow Windows to reference tags when looking for the file.
Search by Tags
  • Type the tag and wait for Windows to search for files associated with the tag.
  • For example, we can search for “Project 1” files, all files with work in progress, “WIP” or photos with flowering trees, “Flowering” and so on.
Tag Search Result

Using Tags to Group Related or Sort Files

  • To sort the file using the tags, go to the “View” menu, click the “Sort by” arrow and check the “Tags” option.
Sorting by Tags
  • Click the “Group by” arrow and choose “Tags” to categorize related files. You can click to expand the different groups.

Using Tags to Filter Files in the Same Directory

  • When working on a particular directory, you can filter the files using tags.
  • First, you need to add the “Tags” column by expanding the “Add columns” option in view tools and then check “Tags”.
Add Tag Column
  • Click the arrow beside the column header “Tags” and check the appropriate tags.
Filtering with Tags

Final Remarks

To enhance your file management efficiency, you can add tags (keywords) to your file to help you search and find a particular file in file explorer. You can add tags to single or multiple files and use them to organize files into their respective categories or filter files within a folder. The above guide teaches you how to add and use file tags in Windows 10, but it is important to note that Windows support tags in selected file types. However, you can find third-party software that enables tagging of other file types.

Tags: File ExplorerSearchTags

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The 17 Best Free Search Tools for Windows 10

Have you ever searched for a program, file, or folder only to discover that the system search takes longer to find results than it does just to find them manually yourself? I'd imagine most Windows users face this dilemma.

While there have always been some neat Windows Search tips and tricks, it has never been on par with the search features of Mac or Linux. Although Windows 10 did lessen the gap in many ways, it's still slow and imperfect. In fact, you may be better off switching to one of these free Windows third-party search tools instead.

1. Everything

Everything is consistently lauded as one of the fastest search tools for Windows. Using it is as simple as it gets: install it, open the program, and give it a bit to index your entire system (It can index a fresh Windows install in under a minute).

Once that's done, all you have to do is type anything into the text field, and you will get instantaneous results as you type. And as long as you allow Everything to sit in the background and monitor system changes, it will always be instantaneous.

Best of all, it's lightweight and takes up less than 5MB RAM and 1MB disk space. This is the absolute best tool to use for old and slow computers.

2. Listary

Of all the software on this list, Listary is probably the most unique. Not only is it extremely minimal in design, but it stays completely out of your way until you need it. When you want to search, just start typing. It's as easy as that.

And as you type, Listary will show a list of all files on your system that match the query in real-time. Listary can also execute commands like Open Folder and Copy Folder Path. You can even use Listary to quickly hop into a different folder just by typing that folder's name.

Some of its best features require Listary Pro, which is $20. But even with Listary Free, you get a lot of power and flexibility, which is one of the many reasons it makes it on to this list of the best Windows File Explorer extensions for file management.

3. grepWin

If you're someone who likes to have a more hands-on approach with your PC, then grepWin will be one of the most useful tools you'll have at your disposal. With it, you can search through any directory tree, and it will find files by matching contents with your search query (regular expressions are supported).

If you've ever used Linux, it's basically the grep command (one of the essential Linux commands to know), but designed for Windows and comes with a nifty interface. So the next time you need to search for a specific line of code or a specific line of documentation, this will cut your search time by orders of magnitude.

4. AstroGrep

AstroGrep is a great alternative to grepWin if the latter doesn't fit your fancy. It does the same thing—finds files that match your search query by content rather than file name—but is slightly less advanced and easier to use.

You can designate which file types to search, view file contents within AstroGrep itself, and save or print results for later. Potential future features include searching through PDFs, MP3s, ZIPs, RARs, and more.

AstroGrep has been around since 2006 and continues to receive regular updates.

5. SearchMyFiles

SearchMyFiles may seem helplessly primitive at first glance, but it's deceptively flexible. Once you get over the slight learning curve, you'll be able to put together complex search queries using filters and wildcards.

For example, search all files created in the last 15 minutes, between 300 and 600 bytes in size, and containing the word error. The application is lightweight and portable (no installation required), so you can carry it around on a USB stick. NirSoft also maintains hundreds of other useful utilities that are all clean, portable, and available free of charge.

6. Exselo Desktop

Exselo Desktop isn't as well-known as other free Windows 10 search tool options, which is a shame because it's actually excellent. It supports powerful search queries, has a simple interface, securely shares data, and even integrates with Outlook.

Not only can it search local drives, but Exselo can also comb through network and cloud stores. And best of all, the Free edition is feature complete. The only difference between Free and Enterprise is support for multiple users.

7. Duplicate & Same Files Searcher

Duplicate & Same Files Searcher is a tiny portable program—around 1MB in size—that finds all files that are identical by content (not by file name). As such, the scanning process can be a bit slow, but you can filter and set parameters to speed things up.

And not only can the program delete said duplicates, but it can replace them with hard links that are basically shortcuts to one single file, thus saving you space without breaking anything in the meanwhile.

Can you guess how much of your hard drive space is wasted by duplicate files? The answer might surprise you. Duplicate files are more common than we tend to think, and if those duplicates are image, audio, or video files, they can take up a lot of unnecessary space.

Related: How to Wipe Out my Hard Drive in Windows?

8. Registry Finder

Registry Finder is a free tool that makes registry navigation easy. It can also search keys according to when they were last modified, meaning this tool comes in handy when you want to see all recent changes that were made (e.g., for troubleshooting).

Despite the improved search features in Windows 10, the registry is still a bit crude and could use a lot of love. Whether you want to fix errors in the registry or make a few tweaks for usability, the process of finding keys can be slow and tedious—and that's why Registry Finder really shines.

9. UltraSearch

UltraSearch is a creation of JAM Software. They are also the creators of the popular hard drive space recovery program, TreeSize. UltraSearch offers essential search features plus a few extras, all while keeping it simple and fast.

It works by directly searching the Master File Table (MFT). Within the search window, all important file information is displayed. It also displays all of your computer's partitions and their total size and free space. Additional options include showing folders and/or files in a search, exclude filters, and printing the search results.

10. FileSearchEX

If you prefer the style of search from Windows XP, FileSearchEX is the program for you. Not only is the search interface familiar and comfortable, the app itself is portable and uses minimal system resources.

However, there is one drawback: the free version is a trial—not in the sense that the program will expire and become unusable, but the search window will time out. Open the window, complete your search, then close it. If you do this promptly, you should be fine.

Overall the search performance is OK. It isn't nearly as fast as the other programs we tested, but we still noticed it was quicker than the default Windows Search and remains a good alternative.

11. Launchy

Launchy is a nifty app that's meant to replace the Start Menu, the Taskbar, the File Explorer, and desktop shortcuts. If you've ever used a Mac, then it's a bit like Spotlight. Launchy indexes your entire system, then lets you launch files, apps, folders, and bookmarks with just a few keystrokes.

Most people think Launchy can only launch apps, but it can search files and folders if you enable the setting. Open Launchy with the Alt + Space shortcut, click the gear icon at the top right, go to the Catalog tab, find File Types in the right panel, then click "+" to add file types and directories that you want to include in the search.

12. Wise JetSearch 

Wise JetSearch is a free search tool for Windows 10. It is capable of searching all types of important files such as videos, music, images, and texts from the local drives and the removable drives.

Wise JetSearch can search all the hard drives and partitions, be they removable disks or secondary disk. It supports a variety of drive formats such as NTFS, FAT, and exFAT. Features like Quick Search and Preview Pane make using a Wise JetSearch a suitable alternative to the default Windows Search tool.

13. FileSeek

If you are a Windows power user looking for more control of your searches, then FileSeek is your best bet. Through its Advance Querying feature, you can use regular expressions to go specific in your search commands.

Then there's the feature of Tabbed Interface. You know how you have to wait for a search to get completed before you can look up something else on Windows? With FileSeek, you won't have to wait like that anymore. Thanks to Tabbed Interface, you can look up multiple files in a single go.

You can also filter the search results by date (creation date, modification date, etc.) and size. There's also a feature to copy the search result to a clipboard, and the ability to export them in formats like CSV and HTML.

These and many more such features make FileSeek an attractive choice for those of you who spend a lot of time using Windows 10. Also, you receive a trial version of the Pro version after installation, which switches back to the free version after a short period.

14. Agent Ransack

Agent Ransack is a free Windows search tool available for both personal and commercial use. We like this app because it gives immediate results without you having to open the files and then look up the right information.

You can also share the search results with others through the printing, exporting, and reporting features that come with this tool. Agent Ransack is also available as a free commercial Windows search tool. For commercial purpose, the creators have branded it as FileLocator Lite, although, it's essentially the same tool by the same company.

15. DocFetcher

Are you an open-source aficionado? Then you'll probably like DocFetcher. It's a free open-source desktop search application that can help you search through heaps of files on your computer with blazing fast speed.

"You can think of it as Google for your local files. The application runs on Windows, Linux and OS X, and is made available under the Eclipse Public License," writes DocFetcher on their homepage.

It supports the search of numerous types of files such as PST, HTML, RTF, ODT, MP3, JPEG, plain texts, .zip, and much more. With support for both 32- and 64-bit comes the pro-privacy policy of DocFetcher, which can be verified from their publicly accessible source code.

In times like ours, where privacy has become a joke, products like DocFetcher offer a breath of fresh air.

Related: Privacy vs. Security vs. Anonymity: What's the Difference?

16. Glarysoft Quick Search

It's a free PC search utility to help you find your files in a fast and efficient manner. Packed with a minimalist interface, the tool offers a search filter, real-time display panel, and a search box.

The software also offers a pro version that comes with added features, but the free version will do the job for most use cases. Apart from giving you relevant results, it will also notify you about junk files that you haven't used and probably don't even need.

17. SSuite Desktop Search

Apart from its clutter-free and smooth search abilities, SSuite Desktop Search tool offers a different but fledgling approach to software and its development: green software.

To put it briefly, green software is a type of software designed to be environmentally sustainable over a period of time.

The SSuite Desktop Search is designed to run on native Windows operating systems using the Win32 API structure, as opposed to other software products that run on Java or .NET. As a result, the latter products have higher memory requirements, resulting in a comparatively higher electrical consumption.

Also, note that when you install the free desktop search app, you'll get a .zip file. To run it, you'll first have to extract it locally on your PC. After that you'll be good to use the app.

Related: What Is Greenwashing and How Does It Affect Your Tech?

What's Your Preferred Free Windows Search Tool?

For better and faster search results, go ahead and pick one of the above tools. The built-in Windows 10 search is getting better, but there's still a long way to go before you can rely solely on it.

There might be many things that annoy and frustrate you in Windows 10, but the user base is so large that you'll always be able to find a third-party software that improves upon Microsoft's shortcomings. These nifty Windows search utilities are proof of that!

The 7 Best Free Alternatives to Fences for Windows Desktop Management

Is your Windows desktop messy? Here are free desktop management apps that can help you organize your virtual clutter.

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About The Author
Shaant Minhas (72 Articles Published)

Shaant is a Staff Writer at MUO. A graduate in Computer Applications, he uses his passion for writing to explain complex stuff in plain English. When not researching or writing, he can be found enjoying a good book, running, or hanging out with friends.

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Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
OverviewSystem RequirementsRelated

Description

Are you tired with organizing file in the traditional folder structure? Is your folder structure is so complex difficult to find files? Looking for a simple and fun way to organize files? Then Tag Explorer is the ultimate solution for you. Tag Explorer is a simple but yet powerful file management software. It goes beyond traditional file management tools like windows explorer and the folder system. Simply assign any number of tags to files and browse files by their tags. Unlike traditional folder, structure tags don't have any hierarchy and you can browse file by any order you want.

What's new in this version

Add Content view Add open in File Explorer feature

Features

  • A file can have any number of Tags.
  • Group Tags to more organize.
  • Search files by multiple tags.
  • Child folders inherit tags from parent folder.

System Requirements

OSWindows 10 version 10240.0 or higher, Windows 8.1
ArchitectureARM, x64, x86
KeyboardIntegrated Keyboard
MouseIntegrated Mouse
OSWindows 10 version 10240.0 or higher, Windows 8.1
ArchitectureARM, x64, x86
KeyboardNot specified
MouseNot specified
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Tagging Files With Windows 10

This quite lengthy article explains and discusses the built-in file tagging implementation of Microsoft Windows 10. I do have a strong background with PIM and tagging and this article is written from the human perspective when manually tagging user-generated files.

To my knowledge, Microsoft is currently not actively promoting this feature. Therefore, complaining on bad design decisions does not apply here as long as Microsoft does not understand this kind of tagging as something which was designed to be used by the general user. Because from my perspective, it obviously can't be meant to be used in practice. Unfortunately. Let's take a closer look why I came to this conclusion.

TL;DR: Microsoft Windows does provide NTFS features to tag arbitrary files. Some applications do also merge format-specific tags with these NTFS tags. Although there are quite nice retrieval functions for tags, it is very complicated to use this for general file management. Applied tags are easily lost so that in practice, users will refrain from using native Windows file tagging like this.

Table of contents:

  1. What Does Tagging Mean Here?
  2. A Well-Hidden Feature
  3. How to See and Assign Tags
  4. How to Make Use of Tags
  5. Playing Around With Tags
  6. Enabled File Types for Tagging
  7. How to Enable Tags for More File Types
  8. Relations Between Applications and Meta-Data
  9. History, Implementation Details, and Similar Implementations
  10. Windows 10 Tags Considered as Fragile
  11. Summary and Remarks

What Does Tagging Mean Here?

For this article, I am talking about non-collaborative local file-tagging. This describes the process of attaching one or more unique keywords to files stored on NTFS file systems by users who are able to access the file with granted write-permissions via the Windows File Explorer. "Keywords" and "tags" are used as synonyms here.

I could elaborate on tag and tag-system definitions for quite some time but let us stop here for the sake of brevity. It will be a long journey after all.

A Well-Hidden Feature

By default, the Windows UI does not expose anything at all that would help the users to recognize the file tagging possibility. So we do have a more or less full support for tagging files and yet Microsoft hides this quite well from the common eye. Probably for a good reason, which we are going to find out below.

Although I'm very interested in topics related to tagging this feature is that well hidden so that I was not aware of this feature myself until I read about it in a book in 2018. Support for tagging started as early as with Windows Vista.

How to See and Assign Tags

In order to see and edit file tags, you have to enable "View (Tab) → Details pane" in the File Explorer.

There is a second UI feature you might want to activate: the read-only Tags column is activated by choosing "Tags" in the context menu of the column bar:

When you go through different files, you will recognize that not all file types can be tagged by default. For example, the details pane for a simple text file does not show the "Tags: Add a tag" in contrast to any JPEG image file as shown in the screen-shots above.

Assigned tags are visible in the details pane as well as in the tags column:

Adding or modifying tags is possible in the Details pane but not in the tags column. You will recognize that Microsoft allows tags with spaces and special characters. Multiple tags are usually separated by semicolons which is probably the only standard character which is not allowed within tags.

The last place where File Explorer is showing you the assigned tags and also allows to edit them is within the Properties of a file:

As shown in the screenshots above, tags might be added/removed/modified at two places: either on the "Details pane" (on the right hand side of the File Explorer window) or within the file properties on its "Details" tab.

How to Make Use of Tags

Now that we have tagged some files, what possibilities are there to use this meta-data in daily life? First of all, there is navigation. For navigating through your files, you might prefer your File Explorer sorted alphabetically by file name:

With tags, you might also sort alphabetically by tags instead:

Since the order of files in the "sorted by tags"-view is depending on the order of tags within the files, I do not consider this a great improvement. However, what is really neat is when you consider the "Group by"-method. Be default, File Explorer is grouping by names:

You can change the grouping in the "View" tab of the File Explorer:

Having switched to "Group by Tags", you will notice that all files are arranged by their assigned tags:

Untagged files are listed in the "Unspecified" category at the bottom. The categories above correspond to the alphabetically sorted list of tags. Each file is listed once for each tag. So if a file like does have two different tags ("Dogs" and "House"), it is listed twice. One time in the category "Dogs" and one time in the category "House". If you select it in one category, this single file gets selected in all categories.

Complementary to file navigation, File Explorer has a search feature implemented. The following image shows the result when you do search for a tag "house" within the folder we've used above:

You will notice that all files are listed in the results that do feature the tag "house" or "House". So search as well as "Group by Tags" is case insensitive when it comes to tags. All other files, not having the "house" tag, are omitted.

When you search for multiple tags, just the files that do contain all of them are listed:

On the negative side, you can not search for keywords that only occur within tags. I would have expected a query language according to the widespread pattern like "tag:dog" which would look for the occurrence of "dog" but only within the tags and not the file name or the content.

So if you're searching for "dog", you will find files that contain the tag dog as well as files that do contain "dog" within their file name:

This File Explorer tag search is not a sub-string search: if you want to find files tagged with "mydog", you can not find them by searching for "dog". However, when you have tagged files with "my dog", you will find them in the search results for "dog" but not within search results for "dogs".

In summary: Searching for tags is:

  • case-insensitive,
  • non-sub-string,
  • whole-word and not whole-tag.

Playing Around With Tags

When you play around with different tags, you will find out that this feature is intended to be used case-insensitive. When you tag a file with "Dog" and "dog", the last one wins and the other gets removed.

When "Arrange by Tags" is used, the tag "Dog" as well as "dog" gets listed in the category "Dog".

When you select multiple tagged files, the Details pane shows only the tags that can be found within all selected files. The other ones are not visualized. You may add additional tags which then gets added to all selected files:

You may remove all tags of one or a set of selected files with "Properties → Details → Remove ...".

This page mentions a context menu function to export the meta-data of selected files to an file. Meta-data from an file could be applied to the files as well. I was not able to find this function in my tests.

Enabled File Types for Tagging

In the previous sections I mentioned briefly that only a sub-set of file types may be tagged by default. In my opinion, this is a very tough restriction if you want to use tags for organizing your files.

On a fresh Windows 10 installation, there are not even a hundred file types that may be tagged. When apps get installed like Microsoft Office or LibreOffice, meta-data handlers for additional file formats gets added and configured. On my business Windows 10 system approximately 180 extensions had associated meta-data handlers. After installing LibreOffice on a Windows 10 virtual machine, about 120 extensions were listed as tag-able, approximately thirty of them from LibreOffice alone. I noticed that LibreOffice does not create meta-data handlers for Microsoft formats such as or whereas handler for older formats are created: or .

It is important to know that not all meta-data handlers offer meta-data tagging by keywords. Only meta-data handlers that contain definitions for "System.Keywords" result in the ability to be tagged. Furthermore, not all meta-data handlers that contains keywords/tags offer them also in file properties.

I tried to come up with a minimum list of activated tagging via meta-data handlers. When downloading a fresh Windows 10 virtual machine like that one, you will find some tools pre-installed. In this case, these are many development tools. After manually installing DotNet, LibreOffice 5.4.4, paint.net 4.2.5, all extensions with enabled handlers for keywords/tags are:

.asf .cr2 .crw .dng .doc .dot .dvr-ms .erf .flac .jfif .jpe .jpeg .jpg .jxr .kdc .m1v .m2t .m2ts .m2v .m4a .m4b .m4p .m4v .mka .mkv .mod .mov .mp2 .mp2v .mp4 .mp4v .mp3 .mpeg .mpg .mpv2 .mrw .msi .msp .mts .nef .nrw .pef .raf .raw .rw2 .rwl .sr2 .srw .tif .tiff .tod .ts .tts .uvu .vob .wdp .weba .webm .wma .wmv

I did not mention all well-known LibreOffice formats that were also in the list.

As you can see, most of these activated file types do not reflect bug relevance for the average user. Selected extensions that do not have handlers or no handlers that provide tagging:

.avi .docx .exe .gif .lnk .mp3 .png .wav .css .csv .epub .gz .html .json .java .txt .wmf .xhtml .xlsx .zip

Therefore, there are many file types which may be used on any given Windows machine that can not be tagged by default.

How to Enable Tags for More File Types

After we have found out that it would be nice to have more file formats enabled for tagging, how are we able to enable meta-data handlers ourselves?

The answer lies within a project called FileMeta. You can download the latest release on their release page. Installing this tool requires administration permissions. I totally recommend the documentation pages for learning about details on this topic in general.

After installing FileMeta, you will find multiple executables in its install directory: , and .

Most things can also be done on the command line. For configuring the tagging functionality, we'll stick to the graphical for this article. After starting up the File Meta Association Manager you will see three main parts of the UI:

  1. Some workflows for manipulating on the left hand side,
  2. the File Extensions list with the handler associations and
  3. the meta-data related settings on the right hand side:

Extending the List of File Extensions

The list of the file extensions are read from the Windows registry. If you can not find a specific file extension in the File Meta Association Manager, no application has registered the file extension so far. If you do associate a file extension with an application ("Always open with ..."), this does not create a registry entry. Therefore, associating an extension with an application is not sufficient that this extension gets listed in the File Meta Association Manager.

To add an extension not listed yet, you have to start the registry editor with administrator privileges, go to "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE" → "SOFTWARE" → "Classes" and choose "New → Key" from the context menu.

Then you can enter your new extension like, e.g., and confirm with the return key. After restarting the File Meta Association Manager you'll find the new extension in the list.

Pre-Defined Profiles

My File Meta Association Manager lists two pre-defined profiles: "Simple" and "OfficeDSOfile". The latter seems to be set up by LibreOffice. The "Simple" profile has a few properties set up for "Preview Panel", "Details tab in Properties" and "Info Tip":

Custom Profiles

If you would like to set up a new custom profile, you have to know:

  • Full details → Description "System.Keywords": necessary to see and edit tags in the preferences → Details tab.
  • The Preview Panel → "System.Keywords": necessary to see and edit tags in the Details pane.

You can't have Details pane without preferences Details tab. Both settings enable the tags shown in the column bar.

Therefore, a minimal custom profile for tagging where you can see the tags in the Details tab looks like that:

Such a profile results in a File Explorer view like that, where you can edit tags in the preferences as well as in the Details tab:

Whenever you change meta-data handlers, you will probably going to restart the File Explorer via the "Restart Explorer" button of the File Meta Association Manager in order to apply changes.

After setting up a custom meta-data handler for file extensions, you can see them also in the command line tool :

c:\Program Files\File Metadata>FileMetaAssoc.exe -l .txt Simple File Meta Property Handler c:\Program Files\File Metadata>

Relations Between Applications and Meta-Data

As mentioned briefly before, some applications do create meta-data handlers for file extensions when being installed. For example, LibreOffice is creating handlers for their document formats as well as some formats from Microsoft such as or but not or .

Programs like LibreOffice Writer or Microsoft Word do provide meta-data within the preferences of an open document.

You are able to enter tags within the document properties:

These tags can now be seen in the file properties (Details tab) as well as in the tags column. Because of the missing "System.Keywords" in the profile for the "Preview Panel", the tags are not shown in the Details tab of the File Explorer:

Here is the File Meta Association Manager profile "LibreOffice property handler" as set up by LibreOffice:

It's interesting to see that the "LibreOffice property handler" is not visible in the File Meta Association Manager profiles. So I tried to overwrite the "LibreOffice property handler" with the "Simple" profile. To my surprise, this happened:

Yes, this makes sense after all. After confirming this dialogue, the File Meta Association Manager window was gone. I thought that this action was not successful and the app crashed. After restarting the application, I noticed the successfully merged profiles for the extension.

Unfortunately, in contrast to my expectations, there was no change: no tags visible in Preview page of File Explorer and tags in Details tab can not be changed, only viewed. So this was not a success after all: I still can not modify tags for LibreOffice Writer files outside of LibreOffice Writer file preferences although they can be seen in File Explorer.

So I started to create some non-native LibreOffice Writer documents: and . For files, there were no document property tags visible in File Explorer: not in Preview pane, not in tags column and not in the file properties.

Different story with the files though: Here, the document property tags are synchronized with the NTFS meta-data. Whenever a tag is added or changed in the file properties, the same change appears in the LibreOffice Writer document properties and vice versa. However, there are no tags/keywords visible in the Preview pane.

This tag synchronization mechanism has a minor issue: when you do not create a file from within LibreOffice Writer or Microsoft Word but with a text editor, there is no within-file meta-data preferences yet. This results in an error message when you want to tag a zero byte file in File Explorer:

When you do select "New → Excel Spreadsheet" in File Explorer with Microsoft Office installed, it does not create a zero byte file as with Word files using the same method. Instead, it fills the spreadsheet file with a seven kilobyte default content. This way, you won't get this error message for Excel files in this situation.

Related to this, you can read on the FileMeta FAQ for PDF files:

If I add the File Meta Property Handler for PDF files, will I see properties already in those files? No, unless you are using version 1.4 and are extending an existing property handler for PDF files. File Meta has no capability otherwise for reading properties held within the PDF formatted part of the file. File Meta always writes properties in an NTFS-provided annex to the file. [...] The bad news is that File Meta before version 1.4 will not read properties held in the type-specific formatted part of a file, and no version of File Meta will update such properties.

To make this even more complicated, you have to know that Windows supports tags for every file type, internally. They will not be visible in the properties section of that file, but when you search for those tags, the file appears in search results.

After all these experiences I can only sum up my experience with: it's very complicated. The end-user can not expect tags/keywords to be visible in the File Explorer. She is not able to know if document preference keywords are synchronized to the NTFS meta-data. If there are tags visible, they may not be able to be managed on the Preview pane or the file preferences. File Explorer search seems to find all keywords so far. However, you don't know that a specific file was found because of a tag or anything else since this visualization is missing.

History, Implementation Details, and Similar Implementations

You can read about the history of this feature and some technical details on this page. Basically, NTFS stores the meta-data within an Alternate data streams (ADS). This is quite similar to how Apple stored meta-data in HFS+ and probably also within AFS. I was using the color labels of OS X up to Leopard. They ended up as file-system based meta-data as well.

You can read on this Wikipedia article:

In Apple's macOS, the operating system has allowed users to assign multiple arbitrary tags as extended file attributes to any file or folder ever since OS X 10.9 was released in 2013, and before that time the open-source OpenMeta standard provided similar tagging functionality in macOS.

Windows 10 Tags Considered as Fragile

I do think that the average reader does agree that using tags with this Windows 10 feature is a drag from the user experience point of view already. I do have sad news: this now even gets worse.

Since meta-data are stored in NTFS data streams, you are losing all of the tags when files get moved to someplace where there are no NTFS data streams or when applications generating files do not respect them properly. As a consequence, there are many possibilities where meta-data gets lost. Here is a list of the most obvious ones.

  1. Losing meta-data when copying to a thumb drive
    • Copying a tagged file to a drive that is not formatted with NTFS results in a silent loss of the meta-data. Thumb drives usually are formatted with FAT32.
  2. Losing meta-data when sending them via email
    • When you attach a tagged file to an email, the meta-data does not get attached as well.
  3. Losing meta-data because of applications handling temporary files
    • When you open a file in too many Windows applications, new modifications by the user get written to a temporary file. On saving the changes to the file, this temporary file then gets renamed to the original file name, overwriting the previous file as well as the meta-data. This is a very mean behavior since users would never expect to lose meta-data just by saving a file.
  4. Losing meta-data when doing backup
    • When you back up your data, the backup application needs to save and restore meta-data within ADS properly. I did not investigate this issue but my gut feelings are that only a fraction of the tools on the market do consider ADS meta-data and handle them accordingly.

Summary and Remarks

After being enthusiastic when I found out that Microsoft provides a native file tagging ecosystem with Windows, I had to take a closer look. This enthusiasm was replaced by a disillusion. Everything related to file tagging is hidden from the common user by default. Enabling it results in manual labor not only for the UI but also for each and every file extension separately. Although there are some nice retrieval features for navigation, search does not differ between keywords in tags and keywords anywhere else. It is not entirely clear to me how file-format-specific tags interact with the NTFS tags. Finally, when you did invest some time for tagging files, there is a high chance of losing all this meta-data sometimes without even realizing it.

If Microsoft would act in a way that somebody would be thinking that this tagging feature is ready for production, it would qualify for my bad design decisions series. For me personally, I'd never invest anything in using this feature mainly because of the many ways of losing meta-data without noticing. My current approach for tagging is described on this article. It's an OS-independent and app-independent method with very nice features like TagTrees you can not find elsewhere.

If you would like to get an overview on other non-file-system-based tagging solutions, you can read the bachelor thesis "Marktübersicht von Tagging-Werkzeugen und Vergleich mit tagstore" which can be downloaded at the tagstore page. It's in German language and it reflects the situation of the year 2013.

Before writing this article I needed to implement a necessary feature for my blogging system beforehand. With this, you are now able to click on the screenshot previews to see them with their original size. So this article was in my personal pipe-line for over a year. As a consequence, early findings and screen shots from 2018 are based on whereas the most current ones from 2019 are based on .

Congratulations for following this very long blog article until its end. I hope I could teach you something on Windows 10 functions and help you decide on its usefulness for your situation. Drop me a line in the comments below when you do have some questions or remarks.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Forget Folders: The Best Ways to Organize Your Files with Tags and Labels

Trying to find old files is like trying to go back in time and read your own mind. Where would I have saved those pictures from Australia?!? you think, before spending a frustrating half hour digging through folders and folders of miscellaneous images. What would I have called that report I wrote in August 2012?!?

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Tags (or labels in some apps) can eliminate these exasperating and time-consuming mental exercises. With a couple of tags, you can instantly categorize and label files for hassle-free searches down the road, and then find all of those files again easily no matter where you save them.

Let's explore why tagging is so useful, and how to set up your own tag system. Then, we’ll dive into how to tag your emails, photos, notes, and files, and glance at the benefits of using tags alongside folders.



Intro to Tagging

Tags

Tags are keywords you assign to files. Think of them like characteristics for a person: Just like you’d describe someone as "tall," "funny," "brunette," and so on, you’d tag a file "important," "tax info," "just for fun," or "work."

But why use tags, when you could just use folders?

A file can only be in one folder at a time—but it could have an unlimited number of tags. Say you've made a project brief for a client and you want to save it in the specific project folder and to the client’s main folder. With folders, you'd have to pick one folder or duplicate the file, which could cause issues. Tags, on the other hand, are perfect for adding category data like this, since you can add as many tags as you want to a file. You could tag the document with both the project’s name and the client’s name, then save the file just in the project's folder.

Tags are the simplest way to add data to files without dealing with endless layers of folders. They're perhaps your most flexible tool for organizing your files.

Related: Folders are still essential, however. Here's how to best organize your files and folders.

Tagging Best Practices

Of course, the flexibility and unlimited nature of tags can be dangerous. It’s easy to spend fifteen extra minutes adding a ton of tags every time you save a new file—and it’s also easy to create so many different tags that you completely forget which ones you’ve used.

How to Establish a Tag System

Luckily, you can avoid these issues by establishing a system. Your first step: Figure out your high-level tags. These types of tags divide your content into the most general categories possible, which usually means by type. Examples:

  • A bookstore creates separate spaces for books depending on their genre: mystery, romance, historical fiction, and so on.

  • If you’re making a tag system for your spreadsheets, your high-level tags might be "budget," "schedule," "estimate," "invoice," and "Gantt charts."

  • if you're building a system for documents, you could add tags for "reports," "blog posts," "letters," and so forth.

Also consider making tags for the status of your files. I tag (or label) my emails as "Answer," "Done," "Pending," and "Ignore," for example. Being able to sort my inbox into these categories helps me stay on top of things.

Make Your Tags Consistent

Strive for consistency with your tags. For instance, will you use singular or plural terms ("report" versus "reports"?) Which word type will you use: nouns, adjectives, verbs, or a combination of the three? Are you going to capitalize tags or leave them lowercase? Will you incorporate symbols and characters? The more standardized your system is, the easier it’ll be to find files.

As a rule of thumb, keep your tags to two words or less. If you find yourself going over that limit, it may make more sense to create two separate tags—for example, rather than tagging something as "Q1 expense report," you could tag it as "Q1" and "expense report."

Once you’ve come up with 10-plus tags, it’s a good idea to create a master list. I use an Evernote note to keep track of all my tags. This list helps jog my memory if I ever forget a tag; plus, I can periodically look it over to find and delete tags I didn’t end up needing.

Use Tags with Folders

Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders *and* tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

Not everyone is a fan of using tags. Tiago Forte, founder of productivity training firm Forte Labs, explains, "When you rely heavily on tags, you have to perfectly recall every single tag you’ve ever used, and exactly how it is spelled and punctuated."

Plus, Forte says, it’s much easier to remember things with physical locations. That’s why you have to concentrate on memorizing a single phone number, but you can immediately recall where you left hundreds of items in your home.

"Tags force us to think about our notes in a completely abstract way," he argues. Folders, on the other hand, let us "place" our notes in a single physical location.

Forte definitely has a point. It can be time-consuming to tag every file—especially if you can’t remember those tags when you need them. If you’re producing a relatively small amount of work, using tags might not be productive.

However, there’s also a case to be made for a folder and tag system.

Four researchers from the University of Washington studied the comparative benefits folders and tags. According to their research, it’s easier to find files using labels rather than folders. Plus, picking out the right folder can take more work than choosing tags, because you have to select the "right" one. However, because folders let you visually put away your work, they make you feel more organized.

Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders and tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

And great news: we’ve got a comprehensive guide to organizing your files and folders.


Now that you've got a tag system, let's put it to work. Here's how you can organize your email, photos, notes, and files with tags.

Tag Your Email Messages

We receive a lot of email each day—too much, in fact. With so many messages flowing in and out of your inbox, being able to quickly organize them with tags could make the difference between order and chaos.

Gmail introduced labels (which are tags) to email when it first launched in 2004, and today it's still the leader in tagging emails. Here's how to use its tag tools to sort your messages.

How to Label Emails in Gmail (Web, iOS, Android)

Gmail

To use labels in Gmail, you’ll have to manually tag each email or take a bit more time to create filters to add them. You can find the Labels option by clicking the gear icon, choosing "Settings," and navigating to the "Labels" tab.

Scroll down to the bottom and select "Create new label." You can choose when the label shows up in your label list and inbox. If you have more than five labels, I recommend using the "show if unread" feature so they only show up when you have unopened emails.

Gmail also lets you color-code labels for a way to identify them at a glance. Find your label in the sidebar, hover over it, and then click the small three-dot icon next to its name. Then select choose "Label color." You can choose from pre-existing colors, or even create your own.

Tip: Learn how to get the most out of Gmail's labels—and add them to emails automatically with filters—in Zapier's Gmail Guide.

Of course, other email programs also offer tagging or labeling options. In Microsoft Outlook, for example, common tags—called Categories—are already set up for you, but you can edit them, create new ones, and color-code them too.

Tag Your Photos

Finding a specific picture can take forever. First, you have to remember where you saved it on your computer. Then, you have to dig through thousands of photos before finding the one you were looking for. Unless you name each photo, you can’t look up the title of a photo the same way you’d type in the name of a spreadsheet or presentation, so manually combing through your archives is typically your best option.

Tags make finding photos far speedier. Just tag each with its location, subject, date, and the people in it, and you’ll have four different ways to locate it. Creating your own tags will give you even more options.

You'll find tags in advanced photo management tools like Lightroom, but here are some simpler apps to help organize your photo library.

Pixave (Mac)

Pixave

When you save multiple photos, you probably want to apply one or more tags to all of them. For instance, if you import 30 pictures from your last family reunion, you’d tag all 30 with "family reunion," the location, and the date. Pixave makes it easy to add multiple tags to multiple images at once. With its drag and drop tagging, you can simply highlight the relevant tags and place them on the matching pictures.

When you’re exporting images, the app saves their tags as keywords in their metadata. That means you won’t have to go through the hard work of re-labeling images once you’ve moved them to another platform.

And Pixave also automatically import images from a designated folder and apply tags for you. Talk about convenience!

Price: $14.99

Google Photos (Web, iOS, Android)

Google Photos

Technically, Google Photos is the anti-tagging tool. There’s no way to add tags within the app—the closest you can get is adding labels to people’s faces (e.g. "Daniel" or "Aja").

But Google Photos has such a powerful search, you'll feel like you've already added tags to every photo. It uses Google's AI to identify objects in your photos, so you can search for "watermelon" or "water sports" and find photos containing either in seconds.

It's magical—and if every app's search worked this well, you wouldn't need tags nearly as much.

Price: Free

Tip: The latest version of Apple Photos includes similar features, identifying locations and common objects in the photos on your iPhone, iPad, and macOS.

Tag Your Notes

You probably take notes all day long: in the morning, when you think of a random idea; on the subway, when you jot down a question; at your desk, when you write down your goals for the next day, and so on. Recording your miscellaneous thoughts is helpful—but only if you can find them again later.

Tags give you the power to organize a vast web of interconnected ideas, where saving notes in individual notebooks just won't cut it. Here's how to organize your notes with tags.

Evernote (Web, macOS, PC, iOS, Android)

Evernote clipper

This notebook app wants to be your digital memory, housing everything from simple checklists and detailed checklists to images, PDFs, documents, and more. Of course, the more content you collect, the more important tags become.

Evernote makes adding tags a cinch. If you use the app’s web extension, you can tag files while you save them. To tag a current note within the app, click the small "tag" icon next to the name of its notebook.

It’s also easy to browse your notes by tag. On the left menu sidebar, click on "Tags" to see all of your tags.

Evernote also lets you create nested tags, something you don't usually find with tags in other apps. For example, engineer Thomas Honeyman created a parent tag for "Projects" with three child tags: "Artistic projects," "Business projects," and "School projects."

To create your own tag hierarchy, open up the "Tags" page, then drag and drop the sub-tag onto the main one.

Tags appear alphabetically by default. If you want, say, "Work task" to appear before "Grocery list," use a hashtag, period, or symbol. The tags with non-alphanumeric symbols will show up last.

Price: Free Basic plan for standard features for 2 devices and up to 60MB uploads per month; from $7.99/month Premium plan for unlimited devices, 10GB monthly uploads, and features like offline notebook access; $14.99/user/month for Evernote Business

For a deeper look at Evernote features and pricing plans, check out ourEvernote review.

See Evernote integrations on Zapier

Learn more about Evernote with our roundup of 30 Evernote Tips and Tricks.

OneNote (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android)

OneNote

Looking for a way to tag specific sections of your notes, rather than the entire document? OneNote lets you do just that—and a lot more. Its searchable tags make it easy to pull up every related snippet of your work. For example, you can tag one part of your note with the "idea" tag and another as a "to do."

When you search OneNote for a tag, the Tag Summary page will show you all the related notes and give you the option of grouping tags, too.

Price: Free

Tag Your Files

The latest versions of macOS and Windows make it easy to add tags to almost anything.

Mac

Tagging on the Mac

Thanks to macOS' tagging feature, you can find any file on your Mac in just three steps. Step one: press command + space to open Spotlight. Step two: enter your tag (or tags). Step three: look through the results to find the right file.

But before you can become a master of the quick search, you’ll need to actually tag your files. It’s easy to add tags while saving a file: Just choose the relevant ones from the drop-down menu underneath the file’s name or type a new tag to add it to the list.

If you want to tag a file you’ve already saved, find it in your Finder window, right-click, and select "Tags." You’ll be able to add existing tags or create new ones.

By default, the built-in color tags show up in your Sidebar menu. However, you’ll probably want to customize this section so it displays your most important or frequently used tags. To do so, open Finder, click "Preferences," and select "Tags," then drag-and-drop the tags into the order you want. You can also change each tag’s color.

Windows

Tags in Windows

Windows users can harness the power of tags as well. When you’re saving specific file types (including Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, Powerpoints, photos, videos, and new folders) you can add tags using the "Tags" field.

Looking to label a file you’ve already saved? Click on it to open its details, then you should see the option to type new tags under the "Date created" field.

For the majority of people, these options will be enough. But if you want to tag non-supported file types, like plain text (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf) files, upgrade to a third-party tagging app.

Price: Free

The Best Apps to Tag Your Files

Not content with your computer’s built-in file management system? Luckily, there are plenty of third-party apps to choose from. These options all make it simple to add, edit, and find tags.

TagSpaces (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android, Linux)

TagSpaces

Most of us take a squirrel-like approach to our files, saving some in Dropbox, some on our computer, some in Google Drive, some in Evernote, and so forth. That means it’s tricky to find files even with tags—after all, before you can search "resume" and "marketing jobs," you have to first remember where you saved all your resume drafts.

That's where TagSpaces comes in. This free app provides cross-platform file tagging and finding, so that you can organize everything the same way regardless of where it’s saved. In other words, if you type "resume" and "marketing jobs" into TagSpaces, it’ll search through every file you’ve ever saved to find the ones with those tags.

However, that’s not the only reason to download TagSpaces. It also lets you bulk tag files, which is handy when you’re downloading, say, photos from your hackathon, or the presentations from a conference. Even better, you can create tag groups. To give you an idea, you could make a "sales team" tag group containing tags for each individual sales rep.

Smart tags are also handy. These automatic, time-sensitive tags let you quickly find files by when you saved them; for instance, if you wanted to locate a document you’d saved this morning, you’d search with the "today" tag.

Price: Free

Tabbles (Windows)

Tabbles

Visual thinkers, rejoice: Tabbles was designed with you in mind. Every tag is represented by a colorful bubble called a "tabble." When you want to place a file into a tabble, you simply drag-and-drop it. That might sound a bit like putting a file into a folder, but files can belong to an unlimited number of tabbles at once.

What if you’re putting the same types of files into the same tabbles over and over again? Rather than doing unnecessary work, set up tagging rules. You can define which tabbles new files are housed in based on their name, file type, content, or some combination of the above. As an example, imagine you want every Powerpoint file with "winter conference" in its name to be saved to the "Winter Conference" and "Work Presentations" tabbles.

Tabbles is free for up to 5,000 files. Paid options offeryou can save an unlimited number of files; plus, you can integrate with cloud sync servers and share your tags with your coworkers.

Price: Free for up to 5,000 files; from €1,5/month for paid options, which include more files, tag sharing, and syncing tags across multiple devices

Turn Tags into Actions

Does the thought of going through and tagging each and every file in your digital archives sound overwhelming? It did to me—so I decided to start fresh. Every new file I save gets tagged, but I don’t worry about the old ones. I’d definitely recommend this strategy if you’ve already got a full library of files and not enough time to categorize them all.

If you want to take your tagging to the next level, create a workflow that sends information you tag in one app to another with Zapier, an app integration tool. You can automatically send messages from Gmail with a specific tag (label) to a new card in Trello, for example, or create notes with a specific tag in Evernote from one of your other favorite apps.

Here are some ideas to help get you started turning tags into actions:

Organize Emails and Contacts

Save Tagged Articles

Share Tagged Posts


Happy tagging!

This post was originally published in August 2016 and updated for current app info and other details.

Title image by Metaphox via Flickr. Tags photo by Gustavo da Cunha Pimenta.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Delete These Windows Files and Folders to Free Up Disk Space

Windows contains plenty of files and folders that you don't really need. Between hidden caches, old junk that wastes space, and files you can delete to actually solve problems, knowing what's safe to remove from Windows can be challenging.

Let's step through some Windows files and folders that are totally safe to remove, along with why you might want to erase them. This will help you free up disk space and learn more about your PC. Note that some of these folders are in protected locations, so take care when deleting them.

The Best Way to Clean Windows Folders: Disk Cleanup

Before we look at Windows files and folders you can safely remove, you should know that manually deleting them isn't usually the best way to go about it.

Aside from wasting time doing this yourself when you could automate the process, it's safer to let the Disk Cleanup tool do these cleanings for you. This avoids accidentally deleting files that you need, or messing with the wrong folders.

The Windows Disk Cleanup tool helps you reclaim disk space on your computer and is simple to use. You can open it by searching for Disk Cleanup in the Start menu and selecting a drive. Let it scan, and you'll see several categories of files you can erase. For more options, choose Clean up system files with administrator permissions.

If you find this interface too clunky, you can browse to Settings > System > Storage to try Windows 10's newer storage cleanup tool. Click Temporary files in the list of options, then you'll see a list populate that's similar to what Disk Cleanup has.

What to Delete From Disk Cleanup

This isn't a full guide to the Disk Cleanup tool, so we're not going to look at every option it offers. However, the following several options are low-hanging fruit (make sure to select Clean up system files first to see them all):

  • Windows Update Cleanup: This erases old copies of Windows Update files. These are safe to delete in most cases, but you should keep them for troubleshooting if you run into update-related issues.
  • Windows upgrade log files: Similarly, these are data files that Windows Update keeps to help you dig into problems around upgrades or installations. You can erase these if you haven't had errors related to upgrading Windows to a new version.
  • Language resource files: If you've previously downloaded another language or keyboard layout that you don't use, this will let you easily erase it.
  • Recycle Bin: While you can empty the Recycle Bin through its own window, you can also do it easily here. Just make sure there's nothing inside it that you need.
  • Temporary files: As their name suggests, temporary files aren't used for anything in the long-term, so you can erase them without worry.

Now, let's look at what you can delete from Windows 10 safely.

1. The Hibernation File

Location: C:\hiberfil.sys

Hibernation mode on your PC is similar to sleep mode, except the system saves all your open work to the storage drive and then shuts down. You can remove the battery from your laptop and stay in hibernation for a week, then start back up and pick up right where you left off.

Of course, this takes up space, which is what the hibernation file is for. Depending on your hard drive size, the hibernation file is likely several gigabytes or more.

If you don't use hibernation and want to disable it, you can easily do so via the Command Prompt. Note that you shouldn't just delete hiberfil.sys, as Windows will recreate it again.

Right-click on the Start button or press Win + X, then open a Command Prompt (Admin) or Windows PowerShell (Admin) window from the resulting menu. Type the following command to disable hibernation:

That's all it takes to disable hibernation. Windows should delete hiberfil.sys on its own when you do this; feel free to delete it after if not. Note that disabling hibernate mode will also prevent your computer from using fast startup in Windows 10. However, this isn't much of a loss, as this feature is known to cause slow boot times and other problems.

2. Windows Temp Folder

Location: C:\Windows\Temp

As you'd guess from the name, Windows temporary files aren't important beyond their initial use. The files and folders inside contain info that Windows used at one time, but doesn't need anymore.

Instead of cleaning via Disk Cleanup. you can visit this folder and delete its contents manually, if you want. Just press Ctrl + A to select everything inside, then hit Delete. Windows might give you an error about a couple of items when you do this—just ignore those and clear everything else.

3. The Recycle Bin

Location: shell:RecycleBinFolder

The Recycle Bin is a special folder—while it appears under your C:\ drive, this is protected by Windows and you don't need to access it that way. Whenever you delete a file on your system, Windows sends it to the Recycle Bin. This is a special place where deleted files are kept until you permanently delete or restore them.

While this might be obvious to you, we're including it in case some aren't aware. It's easy to forget that gigabytes of old data can sit in your Recycle Bin.

You can access the Recycle Bin through the shortcut on your desktop. If you don't see that, type shell:RecycleBinFolder into File Explorer's navigation bar. Once here, you'll see everything you've deleted recently.

Right-click on individual items and choose Delete to permanently erase them, or choose Restore to send the file back to its original location. On the top Ribbon's Recycle Bin Tools tab, you'll see buttons to Empty Recycle Bin and Restore all items at once.

To tweak the way the Recycle Bin works, click Recycle Bin properties here. On this menu, you can change the maximum size of the bin, or even choose Don't move files to the Recycle Bin.

With this option, Windows skips the bin and permanently removes items when you delete them. We don't recommend this, because the Recycle Bin gives you a second chance in case of an accidental deletion. Similarly, Display delete confirmation dialog will require an extra step whenever you erase a file.

4. Windows.old Folder

Location: C:\Windows.old

Whenever you upgrade your version of Windows, the system keeps a copy of your prior files called Windows.old. This folder essentially holds everything that made up your old installation, in case something didn't transfer correctly.

If necessary, you can use this folder to roll back to a previous version of Windows. It's also possible to open the folder and grab a few stray files if you need.

Windows automatically removes this folder a short time after upgrading, but you can remove it yourself if you're crunched for space. It won't delete if you try to go through the File Explorer, so type Disk Cleanup into the Start Menu and launch the tool as described earlier.

Click Clean up system files at the bottom of the window and let the utility do another scan. Once that's done, look for the Previous Windows installation(s) and delete it using this tool.

Obviously, removing these files makes it harder to recover data in case of an issue. After performing a Windows upgrade (even just to the latest version of Windows 10) we advise you to hold onto this folder until you're sure everything is working properly.

5. Downloaded Program Files

Location: C:\Windows\Downloaded Program Files

This folder's name is a bit confusing. It actually holds files used by Internet Explorer's ActiveX controls and Java applets, so if you use the same feature on a website, you don't have to download it twice.

In effect, this folder is useless today. ActiveX is an extremely outdated technology that's full of security holes, and Java is near-extinct on today's web. Internet Explorer is the only browser that supports ActiveX, and you'll probably only encounter it on ancient corporate websites (if ever) now.

Most home users don't use IE anymore, let alone ActiveX. Your Downloaded Program Files folder might already be empty, but feel free to clean out its contents if it's not.

6. LiveKernelReports

Location: C:\Windows\LiveKernelReports

The LiveKernelReports folder is another directory which likely comes up when you're scanning for large files on your computer. This folder is home to dump files, which are ongoing information logs that Windows keeps. If your computer runs into an issue, you can analyze the contents of these files to start troubleshooting your problem.

Read more: How to Troubleshoot Windows Problems Using Event Viewer Logs

Any huge files ending with the DMP file extension in this folder are safe to delete. Like the above locations, though, we recommend using Disk Cleanup instead of deleting the file yourself.

When Windows crashes or you have other major computer problems, don't delete these dump files right away. You can use a program like WhoCrashed to get more info from them.

7. Rempl Folder

Location: C:\Program Files\rempl

While the Rempl folder isn't large, you might be surprised when you see it appear on your system. It contains several small files, and you might even notice a few Task Manager processes connected to it.

This folder is connected to Windows 10 update delivery. It includes "reliability improvements" to help make Windows 10 updates go smoothly and iron out compatibility issues.

So can you delete the Rempl folder? There are seemingly no adverse effects from doing so. However, since it only takes up a few megabytes and can make Windows upgrades less frustrating, it's best to keep it around.

These Windows Folders Can Be Deleted

It takes a bit of looking around, but Windows holds plenty of files and folders that aren't necessary. Remember that your computer does a pretty good job of keeping itself clean, so you don't have to obsessively remove the contents of these folders unless you're really low on disk space.

Running the Disk Cleanup tool once or twice a month should do enough to keep the cruft away. If you still need to free up a lot of space, try uninstalling some unnecessary Windows software.

12 Unnecessary Windows Programs and Apps You Should Uninstall

Wondering which Windows 10 apps to uninstall? Here are several unnecessary Windows 10 apps, programs, and bloatware you should remove.

Read Next

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Ben Stegner (1785 Articles Published)

Ben is a Deputy Editor and the Onboarding Manager at MakeUseOf. He left his IT job to write full-time in 2016 and has never looked back. He's been covering tech tutorials, video game recommendations, and more as a professional writer for over seven years.

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How to Extract RAR File in Windows 10?

Tagging Files With Windows 10

This quite lengthy article explains and discusses the built-in file tagging implementation of Microsoft Windows 10. I do have a strong background with PIM and tagging and this article is written from the human perspective when manually tagging user-generated files.

To my knowledge, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, Microsoft is currently not actively promoting this feature. Therefore, complaining on bad design decisions does not apply here as long as Microsoft does not understand this kind of tagging as something which was designed to be used by the general user, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Because from my perspective, it obviously can't be meant to be used in practice. Unfortunately. Let's take a closer look why I came to this conclusion.

TL;DR: Microsoft Windows does provide NTFS features to tag arbitrary files. Some applications do Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version merge format-specific tags with these NTFS tags. Although there are quite nice retrieval functions for tags, it is very complicated to use this for general file management, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Applied tags are easily lost so that in practice, users will refrain from using native Windows file tagging like this.

Table of contents:

  1. What Does Tagging Mean Here?
  2. A Well-Hidden Feature
  3. How to See and Assign Tags
  4. How to Make Use of Tags
  5. Playing Around With Tags
  6. Enabled File Types for Tagging
  7. How to Enable Tags for More File Types
  8. Relations Between Applications and Meta-Data
  9. History, Implementation Details, and Similar Implementations
  10. Windows 10 Tags Considered as Fragile
  11. Summary and Remarks

What Does Tagging Mean Here?

For this article, I am talking about non-collaborative local file-tagging. This describes the process of attaching one or more unique keywords to files stored on NTFS file systems by users who are able to access the file with granted write-permissions via the Windows File Explorer. "Keywords" and "tags" are used as synonyms here.

I could elaborate on tag and tag-system definitions for quite some time but let us stop here for the sake of brevity. It will be a long journey after all.

A Well-Hidden Feature

By default, the Windows UI does not expose anything at all that would help the users to recognize the file tagging possibility. So we do have a more or less full support for tagging files and yet Microsoft hides this quite well from UC Browser APK for Android (2021 Latest) for Windows 10, 8, 7 Download common eye. Probably for a good reason, which we are going to find out below.

Although ArcGIS Pro 2.6.1 License Key Archives very interested in topics related to tagging this feature is that well hidden so that I was not aware of this feature myself until I read about it in a book in 2018. Support for tagging started as early as with Windows Vista.

How to See and Assign Tags

In order to see and edit file tags, you Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version to enable "View (Tab) → Details pane" in the File Explorer.

There is a second UI feature you might want to activate: the read-only Tags column is activated by choosing "Tags" in the context menu of the column bar:

When you go through different files, you will recognize that not all file types can be tagged by default. For example, the details pane for a simple text file does not show the "Tags: Add a tag" in contrast to any JPEG image file as shown in the screen-shots above.

Assigned tags are visible in the details pane as well as in the tags column:

Adding or modifying tags is possible in the Details pane but not in the tags column. You will recognize that Microsoft allows tags with spaces and special characters. Multiple tags are usually separated by semicolons which is probably the only standard character which is not allowed within tags.

The last place where File Explorer is showing you the assigned tags Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version also allows to edit them is Aurora HDR 2020 Latest download free Archives the Properties of a file:

As shown in the screenshots above, tags might be added/removed/modified at two places: either on the "Details pane" (on the right hand side of the File Explorer window) or within the file properties on its "Details" tab.

How to Make Use of Tags

Now that we have tagged some files, what possibilities are there to use this meta-data in daily life? First of all, there is navigation. For navigating through your files, you might prefer your File Explorer sorted alphabetically by file name:

With tags, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, you might also sort alphabetically by tags instead:

Since the order of files in the "sorted by tags"-view is depending on the order of tags within the files, I do not consider this a great improvement. However, what is really neat is when you consider the "Group by"-method. Be default, File Explorer is grouping by names:

You can change the grouping in the "View" tab of the File Explorer:

Having switched to "Group by Tags", you will notice that all Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version are arranged by their assigned tags:

Untagged files are listed in the "Unspecified" category at the bottom. The categories above correspond to the alphabetically sorted list of tags. Each file is listed once for each tag. So if a file like does have two different tags ("Dogs" and "House"), it is listed twice. One time in the category "Dogs" and one time in the category "House". If you select it in one category, this single file gets selected in all categories.

Complementary to file navigation, File Explorer has a search feature implemented. The following image shows the result when you do search for a tag "house" within the folder we've used above:

You will notice that all files are listed in the results that do feature the tag "house" or "House". So search as well as "Group by Tags" is case insensitive when it comes to tags. All other files, not having the "house" tag, are omitted.

When you search for multiple tags, just the files that do contain all of them are listed:

On the negative side, you can not search for keywords that only occur within tags. I would have expected a query language according to the widespread pattern like "tag:dog" which would look for the occurrence of "dog" but only within the tags and not the file name or the content.

So if you're searching for "dog", you will find files that contain the tag dog as well as files that do contain "dog" within their file name:

This File Explorer tag search is not a sub-string search: if you want to find files tagged with "mydog", you can not find them by searching for "dog". However, when you have tagged files with "my dog", you will find them in the search results for "dog" but not within search results for "dogs".

In summary: Searching for tags is:

  • case-insensitive,
  • non-sub-string,
  • whole-word and not whole-tag.

Playing Around With Tags

When you play around with different tags, you will find out that this feature is intended to be used case-insensitive. When you cFosSpeed 10.27 serial number Archives a file with "Dog" and "dog", the last one wins and the other gets removed.

When "Arrange by Tags" is used, the tag "Dog" as well as "dog" gets listed in the category "Dog".

When you select multiple tagged files, the Details pane shows only the tags that can be found within all selected files. The other ones are not visualized. SourceOffSite Classic 3.5.2 crack serial keygen may add additional tags which then gets added to all selected files:

You may remove all tags of one or a set of selected files with "Properties → Details → Remove .".

This page mentions a context menu function to export the meta-data of selected files to an file. Meta-data from an file could be applied to the files as well. I was not able to find this function in my tests.

Enabled File Types for Tagging

In the previous sections I mentioned briefly that only a sub-set of file types may be tagged by default. In my opinion, this is a very tough restriction if you want to use tags for organizing your files.

On a fresh Windows 10 installation, there are not even a hundred file types that may be tagged. When apps get installed like Microsoft Office or LibreOffice, meta-data handlers for additional file formats gets added and configured. On my business Windows 10 system approximately 180 extensions had associated meta-data handlers. After installing LibreOffice on a Windows 10 virtual machine, about 120 extensions were listed as tag-able, approximately thirty of them from LibreOffice alone. I noticed that LibreOffice does not create meta-data handlers for Microsoft formats such as or whereas handler for older formats are created: or.

It is important to know that not all meta-data handlers offer meta-data tagging by keywords. Only meta-data handlers that contain definitions for "System.Keywords" result in the ability to be tagged. Furthermore, not all meta-data handlers that contains keywords/tags offer them also in file properties.

I tried to come up with a minimum list of activated tagging via meta-data handlers. When downloading a fresh Windows 10 virtual machine like that one, you will find some tools pre-installed. In this case, these are many development tools. After manually installing DotNet, LibreOffice 5.4.4, paint.net 4.2.5, all extensions with enabled handlers for keywords/tags are:

.asf .cr2 .crw .dng .doc .dot .dvr-ms .erf .flac .jfif .jpe .jpeg .jpg .jxr .kdc .m1v .m2t .m2ts .m2v .m4a .m4b .m4p .m4v .mka .mkv .mod .mov .mp2 .mp2v .mp4 .mp4v .mp3 .mpeg .mpg .mpv2 .mrw .msi .msp .mts .nef .nrw .pef .raf .raw .rw2 .rwl .sr2 .srw .tif .tiff .tod .ts .tts .uvu .vob .wdp .weba .webm .wma .wmv

I did not mention all well-known LibreOffice formats that were also in the list.

As you can see, most of these activated file types do not reflect bug relevance for the average user. Selected extensions that do not have handlers or no handlers that provide tagging:

.avi .docx .exe .gif .lnk .mp3 .png .wav .css .csv .epub .gz .html .json .java .txt .wmf .xhtml .xlsx .zip

Therefore, there are many file types which may be used on any given Windows machine that can not be tagged by default.

How to Enable Tags for More File Types

After we have found out that it would be nice to have more file formats enabled for tagging, how are we able to enable meta-data handlers ourselves?

The answer lies within a project called FileMeta. You can download the latest release on their release page. Installing this tool requires administration permissions. I totally recommend the documentation pages for learning about details on this topic in general.

After installing FileMeta, you will find multiple executables in its install directory: and.

Most things can also be done on the command line. For configuring the tagging functionality, we'll stick to the graphical for this article. After starting up the File Meta Association Manager you will see three main parts of the UI:

  1. Some workflows for manipulating on the left hand side,
  2. the File Extensions list with the handler associations and
  3. the meta-data related settings on the right hand side:

Extending the List of File Extensions

The list of the file extensions are read from the Windows registry. If you can not find a specific file extension in the File Meta Association Manager, no application has registered the file extension so far, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. If you do associate a file extension with an application ("Always open with ."), this does not create a registry entry. Therefore, associating an extension with an application is not sufficient that this extension gets listed in the File Meta Association Manager.

To add an extension not listed yet, you have to start the registry editor with administrator privileges, go to "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE" → "SOFTWARE" → "Classes" and choose "New → Key" from the context menu.

Then you can enter your new extension like, e.g., and confirm with the return key. After restarting the File Meta Association Manager you'll find the new extension in the pitstop pro 2020 Archives.

Pre-Defined Profiles

My File Meta Association Manager lists two pre-defined profiles: "Simple" and "OfficeDSOfile". The latter seems to be set up by LibreOffice. The "Simple" profile has a few properties set up for "Preview Panel", "Details tab in Properties" and "Info Tip":

Custom Profiles

If you would like to set up a new custom profile, you have to know:

  • Full details → Description "System.Keywords": necessary to see and edit tags in the preferences → Details tab.
  • The Preview Panel → "System.Keywords": necessary to see and edit tags in the Details pane.

You can't have Details pane Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version preferences Details tab. Both settings enable the tags shown in the column bar.

Therefore, a minimal custom profile for tagging where you can see the tags in the Details tab looks like that:

Such a profile results in Hitman Pro 3.8.0 Crack Archives File Explorer view like that, where you can edit tags in the preferences as well as in the Details tab:

Whenever you change meta-data handlers, you will probably going to restart the File Explorer via the "Restart Explorer" button of the File Meta Association Manager in order to apply changes.

After setting up a custom meta-data handler Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version file extensions, you can see them also in the command line tool :

c:\Program Files\File Metadata>FileMetaAssoc.exe -l .txt Simple File Meta Property Handler c:\Program Files\File Metadata>

Relations Between Applications and Meta-Data

As mentioned briefly before, some applications do create meta-data handlers for file extensions when being installed. For example, LibreOffice is creating handlers for their document formats as well as some formats from Microsoft such as or but not or.

Programs like LibreOffice Writer or Microsoft Word do provide meta-data within the preferences of an open document.

You are able to enter tags within the document properties:

These tags can now be seen in the file properties (Details tab) as well as in the tags column. Because of the missing "System.Keywords" in the profile for the "Preview Panel", the tags are not shown in the Details tab of the File Explorer:

Here is the File Meta Association Manager profile "LibreOffice property handler" as set up by LibreOffice:

It's interesting to see that the "LibreOffice property handler" is not visible in the File Meta Association Manager profiles. So I tried to overwrite the "LibreOffice property handler" with the "Simple" profile. To my surprise, this happened:

Yes, this makes sense after all. After confirming this dialogue, the File Meta Association Manager window was gone. I thought that this action was not successful and the app crashed. After restarting the application, I noticed the successfully merged profiles for the extension.

Unfortunately, in contrast to my expectations, there was no change: no tags visible in Preview page of File Explorer and tags in Details tab can not be changed, only viewed. So this was not a success after all: I still can not modify tags for LibreOffice Writer files outside of LibreOffice Writer file preferences although they can be seen in File Explorer.

So I started to create some non-native LibreOffice Writer documents: and. For files, there were no document property tags visible in File Explorer: not in Preview pane, not in tags column and not in the file properties, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version.

Different story with the files though: Here, the document property tags are synchronized with the NTFS meta-data. Whenever a tag is added or changed in the file properties, the same change appears in the LibreOffice Writer document properties and vice versa. However, there are no tags/keywords visible in the Preview pane.

This tag synchronization mechanism has a minor issue: when you do not create a file from within LibreOffice Writer or Microsoft Word but with a text editor, there is no within-file meta-data preferences yet. This results in an error message when you want to tag a zero byte file in File Explorer:

When you do select "New → Excel Spreadsheet" in File Explorer with Microsoft Office installed, it does not create a zero byte file as with Word files using the same method. Instead, it fills the spreadsheet file with a seven kilobyte default content. This way, you won't get this error message for Excel files in this situation.

Related to this, you can read on the FileMeta FAQ for PDF files:

If I add the File Meta Property Handler for PDF files, will I see properties already in those files? No, unless you are using version 1.4 and are extending an existing property handler for PDF files. File Meta has no capability otherwise for reading properties held within the PDF formatted part of the file. File Meta always writes properties in an NTFS-provided annex to the file. Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version The bad news is that File Meta before version 1.4 will not read properties held in the type-specific formatted part of a file, and no version of File Meta will update such properties.

To make this even more complicated, you have to know that Windows supports tags for every file type, internally. Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version will not be visible in the properties section of that file, but when you search for those tags, the file appears in search results.

After all these experiences I can only sum up my experience with: it's very complicated. The end-user can not expect tags/keywords to be visible in the File Explorer. She is Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version able to know if document preference keywords are synchronized to the NTFS meta-data. If there are tags visible, they may not be able to be managed on the Preview pane or the file preferences. File Explorer search seems to find all keywords so far. However, you don't know that a specific file was found because of a tag or anything else since this visualization is missing.

History, Implementation Details, and Similar Implementations

You can read about the history of this feature and some technical details on this page. Basically, NTFS stores the meta-data within an Alternate data streams (ADS). This is quite similar to how Apple stored meta-data in HFS+ and probably also within AFS, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. I was using the color labels of OS X up to Leopard. They ended up as file-system based meta-data as well.

You can read on this Wikipedia article:

In Apple's macOS, the operating system has allowed users to assign multiple arbitrary tags as extended file attributes to any file or folder ever since OS X 10.9 was released in 2013, and before that time the open-source OpenMeta standard provided similar tagging functionality in macOS.

Windows 10 Tags Considered as Fragile

I do think that the Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version reader does agree that using tags with this Windows 10 feature is a drag from the user experience point of view already. I do have sad news: this now even gets worse.

Since meta-data are stored in NTFS data streams, you are losing all of the tags when files get moved to someplace where there are Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version NTFS data streams or when applications generating files do not respect them properly. As a consequence, there are many possibilities where meta-data gets lost. Here is a list of the most obvious ones.

  1. Losing meta-data when copying to a thumb drive
    • Copying a tagged file to a drive that is not formatted with NTFS results in a silent loss of the meta-data. Thumb drives usually are formatted with FAT32.
  2. Losing meta-data when sending them via email
    • When you attach a tagged file to an email, the meta-data does not get attached as well.
  3. Losing meta-data because of applications handling temporary files
    • When you open a file in too many Windows applications, new modifications by the user get written to a temporary file. On saving the changes to the file, this temporary file then gets renamed to the original file name, overwriting the previous file as well as the meta-data. This is a very mean behavior since users would never expect to lose meta-data just by saving a file.
  4. Losing meta-data when doing backup
    • When you back up your data, the backup application needs to save and restore meta-data within ADS properly. I did not investigate this issue but my gut feelings are that only a fraction of the tools on the market do consider ADS meta-data and handle them accordingly.

Summary and Remarks

After being enthusiastic when I found out that Microsoft provides a native file tagging ecosystem with Windows, I had to take a closer look. This enthusiasm was replaced by a disillusion. Everything related to file tagging is hidden from the common user by default. Enabling it results in manual labor not only for the UI but also for each and every file extension separately. Although there are some nice retrieval features for navigation, search does not differ between keywords in tags and keywords anywhere else. It is not entirely clear to me how file-format-specific tags interact with the NTFS tags. Finally, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, when you did invest some time for tagging files, there is a high chance of losing all this meta-data sometimes without even realizing it.

If Microsoft would act in KeyShot Pro 8.2.80 activation key Archives way that somebody would be thinking that this tagging feature is ready for production, it would qualify for my bad design decisions series. For me personally, I'd never invest anything in using this feature mainly because of the many ways of losing meta-data without noticing. My current approach for tagging is described on this article. It's an OS-independent and app-independent method with very nice features like TagTrees you can not find elsewhere.

If you would like to get an overview on other non-file-system-based tagging solutions, you can read the bachelor thesis "Marktübersicht von Tagging-Werkzeugen und Vergleich mit tagstore" which can be downloaded at the tagstore page, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. It's in German language and it reflects the situation of the year 2013.

Before writing this article I needed to implement a necessary feature for my blogging system beforehand. With this, you are now able to click on the screenshot previews to see them with their original size. So this article was in my personal pipe-line for over a year. As a consequence, early findings and screen shots from 2018 are based on whereas the most current ones from 2019 are based on.

Congratulations for following this very long blog article until its end. I hope I could teach you something on Windows 10 functions and help you decide on its usefulness for your situation. Drop me a line in the comments below when you do have some questions or remarks.

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File Explorer

file manager application that is included with releases of the Microsoft Windows operating system

This article is about the Microsoft Windows file listing browser. For exploring file system listings, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, see file browser. For exploring inside files, see file viewer.

"Windows Explorer" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Windows Internet Explorer.

File Explorer, previously known as Windows Explorer, is a file manager application that is included with releases of Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version Microsoft Windowsoperating system from Windows 95 onwards. It provides a graphical user interface for accessing the file systems. It is also the component of the operating system that presents many user interface items on the screen such as the taskbar and desktop. Controlling the computer is possible without Windows Explorer running (for example, the File ▸ Run command in Task Manager on NT-derived versions of Windows will function without it, as will commands typed in a command prompt window).

Overview[edit]

Windows Explorer was first included with Windows 95 as a replacement for File Manager, which came with all versions of Windows 3.x operating systems. Explorer could be accessed by double-clicking the new My Computer desktop icon or launched from the new Start Menu that replaced the earlier Program Manager. There is also a shortcut key combination: +. Successive versions of Windows (and in some cases, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, Internet Explorer) introduced new features and Avast Internet Security 2016 Full Version Download, removed other features, and generally progressed from being a simple file system navigation tool into a task-based file management system.

While "Windows Explorer" or "File Explorer" is a term most commonly used to describe the file management aspect of the operating system, the Explorer process also houses the operating system's search functionality and File Type associations (based on filename extensions), and is responsible for displaying the desktopicons, the Start Menu, the Taskbar, and the Control Panel. Collectively, these features are known as the Windows shell.

After a user logs in, the explorer process is created by the userinit process. Userinit performs some initialization of the user environment (such as running the login script and applying group policies) and then looks in the registry at the Shell value and creates a process to run the system-defined shell BullGuard Antivirus 2020 keygen Archives by default, Explorer.exe. Then Userinit exits. This is why Explorer.exe is shown by various process explorers with no parent – its parent has exited.

History[edit]

In 1995, Microsoft first released test versions of a shell refresh, named the Shell Technology Preview, and often referred to informally as "NewShell".[3] The update was designed to replace the Windows 3.x Program Manager/File Manager based shell with Windows Explorer. The release provided capabilities quite similar to that of the Windows "Chicago" (codename for Windows 95) shell during its late beta phases, however was intended to be nothing more than a test release.[4] There were two public releases of the Shell Technology Preview, made available to MSDN and CompuServe users: May 26, 1995 and August 8, 1995. Both held Windows Explorer builds of 3.51.1053.1. The Shell Technology Preview program never saw a final release under NT 3.51. The entire program was moved across to the Cairo development group who finally integrated the new shell design into the NT code with the release of NT 4.0 in July 1996.

Windows 98 and Windows Desktop Update[edit]

With the release of the Windows Desktop Update (packaged with Internet Explorer 4 as an optional component, and included in Windows 98), Windows Explorer became "integrated" with Internet Explorer, most notably with the addition of navigation arrows (back and forward) for moving between recently visited directories, as well as Internet Explorer's Favorites menu.

An address bar was also added to Windows Explorer, which a user could type in directory paths directly, and be taken to that folder.

Another feature that was based on Internet Explorer technology was customized folders. Such folders contained a hidden web page that controlled the way the Windows Explorer displayed the contents IObit Uninstaller PRO Crack 10.3.0.13 With Key Free Download 2021 the folder.

Windows ME and Windows 2000[edit]

The integrated media player in Windows Explorer in Windows 2000playing a MIDIsequence on Media folder.

The "Web-style" folders view, with the left Explorer pane displaying details for the object currently selected, is turned on by default. For certain file types, such as pictures and media files, a preview is also displayed in the left pane.[5] The Windows 2000 Explorer featured an interactive media player as the previewer for sound and video files, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. However, such a previewer can be enabled in Windows ME through the use of folder customization templates.[6] Windows Explorer in Windows 2000 and Windows ME allows for custom thumbnail previewers and tooltip handlers. The default file tooltip displays file title, author, subject and comments;[7] this metadata may be read from a special NTFS stream, if the file is on an NTFS volume, or from a COM Structured Storage stream, if the file is a structured storage document. All Microsoft Office documents since Office 95[8] make use of structured storage, so their metadata is displayable in the Windows 2000 Explorer default tooltip. File shortcuts can also store comments which are displayed as a tooltip when the mouse hovers over the shortcut.

The right-hand pane, which usually just lists files and folders, can also be customized. For example, the contents of the system folders aren't displayed by default, instead showing in the right pane a warning to the user that modifying the contents of the system folders could harm their computer. It's possible to define additional Explorer panes by using DIV elements in folder template files.[9] This feature was abused by computer viruses that employed malicious scripts, Java applets, or ActiveX controls in folder template files as Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version infection vector. Two such viruses are VBS/Roor-C[10] and VBS.Redlof.a.[11]

Other Explorer UI elements that can be customized include columns in "Details" view, icon overlays, and search providers: the new DHTML-based search pane is integrated into Windows 2000 Explorer, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, unlike the separate search dialog found in all previous Explorer versions.[12]

Search capabilities were added, offering full-text searches of documents, with options to filter by date (including arbitrary ranges like "modified within the last week"), size, and file type. The Indexing Service has also been integrated into the operating system and the search pane built into Explorer allows searching files indexed by its database.[13] The ability to customize the standard buttons was also added.

Windows XP and Windows Server 2003[edit]

Windows Explorer in Windows XP, showing All Users folder contents.

There were significant changes made to Windows Explorer in Windows XP, both visually and functionally. Microsoft focused especially on making Explorer more discoverable and task-based, as well as adding several new features to reflect the growing use of a computer as a digital hub.

Windows Explorer in Windows Server 2003 contains all the same features as Windows XP, but the task panes and search companion are disabled by default.

Task pane[edit]

The task pane is displayed on the left-hand side of the window instead of the traditional folder tree view, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. It presents the user with a list of common actions and destinations that are relevant to the current directory or file(s) selected. For instance, when in a directory containing mostly pictures, a set of "Picture tasks" is shown, offering the options to display these pictures as a slide show, to print them out, or to go online to order prints. Conversely, a folder containing music files would offer options to play those files in a media player or to go online to purchase music. Windows XP had a Media bar but it was removed with SP1. The Media Bar was only available with Windows XP RTM.

Every folder also has "File and Folder Tasks", offering options to create new folders, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version a folder on the local network, publish files or folders to a website, and other common tasks like copying, renaming, moving, and deleting files or folders. File types that have identified themselves as being printable also have an option listed to print the file.

Underneath "Other Places" is a "Details" pane which gives additional information – typically file size and date, but depending on the file type, a thumbnail preview, author, image dimensions, or other details.

The "Folders" button on the Windows Explorer toolbar toggles between the traditional tree view of folders, and the task pane. Users can get rid of the task pane or restore it using the sequence: Tools – Folder Options – General – Show Common Tasks/Use Windows Classic Folders.

Search companion[edit]

Windows Explorer's default Search Companion, Rover in Windows XP

Microsoft introduced animated "Search Companions" in an attempt to make searching more engaging and friendly; the default character is a puppy named Rover (previously used in Microsoft Bob), with three other characters (Merlin the magician, Earl the surfer, and Courtney) also available. These search companions use the same technology as Microsoft Office's Office Assistants, even incorporating "tricks" and sound effects, and they can be used as Office Assistants if their files are copied into the C:\Windows\msagent\chars folder.[14]

The search capability itself is fairly similar to Windows ME and Windows 2000, with one major addition: Search can also be instructed to search only files that are categorical "Documents" or "Pictures, music and video"; this feature is noteworthy largely because of how Windows determines what types of files can be classified under these categories. In order to maintain a relevant list of file types, Windows Explorer connects to Microsoft and downloads a set of XML files that define what these file types are. The Search Companion can be disabled in favor of the classic search pane used in Windows 2000 by using the Tweak UI applet from Microsoft's PowerToys for Windows XP, or by manually editing the registry.

Image handling[edit]

Windows XP improves image preview in Explorer by offering a Filmstrip view. "Back" and "Previous" buttons facilitate navigation through the pictures, and a pair of "Rotate" buttons offer 90-degree clockwise and counter-clockwise (lossy)[citation needed] rotation of images. Aside from the Filmstrip view mode, there is a 'Thumbnails' mode, which displays thumbnail-sized images in the folder. A Folder containing images will also show thumbnails of four of the images from that folder overlaid on top of a large folder icon.

Web publishing[edit]

Web sites that offer image hosting services can be plugged into Windows Explorer, which the user can use to select images on their computer, and have them uploaded correctly without dealing with comparatively complex solutions involving FTP or web interfaces.[citation needed]

Other changes[edit]

  • Explorer gained the ability to understand the metadata of a number of types of files. For example, with images from a digital camera, Xilisoft iPhone Magic Platinum 5.7.34 Crack With Serial Key 2021 (Latest) Exif information can be viewed, both in the Properties pages for the photo itself, as well as via optional additional Details View columns.
  • A Tile view mode was added, which displays the file's icon in a larger size (48 × 48), and places the file name, descriptive type, and additional information (typically the file size for data files, and the publisher name for applications) to the right.
  • The Details view also presented an additional option called "Show in Groups" which allows the Explorer to separate its contents by headings based on the field which is used to sort the items.
  • The taskbar can be locked to prevent it from accidentally being moved.
  • Windows Explorer also gained the ability to burn CDs and DVD-RAM discs in Windows XP.
  • Ability to create and open ZIP files called "compressed folders".[15][16]
  • Ability to open Cabined (.cab) files.[17]
  • If a or file is copied or moved, the accompanying suffix folder is copied or moved among it automatically.[18]

Removed and changed features[edit]

[icon]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (December 2012)

See also: List of features removed in Windows XP § Windows Explorer

  • The sort order has changed compared to the one in Windows 2000. For file names containing numbers Windows Explorer now tries to sort based on numerical value rather than just comparing each number digit by digit.[19]

Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008[edit]

Windows Explorer in Windows Vista, showing Public folder contents.

Search, organizing and metadata[edit]

Windows Explorer includes significant changes from previous versions of Windows such as improved filtering, sorting, grouping and stacking. Combined with integrated desktop search, Windows Explorer allows users to find and organize their files in new ways, such as stacks.[20][21] The new Stacks viewing mode groups files according to the criterion specified by the user.[21] Stacks can be clicked to filter the files shown in Windows Explorer. There is also the ability to save searches as virtual folders or search folders.[22] A search folder is simply an XML file, which stores the query in a form that can be used by the Windows search subsystem.[23] When accessed, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, the search is executed and the results are aggregated and presented as a virtual folder.[22] Windows Vista includes six Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version folders by default: recent documents, recent e-mail, recent music, recent pictures and videos, recent changed, and "Shared by Me".[24] Additionally, search operators for properties were introduced, such as. [25] Since at least Windows 7, comparison operators "greater than" and "less than" are supported to search for any supported attribute such as date ranges and file sizes, like to search for all files that are greater than 100MB.[26] Attributes sortable and searchable in Windows Explorer include pictures' dimensions, Exif data such as aperture and exposure, video duration and framerate and width.[27]

When sorting items, the sort order no longer remains consistently Ascending or Descending. Each property has a preferred sort direction. For example, sort by date defaults to descending order, as does size. But name and type default to ascending order.

Searching for files containing a given text string became problematic with Vista unless the files had been indexed. An alternative is to use the findstr command-line function.[28] After right-clicking on a folder one can open a command-line prompt in that folder.

Windows Explorer also contains modifications in the visualization of files on a computer. A new addition to Windows Explorer in Vista and Server 2008 is the details pane, which displays metadata and information relating to the currently selected file or folder. The details pane will also display a thumbnail of the file or an icon of the filetype if the file does not contain visual information. Furthermore, different imagery is overlaid on thumbnails to give more information about the file, such as a picture frame around the thumbnail of an image file, or a filmstrip on a video file.

The details pane also allows for the change of some textual metadata such as author and title in files that support them within Windows Explorer. A new type of metadata called tags allows users to add descriptive terms to documents for easier categorization and retrieval. Some files support open metadata, allowing users to define new types of metadata for their files. Out-of-the-box, Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 supports Microsoft Office documents and most audio and video files. Support for other file types can however be added by writing Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version software to retrieve the metadata at the shell's request. Metadata stored in a file's alternate data stream only on NTFS volumes cannot be viewed and edited through the summary tab of the file's properties anymore. Instead, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, all metadata is stored inside the file, so that it will always travel with the file and not be dependent on the file system.[29]

Layout and icons[edit]

Windows Explorer in Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 also introduces a new layout. The task panes from Windows XP are replaced with a toolbar on top and a navigation pane on the left. The navigation pane contains commonly accessed folders and preconfigured search folders. Eight different views are available to view files and folders, including extra large, large, medium, small, list, details, tiles, and content. In addition, column headers now appear in all icon viewing modes,[21] unlike Windows XP where they only appear in the details icon viewing mode.[20] File and folder actions such as cut, copy, paste, undo, redo, delete, rename and properties are built into a dropdown menu which appears when the Organize button is clicked. It is also possible to change the layout of the Explorer window by using the Organize button. Users can select whether to display classic menus, a search pane, a preview pane, a reading pane, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, and the navigation pane. The preview pane enables users to preview files (e.g., documents Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version media files) without opening them. If an application, such as Office 2007, installs preview handlers for file types, then these files can also be edited within the preview pane itself.[30]

Windows Vista saw the introduction of the Prota structure 2020 software keygen,serial,crack,generator bar for easier navigation. As opposed to the prior address bar which displayed the current folder in a simple editable combobox, this new style structures the path into clickable levels of folder hierarchy (though falls back to the classic edit mode when a blank area is clicked), enabling the user to skip as many levels as desired in one click rather than repeatedly clicking "Up". It is also possible to navigate to any subfolder of the current folder using the arrow to the right of the last item. The menu bar is now hidden by default but reappears temporarily when the user presses Alt.

Check boxes in Windows Explorer allow the selection of multiple files.[31] Free and used space on all drives is shown in horizontal indicator bars. Icons of various sizes are supported: 16 x 16, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, 24 x 24, 32 x 32, 48 x 48, 64 x 64, 96 x 96, 128 x 128 and 256 x 256. Windows Explorer can zoom the icons in and out using a slider or by holding down the Ctrl key and using the mouse scrollwheel.[32] Live icons can display the content of folders and files themselves rather than generic icons.[33]

Other changes[edit]

With the release of Windows Vista and Server 2008 and Windows Internet Explorer 7 for Windows XP, Internet Explorer RegDoctor v1.53 crack serial keygen no longer integrated with Windows Explorer. In Windows Vista and Server 2008 (and in Windows XP Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version well if IE7 or 8 is installed), Windows Explorer no longer displays web pages, and IE7 does not support use as a file manager, although one will separately launch the other as necessary.

When moving or copying files from one folder to another, if two files have the same name, an option is now available to rename the file; in previous versions of Windows, the user was prompted to choose either a replacement or cancel moving the file. Also, when renaming a file, Explorer only highlights the filename without selecting the extension. Renaming multiple files is quicker as pressing Tab automatically renames the existing file or folder and opens the file name text field for the next file for renaming. Shift+Tab allows renaming in the same manner upwards.

Support for burning data on DVDs (DVD±R, DVD±R DL, DVD±R RW) in addition to CDs and DVD-RAM using version 2.0 of the Image Mastering API, as well as Live File System support was added.[34]

If a file is in use by another application, Windows Explorer tells users to close the application and retry the file operation. Also, a new interface IFileIsInUse is introduced into the API which developers can use to let other applications switch to the main window of the application that has the file open or simply close the file from the "File in Use" dialog. If the running application exposes these operations by means of the IFileIsInUse interface, Windows Explorer, upon encountering a locked file, allows the user to close the file or switch to the application from the dialog box itself.[35]

Windows Vista introduced precluded support for the Media Transfer Protocol.[citation needed]

Removed and changed features[edit]

See also: List of features removed in Windows Vista

The ability to Quick Heal Antivirus Pro Crack With Keygen + Serial Code Free Download the layout and buttons on the toolbars has been removed in Windows Vista's Explorer, as has the ability to add a password to a zip file (compressed folder). The Toolbar button in Explorer to go up one folder from the current folder has been removed (the function still exists however, one can move up a folder by pressing + ). Although still fully available from the menus and keyboard shortcuts, toolbar buttons for Cut, Copy, Paste, Undo, Delete, Properties and some others are no longer available. The Menu Bar is also hidden by default but is still available by pressing the Alt key or changing its visibility in the layout options. Several other features are removed such as showing the size on the status Disk Drill Pro 4.0.533.0 Crack Archives Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version selecting items, storing metadata in NTFS alternate data streams,[36] the IColumnProvider interface which allowed addition of custom columns to Explorer[37] and folder background customization using desktop.ini, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version.

The option "Managing pairs of Web pages and folders" is also removed, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, and the user has no way of telling Vista that a .html file and the folder with the same name that was created when saving a complete web page from IE should be treated separately, that is, they cannot delete the folder without deleting the html file as well.[38]

The ability to right-click a folder and hit "Search" was removed in Windows Vista Service Pack 1. Users must open the folder they wish to search in and enter their keywords in the search field located on the top right corner of the window, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Alternatively, users can specify other Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version parameters through the "Advanced Search" UI, which can be accessed by clicking on the Organize Bar and selecting Search Pane under the Layout submenu. Pressing F3 also opens the "Advanced Search" interface.

Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2[edit]

Windows Explorer in Windows 7, showing Libraries.

Libraries[edit]

Windows Explorer in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 supports libraries, virtual folders described in a file that aggregates content from various locations – including shared folders on networked systems if the shared folder has been indexed by the host system – and present them in a unified view. Searching Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version a library automatically federates the query to the remote systems, in addition to searching on the local system, so that files on the remote systems are also searched. Unlike search folders, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, Libraries are backed by a physical location which allows files to be saved in the libraries. Such files are transparently saved in the backing physical folder. The default save location for a library may be configured by the user, as can the default view layout for each library. Libraries are generally stored in the libraries special folder, which allows them to be displayed on the navigation pane.

By default, a new user account in Windows 7 contains four libraries, for different file types: Documents, Music, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, Pictures, and Videos. They are configured to include the user's profile folders for these respective file types, as well as the computer's corresponding Public folders, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version.

In addition to aggregating multiple storage locations, Libraries enable Arrangement Views and Search Filter Suggestions. Arrangement Views allow users Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version pivot their views of the library's contents based on metadata. For example, selecting the "By Month" view in the Pictures library will display photos in stacks, where each stack represents a month of photos based on the date they were taken. In the Music library, the "By Artist" view will display stacks of albums from the artists in their collections, and browsing into an artist stack will then display the relevant albums.

Search Filter Suggestions are a new feature of the Windows 7 and Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version Server 2008 R2 Explorer's search box. When the user clicks in the search box, a menu shows up below it showing recent searches as well as suggested Advanced Query Syntax filters that the user can type. When one is selected (or typed in manually), the menu will update to show the possible values to filter by for that property, and this list is based on the current location and other parts of the query already typed. For example, selecting the "tags" filter or typing "tags:" into the search box will display the list of possible tag values which will return search results.

The metadata written within the file, implemented in Vista, is also utilized in Windows 7. This can sometimes lead to long wait times displaying the contents of a folder. For example, if a folder contains many large video files totaling hundreds of gigabytes, and the Window Explorer pane is in Details view mode showing a property contained within the metadata (for example Date, Length, Frame Height), Windows Explorer might have to search the contents of the whole file for the meta data, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Some damaged files can cause a prolonged delay as well. This is due to metadata information being able to be placed anywhere within the file, beginning, middle, or end, necessitating a search of the whole file. Lengthy delays also occur when displaying the contents of a folder with many different types of program icons, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. The icon is contained in the metadata. Some programs cause the activation of a virus scan when retrieving the icon information from the metadata, hence producing a lengthy delay.[29]

Arrangement Views and Search Filter Suggestions are database-backed features that require that all locations in the Library be indexed by the Windows Search service. Local disk locations must be indexed by the local indexer, and Windows Explorer will automatically add locations to the indexing scope when they are included in a library. Remote locations can be indexed by the indexer on another Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 machine, on a Windows machine running Windows Search 4 (such as Windows Vista or Windows Home Server), or on another device that implements the MS-WSP remote query protocol.[39]

Federated search[edit]

Windows Explorer also supports federating search to external data sources, such as custom databases or web services, that are exposed over the web and described via an OpenSearch definition. The federated location description Adobe Photoshop CC 2021 Crack (v22.0.1.73) Download a Search Connector) is provided as a file. Once installed, the data source becomes queryable directly from Windows Explorer. Windows Explorer features, such as previews and thumbnails, work with the results of a federated search as well.

Other changes[edit]

  • Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 support showing icons in the context menu and creating cascaded context menus with static verbs in submenus using the Registry instead of a shell extension.[40]
  • The search box in the Explorer window and the address bar can be resized.
  • Certain folders in the navigation pane can be hidden to reduce clutter.
  • Progress bars and overlay icons on an application's button on the taskbar.
  • Content view which shows thumbnails and metadata.
  • Buttons to toggle the preview pane and create a new folder.

Removed or changed features[edit]

See also: List of features removed in Windows 7 § Windows Explorer

In Windows 7, several features have been removed from Windows Explorer, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, including the collapsible folder pane, overlay icon for shared items, remembering individual folder window sizes and positions, free disk space on the status bar, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, icons on the command bar, ability to disable Auto Arrange and Align to Grid, sortable column headings in other views except details view, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, ability to disable full row selection in details view, automatic horizontal scrolling and scrollbar in the navigation pane and maintaining selection when sorting from the Edit menu.

Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012[edit]

The file manager on Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 is renamed File Explorer and introduces new features such as a redesigned interface incorporating a ribbon toolbar, and a redesigned file operation dialog that displays more detailed progress and allows for file operations to be paused and resumed, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. The details pane from Windows Vista and 7 was removed and replaced with a narrower pane with no icons and fewer detail columns. But other details are displayed by hovering over the file's name.[41][42]

Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016[edit]

The icons in File Explorer have been redesigned. They are flatter and simpler in design. The window border padding is thinner than previous Cookie Policy - Kali Software Crack. Windows 10 Creators Update and later versions come with a Tipard Video Converter Ultimate 10.2.8 Crack Free Download [2021] Universal File Explorer (also known as the UWP File Explorer), Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Although hidden, it can be opened by creating a shortcut pointing to "explorer shell:AppsFolder\c5e2524a-ea46-4f67-841f-6a9465d9d515_cw5n1h2txyewy!App" [43][44]

Windows 10, version 1809 and Windows Server 2019[edit]

A "dark mode" has been added to File Explorer in Windows 10, version 1809 and Windows Server 2019.[45] The Universal File Explorer also includes new features.[46][47]

Windows 10, version 1909[edit]

Windows Search and OneDrive have been integrated into File Explorer's search feature in Windows 10, version 1909.[48]

Windows 11[edit]

In Windows 11, the File Explorer has undergone significant Edraw Max 11.1.1 Crack 2D/3D Full License Key {100% Working} revisions, with the ribbon interface introduced with Windows 8 being replaced with a new command bar. Translucency, shadows, and rounded geometry have also been added, following the Fluent Design System.[49][50][51][52][53]

Extensibility[edit]

File Explorer can be extended to support non-default functionality by means of Windows shell extensions, which are COM objects that plug the extended functionality into Windows Explorer.[54] Shell extensions can be in the form of shell extension handlers, toolbars or even namespace extensions that allow certain folders (or even non-filesystem objects such as the images scanned by a scanner) to be presented as a special folder, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. File Explorer also allows metadata for files to be added as NTFSalternate data streams, separate from the data stream for the file.

Shell extension handlers are queried by the shell beforehand for modifying the action the shell takes. They can be associated on a per file type – where they will show up only when a particular action takes place on a particular file type – or on a global basis – which are always available. The shell supports the following extension handlers:

Handler Description Can be implemented on Required shell version
Context menu handler Adds menu items to the context menu. It is called before the context menu is displayed. Per file type Windows 95 and later. Windows 7 introduced IExecuteCommand
Drag-and-drop handler Controls the action upon right-click drag and drop and modifies the context menu that appears. Global Windows 95 and later
Drop target handler Controls the action after a data object is dragged and dropped over a drop target such as a file. Per file type Windows 95 and later
Data object handler Controls the action after a file is copied to the clipboard or dragged and dropped over a drop target. It can provide additional clipboard formats to the drop target. Per file type Windows 95 and later
Icon handler Assigns a custom icon to an individual file amongst a class of file types. It is called before file icons are displayed. Per file type Windows 95 and later
Property sheet handler Replaces or adds pages to the property sheet dialog box of an object. Per file type Windows 95 and later
Copy hook handler Allows running, modifying or denying the action when a user or application tries to copy, move, delete, or rename an object. Not associated with a file typeWindows 95 and later
Search handler Allows shell integration of a custom search engine. Not associated with a file typeWindows 95 through Windows XP
Infotip handler Allows retrieving flags and infotip information for an item and displaying it inside a popup tooltip upon mouse hover. Per file type Windows Desktop Update and later
Thumbnail image handler Provides for a thumbnail image to be generated and displayed along with its alpha type when a file is selected or the thumbnail view is activated. Per file type Windows Desktop Update and later. Windows Vista introduced a newer IThumbnailProvider interface that also shows thumbnails in the Details pane. The older IExtractImage is still supported but not in the Details pane.[55]
Disk Cleanup handler Add a new entry to the Disk Cleanup application and allows specifying additional disk locations or files to clean up. Per folder Windows 98 and later
Column handler Allows creating and displaying custom columns in Windows Explorer details view. It can be used to extend sorting and grouping. Per folder Windows 2000 and later
Icon overlay handler Allows displaying an overlay icon over a shell object (a file or folder icon). Per file type Windows 2000 and later
Metadata handler Allows viewing and modifying metadata stored in a file. It can be used to extend details view columns, infotips, property pages, sorting and grouping. Per file type Windows 2000 and later
Filter handler (IFilter) Allows file properties and its contents to be indexed and searched by Indexing Service or Windows SearchPer file type Windows 2000 and later
AutoPlay handler Examines newly discovered removable media and devices and, based on content such as pictures, music or video files, launches an appropriate application to play or display the content. Per file type category
Windows XP only: per device and per file type category
Windows XP and later
Property handler Allows viewing and modifying system-defined and custom properties of a file. Per file type Windows Vista and later; on Windows XP if Windows Search is installed.
Preview handler Renders enhanced previews of items without launching the default application when a file is selected. It can also provide file type-specific navigation such as browsing a document, or seeking inside a media file, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Per file type Windows Vista and later

Namespace extensions are used by Explorer and Common Dialogs to either display some data – which are not necessarily persisted as files – in a folder-like view or to present data in a way that is different from their organization on the file system. This feature can be exploited by a any hierarchical data source that can be represented as a file system like the Windows one, including Cloud-based implementation. Special folders, such as My Computer and Network Places in Windows Explorer are implemented this way, as are Explorer views that let items in a mobile phone or digital camera be explored. Source-control systems that use Explorer to browse source repositories also use Namespace extensions to allow Explorer to browse the revisions. To implement a namespace extension, the, and interfaces need to be implemented and registered. The implementation needs to provide the logic for navigating the data store as well as describing the presentation. Windows Explorer will instantiate the COM objects as required.[56]

While Windows Explorer natively exposes the extensibility points as COMinterfaces. NET Framework can also be used to write some types of extensions, using the COM Interop functionality of .NET Framework.[56] While Microsoft itself makes available extensions – such as the photo info tool[57] – which are authored using .NET Framework, they currently recommend against writing managed shell extensions, as only one instance of the CLR (prior to version 4.0) can be loaded per-process. This behavior will cause conflicts if multiple managed add-ins, targeting different versions of the CLR, are attempted to be run simultaneously.[58][59]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^"November 9, 2021—KB5007215 (OS Build 22000.318)". Microsoft Support. November 9, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, 2021.
  2. ^"Announcing Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22504". Windows Insider Blog. November 17, 2021.
  3. ^Lineback, Nathan. "Misc Windows". toastytech.com. Archived from the original on July 3, 2018. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  4. ^John D. Ruley (September 1995). "NT Gets the Look But Not the Logo". How-To Columns. WinMag. Archived from the original on March 14, 2006. Retrieved September 4, 2009. Internet Archive
  5. ^"Managing Files, Folders, and Search Methods: Microsoft TechNet", Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. microsoft.com. Archived from the original on January 12, 2009. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  6. ^"Serenity Macros Home Page – Resources for MS Word". www.mvps.org. Archived from the original on June 27, 2018, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  7. ^Windows 2000 Registry: Latest Features and APIs Provide the Power to Customize and Extend Your Apps, MSDN Magazine, November 2000, archived from the original on April 15, 2003, retrieved August 26, 2007
  8. ^"COM Objects and Structured Storage"Archived 2018-12-18 at the Wayback Machine, Windows Dev Center, May 31, 2018
  9. ^Esposito, Dino (June 2000), More Windows 2000 UI Goodies: Extending Explorer Views by Customizing Hypertext Template Files, MSDN Magazine, archived from the original on August 24, 2007, retrieved August 26, 2007
  10. ^Sophos, VBS/Roor-C threat analysisArchived 2007-11-30 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed August 26, 2007.
  11. ^"Virus.VBS.Redlof.a", Virus Encyclopedia, Viruslist.com, January 15, 2004, archived from the original on October 28, 2007, retrieved August 26, 2007
  12. ^Figure 1 Windows Shell Extensions, MSDN Magazine, June 2000, archived from the original on August 31, 2004, retrieved August 26, 2007
  13. ^"What is Indexing Service?". msdn.microsoft.com. Archived from the original on January 1, 2011. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  14. ^"Is Microsoft Office 2003 still decent for general use on Windows 7, 8.1 and 10". answers.microsoft.com. Archived from the original on February 7, 2016, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  15. ^"Windows XP – What's new with files and Proxima FontExpert 2021 18.0 Release 4 Crack Full Version Download. Windows. Microsoft. Archived from the original on May 23, 2007.
  16. ^How to create and extract a Zip File in Windows ME/XP/2003
  17. ^How To: Open a Cab file – Quote: "If you're using Windows XP or Windows Vista, then your operating system has built-in support for opening Cab files."
  18. ^"Moving web pages saved by IE (HTM file & _FILES folder)". Directory Opus Resource Centre. 4 May 2009. Archived from the original on 16 December 2020. Retrieved 16 December 2020.
  19. ^The sort order for files and folders whose names contain numerals is different in Windows Vista, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 than it is in Windows 2000, support.microsoft.com, August 28, 2007, archived from the original on September 27, 2010, retrieved July 6, 2009
  20. ^ abShultz, Greg (August 10, 2006). "Examine the filtering, grouping, and stacking features in Windows Vista's Windows Explorer". TechRepublic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 22, 2015. Retrieved December 19, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, 2015.
  21. ^ abcReid, Rory (January 30, 2007). "Seven days of Vista -- day 4: Stacking and filtering". CNET. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 22, 2015. Retrieved December 19, 2015.
  22. ^ abKaelin, Mark (July 17, 2007). "How do I. Save and refine desktop searches in Microsoft Windows Vista?". TechRepublic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 11, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, 2015.
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  24. ^Bentz, Ben (October 31, 2006). "Query Composition: Building a search upon another search". Shell: Revealed Blog. Microsoft. Archived from the original on December 15, 2006. Retrieved December 21, 2015.
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External links[edit]

  • Sullivan, Kent. "The Windows 95 User Interface: A Case Study in Usability Engineering" (1996) for Association for Computing Machinery. (Sullivan was a developer on the Windows 95 UI team)
  • How To Customize the Windows Explorer Views in Windows XP
  • MSDN: Creating Shell Extension Handlers, Windows Dev Center, May 31, 2018
  • The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Shell Extensions, by Michal Dunn, March 15, 2006
  • Namespace extensions – the undocumented Windows Shell, by Henk Devos, November 30, 1999
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The 17 Best Free Search Tools for Windows 10

Have you ever searched for a program, file, or folder only to discover that the system search takes longer to find results than it does just to find them manually yourself? I'd imagine most Windows users face this dilemma, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version.

While there have always been some neat Windows Search tips and tricks, it has never been on par with the search features of Mac or Linux, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Although Windows 10 did lessen the gap in many ways, it's still slow and imperfect. In fact, you may be better off switching to one of these free Windows third-party search tools instead.

1. Everything

Everything is Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version lauded as one of the fastest search tools for Windows. Using it is as simple as it gets: install it, open the program, and give it a bit to index your entire system (It can index a fresh Windows install in under a minute).

Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version Once that's done, all you have to do is type anything into the text field, and you will get instantaneous results as you type, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. And as long as you allow Everything to sit in the background and monitor system changes, it will always be instantaneous.

Best of all, it's lightweight and takes up less than 5MB RAM and 1MB disk space. This is the absolute best tool to use for old and slow computers.

2. Listary

Of all the software on this list, Listary is probably the most unique. Not only is it 3D Combine 2.6.9 crack serial keygen minimal in design, but it stays completely out of your way until you need it. When you want to search, just start typing. It's as easy as that.

Lucid Dream Remake Free Download And as you type, Listary will show a list of all files on your system that match the query in real-time. Listary can also execute commands like Open Folder and Copy Folder Path. You can even use Listary to quickly hop into a different folder just by typing that folder's name.

Some of its best features require Listary Pro, which is $20. But even with Listary Free, you get a lot of power and flexibility, which is one of the many reasons it makes it on to this list of the best Windows File Explorer extensions for file management.

3. grepWin

If you're someone who likes to have a more hands-on approach with your PC, then grepWin will be one of the most useful tools you'll have at your disposal. With it, you can search through any directory tree, and it will find files by matching contents with your search query (regular expressions are supported).

If you've ever used Linux, it's basically the grep command (one of the essential Linux commands to know), but designed for Windows and comes with a nifty interface. So the next time you need to search for a specific line of code or a specific line of documentation, downie 4 mac Archives will cut your search time by orders of magnitude.

4. AstroGrep

AstroGrep is a great alternative to grepWin if the latter doesn't fit your fancy. It does the same thing—finds files that match your search query by content rather than file name—but is slightly less advanced and easier to use.

You can designate which file types to search, view file contents within AstroGrep itself, and save or print results for later. Potential future features include searching through PDFs, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, MP3s, ZIPs, RARs, and more.

AstroGrep has been around since 2006 and continues to receive regular updates.

5. SearchMyFiles

SearchMyFiles may seem helplessly primitive at first glance, but it's deceptively flexible. Once you get over the slight learning curve, you'll be able to put together complex search queries using filters and wildcards.

For example, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, search all files created in the last 15 minutes, between 300 and 600 bytes in size, and containing the word error. The application is lightweight and portable (no installation required), so you can carry it around on a USB stick. NirSoft also maintains hundreds of other useful utilities that are all clean, portable, and available free of charge.

6. Exselo Desktop

Exselo Desktop isn't as well-known as other free Windows 10 search tool options, which is a shame because it's actually excellent. It supports powerful search queries, has a simple interface, securely shares data, and even integrates with Outlook.

Not only can it search local drives, but Exselo can also comb through network and cloud stores. And best of all, the Free edition is feature complete. The only difference between Free and Enterprise is support for multiple users.

7. Duplicate & Same Files Searcher

Duplicate & Same Files Searcher is a tiny portable program—around 1MB in size—that finds all files that are identical by content (not by file name). As such, the scanning process can be a bit slow, but you can filter and set parameters to speed things up.

And not only can the program delete said duplicates, but it can replace them with hard links that are basically shortcuts to one single file, thus saving you space without breaking anything in the meanwhile.

Can you guess how much of your hard drive space is wasted by duplicate files? The answer might surprise you. Duplicate files are more common than we tend to think, and if those duplicates are image, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, audio, or video files, they can take up a lot of unnecessary space.

Related: How to Wipe Out my Hard Drive in Windows?

8. Registry Finder

Registry Finder is a free tool that makes registry navigation easy. It can also search keys according to when they were last modified, meaning this tool comes in handy when you want to see all recent changes that were made (e.g., for troubleshooting).

Despite the improved search features in Windows 10, the registry is still a bit crude and could use a lot of love. Whether you want to fix errors in the registry or make a few tweaks for usability, the process of finding keys can be slow and tedious—and that's why Registry Finder really shines.

9. UltraSearch

UltraSearch is a creation of JAM Software. They are also the creators of the popular hard drive space recovery program, TreeSize. UltraSearch offers essential search features plus a few extras, all while keeping it simple and fast.

It works by directly searching the Master File Table (MFT). Within the search window, all important file information is displayed. It also displays all of your computer's partitions and their total size and free space. Additional options include showing folders and/or files in a search, exclude filters, and printing the search results.

10. FileSearchEX

If you prefer the style of search from Windows XP, FileSearchEX is the program for you. Not only is the search interface familiar and comfortable, the app itself is portable and uses minimal system resources.

However, there is one drawback: the free version is a trial—not in the sense that the program will expire and become unusable, but the search window will time out. Open the window, complete your search, then close it. If you do this promptly, you should be fine.

Overall the search performance is OK. It isn't nearly as fast as the other programs we tested, but we still noticed it was quicker than the default Windows Search and remains a good alternative.

11. Launchy

Launchy is a nifty app that's meant to replace the Start Menu, the Taskbar, the File Explorer, and desktop shortcuts. If you've ever used a Mac, then it's a bit like Spotlight. Launchy indexes your entire system, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, then lets you launch files, apps, folders, and bookmarks with just a few keystrokes.

Most people think Launchy can only launch apps, but it can search files and folders if you enable the setting. Open Launchy with the Alt + Space shortcut, click the gear icon at the top right, go to the Catalog tab, find File Types in the right panel, then click "+" to add file types and directories that you want to include in the search.

12. Wise JetSearch 

Wise JetSearch is a free search tool for Windows 10. It is capable of searching all types of important files such as videos, music, images, and texts from the local drives and the removable drives.

Wise JetSearch can search all the hard drives and partitions, be they removable disks or secondary disk. It supports a variety of drive formats such as NTFS, FAT, and exFAT. Features like Quick Search and Preview Pane make using a Wise JetSearch a suitable alternative to the default Windows Search tool.

13. FileSeek

If you are a Windows power user looking for more control of your searches, then FileSeek is your best bet. Through its Advance Querying feature, you can use regular expressions to go specific in your search commands.

Then there's the feature of Tabbed Interface. You know how you have to wait for a search to get completed before you can look up something else on Windows? With FileSeek, you won't have to wait like that anymore. Thanks to Tabbed Interface, you can look up multiple files in a single go.

Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version You can also filter the search results by date (creation date, modification date, etc.) and size. There's also a feature to copy the search result to a clipboard, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, and the ability to export them in formats like CSV and HTML.

These and many more such features make FileSeek an attractive choice for those of you who spend a lot of time using Windows 10. Also, you receive a trial version of the Pro version after installation, which switches back to the free version after a short period.

14. Agent Ransack

Agent Ransack is a free Windows search tool available for both personal and commercial use. We like this app because it gives immediate results without you having to open the files and then look up the right information.

You can also share the search results with others Sea of thieves crack serial keygen the printing, exporting, and reporting features that come with this tool. Agent Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version is also available as a free commercial Windows search tool. For commercial purpose, the creators have branded it as FileLocator Lite, although, it's essentially the same tool by the same company.

15. DocFetcher

Are you an open-source aficionado? Then you'll probably like DocFetcher. It's a free open-source desktop search application that can help you search through heaps of files on your computer with blazing fast speed.

"You can think of it as Google for your local files. The application runs on Windows, Linux and OS X, and is made available under the Eclipse Public License," writes DocFetcher on their homepage.

It supports the search of numerous types of files such as PST, HTML, RTF, ODT, MP3, JPEG, plain texts. zip, and much more. With support for both 32- and 64-bit comes the pro-privacy policy of Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, which can be verified from their publicly accessible source code.

In times like ours, where privacy has become a joke, products like DocFetcher offer a breath of fresh air.

Related: Privacy vs. Security vs. Anonymity: What's the Difference?

16. Glarysoft Quick Search

It's a free PC search utility to help you find your files in a fast and efficient manner. Packed with a minimalist interface, the tool offers a search filter, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version, real-time display panel, and a search box.

The software also offers a pro version that comes with added features, but the free version will do the job for most use cases. Apart from giving you relevant results, it will also notify you about junk files that you haven't used and probably don't even need.

17. SSuite Desktop Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version Apart from its clutter-free and smooth search abilities, SSuite Desktop Search tool offers a different but fledgling approach to software and its development: green software.

To put it briefly, green software is a type of software designed to be environmentally sustainable over a period of time.

The SSuite Desktop Search is designed to run on native Windows operating systems using the Win32 API structure, as opposed to other software products that run on Java or .NET. As a result, the latter products have higher memory requirements, resulting in a comparatively higher electrical consumption.

Also, note that when you install the free desktop search app, you'll get a .zip file. To run it, you'll first have to extract it locally on your PC. After that you'll be good to use the app.

Related: What Is Greenwashing and How Does It Affect Your Tech?

What's Your Preferred Free Windows Search Tool?

Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version For better and faster search results, go ahead and pick one of the above tools. The built-in Windows 10 search is getting better, but there's still a long way to go before you can rely solely on it.

There might be many things that annoy and frustrate you in Windows 10, but the user base is so large that you'll always be able to find a third-party software that improves upon Microsoft's shortcomings. These nifty Windows search utilities are proof of that!

The 7 Best Free Alternatives to Fences for Windows Desktop Management

Is your Windows desktop messy? Here are free desktop management apps that can help you organize your virtual clutter.

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OverviewSystem RequirementsRelated

Description

Are you tired with organizing file in the traditional folder structure? Is your folder structure is so complex difficult to find files? Looking for a simple and fun way to organize files? Then Tag Explorer is the ultimate solution for you. Tag Explorer is a simple but yet powerful file management software. It goes beyond traditional file management tools like windows explorer and the folder system. Simply assign any number of tags to files and browse files by their tags. Unlike traditional folder, structure tags don't have any hierarchy and you can browse file by any order you want, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version.

What's new in this version

Add Content view Add open in File Explorer feature

Features

  • A file can have any number of Tags.
  • Group Tags to more organize.
  • Search files by multiple tags.
  • Child folders inherit tags from parent Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version Requirements
    OSWindows 10 version 10240.0 or higher, Windows 8.1
    ArchitectureARM, x64, x86
    KeyboardIntegrated Keyboard
    MouseIntegrated Mouse
    OSWindows 10 version 10240.0 or higher, Windows 8.1
    ArchitectureARM, x64, x86
    KeyboardNot specified
    MouseNot specified
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Windows has a pretty decent search function within the File Explorer. As long as you know the file name and/or file type, you can easily find any file you want within a few seconds.

If you want to improve the search speed, you can simply tag files with relevant keywords. When needed, you can use those tags to do a quick search, not to mention tagging allows you to properly categorize the files without actually renaming or moving them to different folders. This shows how you can tag files in Windows.

Mind the Limitations

Though tagging files in Windows is relatively easy and helpful, there are a couple of things you should know beforehand.

1, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Windows only allows you to tag images, videos, and documents. On rare occasions, depending on the file format, you might not see the tagging option even on supported file types.

2. If you copy or move your files to other computers or external hard drives and thumb drives with a different file system, like FAT32, then the tags might not survive. This has more to do with the file system of the target operating system or hard drive than code vein pc download crack Archives Windows.

Tag Files from Properties Window

Windows lets you add a wide range of metadata information like title, rating, comments, author, etc., for almost any file from the File Properties window. Depending on the file type – like photos, media, and documents – you will even see file type-specific metadata fields. As such, for images, videos and documents, you can easily tag files from the same File Properties window.

1. To get started, select a single file or multiple files, right-click on them and select the option “Properties.”

2. In the Properties window go to the “Details” tab. You can see all the metadata you can add. To add tags, click on the “Tags” field under the Description section and enter Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version tags as needed. Windows automatically separates each tag with a semicolon.

3, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. Once done, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version on the “OK” button to save the changes.

Tag Files from Details Pane (Windows 10)

Alternatively, you can also add file tags via the Details pane. In fact, using the Details pane is one of the easiest ways to tag files in Windows. The Details pane shows relevant information about any selected file, folder, or drive.

1. By default, the Details pane is hidden in the Windows 10 File Explorer, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. To show the Details pane, open File Explorer using the keyboard shortcut + .

2. In the File Explorer click on the “View” tab and select the “Details Pane” option from the navigation pane. You will instantly see the Details pane on the right side of File Explorer.

3. To tag a file, select the file from the main window and then add tags in the Tags field appearing in the Details panel. Click on the “Save” button to confirm changes. Just like with the Properties window, Windows automatically separates all the tags with semicolons.

Tag Files from Details Pane (Windows 7)

If you are still using Windows 7, it is much simpler to do the same thing as in Windows 10 because the details pane is enabled by default and appears when you select a file or folder.

1. Select a file(s) and you will see the details pane at the bottom of the File Explorer window.

2. Add tags in the Tags field and press the Enter button to save the changes.

Search for Tagged Files

Once all your important files are tagged, you can search for them as and when needed using the good old search bar in the File Explorer, Tag Archives: Windows 10 full version. All you have to do is simply use “tag: yourKeyword” in the File Explorer search bar and Windows will find the file almost instantly.

Note: you don’t necessarily have to use the “tag:” keyword when searching for tagged files. However, using it narrows the search to just tags, and the results will appear much faster.

Comment below sharing your thoughts and experiences regarding using the above methods to tag files in Windows.

Is this article useful?

Vamsi KrishnaVamsi Krishna

Vamsi is a tech and WordPress geek who enjoys writing how-to guides and messing with his computer and software in general. When not writing for MTE, he writes for he shares tips, tricks, and lifehacks on his own blog Stugon.

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